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Town and 



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Annual Report 

Epping? New Hampshire 



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Town and School 
Annual Report 



Epping, New Hampshire 



^Q_Jfri» 







Fiscal Year Ending 
December 31, 2006 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Table of Contents 



Town of Epping 

Dedication 3 

Town Meeting Minutes 4 

Committee Reports 12 

Board of Selectmen 12 

Cemetery Trustees 14 

Conservation Commission 14 

Budget Committee 14 

Fire Department 15 

General Assistance (Welfare) Department. . . 17 

Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library 17 

Historic District Commission 18 

Planning Board 19 

Police Department 19 

Recreation Department 20 

Town Clerk's Report 22 

Water & Sewer Commission 22 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 23 

Financial Reports .24 

Tax Collector's Report MS-61 24 

Summary of Valuation MS-1 26 

Statement of Appropriations MS-2 26 

Revised Estimated Revenues MS-4 28 

Report of the Trust Funds MS-9 30 

Report of the Common Trust Fund 

Investments MS-10 33 

Salaries of Town Employees 34 

2006 Tax Rate Calculation 35 

Auditor's Report 36 



General Information 38 

Elected Officials 38 

Appointed Officials 38 

School District Officers 39 

Area Statistical Information 40 

Town Owned Properties 42 

Marriages 44 

Births 46 

Deaths 49 

2007 Town Warrant Articles 51 

2007 Town Budget 56 

Epping School District 

School District Officers 2006-2007 ... .66 

Letters to the Community 67 

School Board 67 

Superintendent of Schools 68 

Assistant Superintendent 69 

Building Committee 70 

Elementary School 72 

Middle School 73 

High School 75 

Director of Special Services 77 

2006 Ballot Results 78 

2007-2008 School District Budget 79 

2007-2008 Warrant Article Info 89 

Deliberative Session Minutes 92 

2007 Sample Ballot 95 

Auditor's Report 96 



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2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Dedication 



The Goodrich Family 

In 1887, William Goodrich founded the 
Goodrich Brickyard and later served as 
Selectman. Ralph Goodiich built the 
first fire station in Town. The first Little 
League field was built by the Goodrich's 
and located on their land. Dexter Goodrich 
was one of the co-founders of the Epping 
Community Bank. Robert Goodrich 
served twelve years on the Planning Board 
and is currently the Town and the School 
Moderator. 

Over the years, many individuals 
from our community were involved in the 
brick making process. This continued until 
1976 when, due to the rising cost of ener- 
gy, brick making was discontinued. Today, 
fifteen local employees assist in selling the 




Dexter Goodrich, the third generation 
owner of the company 



Bob Goodrich, current owner of 
Goodrich Brick and Stone 




stone and bricks originating in locations 
far afield. 

Buildings using original Goodrich 
bricks include: Exeter Hospital, St. Ans- 
lem's College, Fanuiel Hall, the library at 
UMass-Amherst, the original Town Fire 
Station and many of the buildings at the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Whenever our Town embarks on a 
building, or reconstruction endeavor, the 
Goodrich family has been there to assist 
us. That assistance has not been limited to 
the supplies they stock. There is a sense of 
service that matches the high quality of the 
products. 

This sense of service and fairness has 
been their watermark. As a Town, and 
neighbors, we thank them. 



Willie 5. Goodrich (right), founder of the Goodrich Brickyard, and his two sons Ruel and 
Ralph — Circa 1900. 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Town Meeting Minutes 



March 14, 2006 

The deliberative session of the 2006 
Epping Town Meeting was held at the 
Epping Middle High School Gymna- 
sium on Wednesday February 8, 2006. The 
meeting was called to order by Moderator 
Robert Goodrich at 7:05 p.m. A discussion 
of the articles took place. The deliberative 
session was adjourned at 9:25 p.m. 

Final voting on the articles was by of- 
ficial ballot at the polls on March 14, 2006. 
The polls opened at 8:00 a.m. and closed 
at 7:00 p.m. Ballot Clerks were Ann Marie 
Gomez-Amaru, Barbara MacDonald, An- 
drew Vallone, and Patricia Sutliffe. There 
were 938 regular ballots cast and 45 absen- 
tee voters for a total of 983 voters. There 
were 32 new voters who registered at the 
polls. The results are as follows. 

Budget Committee — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 3 
Michael King - 466 
' Ron LaChance - 352 
Amy Randall -611 
Laurilee Shennett - 485 
Gregory Tillman - 384 
Michael King, Amy Randall and 
Laurilee Shennett were elected 

Budget Committee — 1 year 

Vote for not more than 1 
Michelle Cromarty - 765 
Michelle Cromarty was elected 

Cemetery Trustee — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Daniel W.Harvey -843 
Daniel W. Harvey was elected 

Fire Ward — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Charles Goodspeed - 840 
Charles Goodspeed was elected 



Library Trustee — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 2 

Teresa Kucera - 776 

Sylvia Nollet - 669 

Teresa Kucera and Sylvia Nottet were 

elected 

Moderator — 2 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Robert Goodrich - 854 
Robert Goodrich was elected 

Planning Board — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 2 

Rob Graham — 605 

Mike Morasco - 723 

Rob Graham and Mike Morasco were 

elected 

Selectman — 3 years 

Vote for not more than 2 

Jeffrey F. Harris - 632 

Ron LaChance - 306 

Jerry Langdon - 716 

Jeffrey F. Harris and Jerry Langdon 

were elected 

Supervisor of the Checklist — 6 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Pamela Holmes - 816 
Pamela Holmes was elected 

Water & Sewer Commissioner 
— 3 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Joseph Foley - 822 
Joseph Foley was elected 

Trust Fund Trustee - 3 years 

Vote for not more than 1 
Daniel W.Harvey -824 
Daniel W. Harvey was elected 



Zoning Board of Adjustment 
— 3 years 

Vote for not more than 2 

Bob Jordan - 673 

Ron LaChance - 282 

Paul Spidle - 553 

Bob Jordan and Paul Spidle were 

elected 

Article 2: PLANNING AMENDMENT 1 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 1 as proposed by the Planning 
Board for the town zoning ordinance to 
change Article 2 Section 3, West Epping 
Commercial Business Zone as follows: To 
remove certain uses as permitted uses that 
the planning board feels are incompatible 
with the scale, uses, and lots in the area. 
The following uses are proposed to be re- 
moved: wholesale establishments, motel/ 
hotel, shopping malls and plazas, recreation 
establishments/campgrounds, and gasoline 
stations. [Recommended by the Planning 
Board 4-0-0] 

Discussion: A motion was made by 
Thomas Gauthier and seconded by Dianne 
Gilbert to accept the article as written. 
Planning Board member Gregory Tillman 
explained that the area is primarily a resi- 
dential area and this article would remove 
uses that would be incompatible with cur- 
rent uses. 

Results: YES -563 NO -367 
Article 2 PASSED 

Article 3: PLANNING AMENDMENT 2 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 2 as proposed by the Planning 
Board for the town zoning ordinance to 
change Article 2, Section 6 Residential 
Zone and Section 7 Rural Residential Zone 
by changing the following parcels from 
Residential to Rural Residential: Map 7, 
Parcels 1 and2. Map 13: Parcels 1 through 
16. Map 19: Parcels 1 through 3. Map 
20: Parcels 1 through 19. Map 26: Parcels 
43 through 45 and 87 through 93. The 
amendment will change the permitted uses 
and raise the minimum lot sizes. [Recom- 
mended by the Planning Board 4-0-0] 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Discussion: A motion was made by 
Thomas Gauthier and seconded by Dianne 
Gilbert to accept the article as written. 
Gregory Tillman explained that the land 
affected by this article is west of Blake Road 
and this article will make the zoning com- 
patible with what is currently in this area. 
Results: YES -589 NO -311 
Article 3 PASSED 

Article 4: PLANNING AMENDMENT 3 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 3 as proposed by the Planning 
Board for the town zoning ordinance to 
amend Article 3, Industrial Commercial 
Zone and Article 2, Section 6 Residen- 
tial Zone and Article 2, Section 5 High 
Density Residential Zone by changing the 
following parcels from their existing zon- 
ing to be included in Article 2, Section 4 
Central Business Zone: Map 29: Parcels 
178, 186 through 193, 198 through 202, 
205, 206, 208 through 216, 285 through 
291, 293, 294, and 296. The amendment 
will change the permitted uses for these 
properties in an effort to encourage more 
non-residential development in areas near 
the core of downtown and promote high- 
density mixed uses in downtown. This 
change seeks to encourage revitalization of 
Epping's downtown and make it a destina- 
tion for the Town. [Recommended by the 
Planning Board 3-0-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Thom- 
as Gauthier and seconded by Christopher 
Murphy to accept this article as written. 
Gregory Tillman explained that this article 
will create a triangle of land east of Route 
125 to Main Street and south of the Lam- 
prey River. The permitted uses will be com- 
patible with the existing uses. 
Results: YES -604 NO -311 
Article 4 PASSED 

Article 5: PLANNING AMENDMENT 4 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 4 as proposed by the Planning 
Board for the town zoning ordinance to 
amend Article 10 Epping Wetlands Or- 
dinance to provide greater protections to 
wetland resources that are associated with 
the Piscassic River in the triangular area 
of Epping bounded by Route 125, Route 
101, and the border with the Town of 



Brentwood. The proposed amendment will 
increase buffer requirements for these wet- 
lands and mitigation requirements for im- 
pacts. The proposed amendment will also 
limit water withdrawals from wetland re- 
sources to public safety and drinking water 
purposes. [Recommended by the Plan- 
ning Board 4-0-0] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Gregory Tillman explained that this article 
would increase the protection near the Pis- 
cassic River due to the development in that 
area. 

Results: YES -703 NO -222 
Article 5 PASSED 

Article 6: REAFFIRM THE ADOPTION 
OF THE PROVISIONS OF 
RSA 41:14-A: ALLOWING THE BOARD 
OF SELECTMEN TO ACQUIRE OR SELL 
LAND OR BUILDINGS 
To see if the Town will reaffirm theii adop- 
tion the provisions of RSA 41: 14a which au- 
thorizes the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
or sell land, buildings, or both, provided 
that the Selectmen first submit the pro- 
posed acquisition or sale to the Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission for 
review and recommendation, and further 
provided that they first hold two public 
hearings on the proposal. Then Selectmen 
may proceed, provided that if 50 or more 
registered voters petition the Selectmen, 
the acquisition or sale shall not proceed 
until it is approved by the voters at town 
meeting. [Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen 4-0] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Susan 
McGeough and seconded by Dianne Gil- 
ben to accept this article as written. Select- 
man Gauthier explained that this article is 
no different than what was previously voted 
and what is currendy in existence, but the 
Board wanted the Town to be aware of this 
provision. 

Results: YES -645 NO -276 
Article 6 PASSED 

Article 7: AMENDING THE ELDERLY 
EXEMPTION 

To see if the Town will vote to modify the 
Elderly Exemption from property tax in the 



Town of Epping, based on assessed value, 
for qualified full time resident taxpayers to 
be as follows: for a person 65 years of age up 
to 74 years, $40,000; for a person 75 years 
up to 79 years, $50,000; for a person 80 
years of age or older $60,000. To qualify, 
the person must have resided in the State 
of New Hampshire at least 5 consecutive 
years preceding April 1, own the real estate 
individually or jointly, or if the real estate is 
owned by such person's spouse, they must 
have been married or a domestic partner for 
at least 5 years. In addition, the taxpayer 
must have a net income of not more than 
$19,000 or, if married, a combined net in- 
come of not more than $29,000, and own 
assets not in excess of $50,000; excluding 
the value of the property this exemption 
is applied to and which is the person's pri- 
mary residence. [Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 4-0] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Don Sisson spoke about the end result of 
the revaluation which showed that prop- 
erty values in Epping increased an average 
of 250%, but the proposed elderly exemp- 
tion amounts are only doubled. He made a 
motion to increase the exemption amounts 
to the following: 

For a person 65 years of age up to 
74 years, $50,000; for a person 75 years 
up to 79 years, $65,000; for a person 80 
years of age or older $75,000. 

The motion was seconded by Christo- 
pher Murphy. There would be no change 
in the income or asset limits that would be 
needed to qualify for the exemption. Se- 
lectman Murphy explained that discussion 
on this article started before the Selectmen 
had all the data from the revaluation, and 
the goal had been to make the elderly ex- 
emption give the same relief that it had in 
the past. He agreed that this amendment 
would be better than the original article 
and stressed that since the income and as- 
set limits were so low it was truly protect- 
ing the elderly residents that most needed 
help to keep their homes. Town Adminis- 
trator Fournier stated that a public hearing 
on this article will need to be held and it is 
scheduled for February 27th. A hand vote 
was taken on the amendment and the 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



amendment passed. The article as amend- 
ed reads: 

To see if the Town will vote to modify 
the Elderly Exemption from property tax in 
the Town of Epping, based on assessed val- 
ue, for qualified full time resident taxpayers 
to be as follows: for a person 65 years of 
age up to 74 years, $50,000; for a person 75 
years up to 79 years, $65,000; for a person 
80 years of age or older $75,000. To quali- 
fy, the person must have resided in the State 
of New Hampshire at least 5 consecutive 
years preceding April 1, own the real estate 
individually or joindy, or if the real estate is 
owned by such person's spouse, they must 
have been married or a domestic partner for 
at least 5 years. In addition, the taxpayer 
must have a net income of not more than 
$19,000 or, if married, a combined net in- 
come of not more than $29,000, and own 
assets not in excess of $50,000; excluding 
the value of the property this exemption 
is applied to and which is the person's pri- 
mary residence. 

Results: YES - 772 NO - 168 
Article 7 PASSED 

Article 8: SPRAYING FOR 
MOSQUITOES 

To see if the Town will vote to support the 
method of widespread spraying for the treat- 
ment and extermination of mosquitoes, in- 
sects and other pests. [Recommended by 
the Board of Selectmen 4-0] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Susan 
McGeough and seconded by Dianne Gil- 
bert to accept this article as written. Greg- 
ory Tillman asked why no money had been 
allocated for this article. Selectman Mc- 
Geough explained that this article was rec- 
ommended by the State to get the feeling 
of the Town regarding spraying. When it is 
time to do the spraying there may be grants 
available to help defray the cost. Greg Till- 
man asked where the spraying would be 
done and when. Selectman Gauthier re- 
plied that the areas would be swampy areas 
and catch basins where mosquitoes breed. 
The Selectmen would develop a plan and 
work with the State. Michael Morasco 
asked if there would be a public hearing so 
that residents would know where spraying 
would occur. Selectman McGeough re- 
plied that there would be at least one public 



hearing and information would be given 
to newspapers of other options for control- 
ling the mosquito population. Tom Sudiffe 
was concerned that we did not know what 
would be sprayed, where it would happen 
or what it would cost. We might be able 
to get funding for the first year, but need 
to raise the funds for future years. Select- 
man Murphy stated that the selectmen are 
just looking for direction with this article. 
The State could come in and spray regard- 
less of our vote. If the Town is in favor of 
this, the Selectmen would put money in 
the budget for future years. Mike Morasco 
felt this would be fine as long as it is eco- 
logically friendly. Katherine Cooper asked 
if the Town would investigate the type of 
pesticide to be used. Selectman McGeough 
stated that there are strong feelings for and 
against spraying, and the Selectmen want 
to know what the Town wants. 
Results: YES -764 NO -178 
Article 8 PASSED 

Article 9: TOWN HALL IMPROVEMENT 
EXPENDABLE TRUST 

To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000) to be placed in the previously 
established Town Hall Improvement Ex- 
pendable Trust Fund. This sum will come 
from fund balance and no additional funds 
will be raised through taxation. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
Not Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 2-7-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as tead. Se- 
lectman Murphy explained the reason for 
including this article. Due to the difficult 
nature of defending the Town Hall against 
fire, he has wanted to have a sprinkler sys- 
tem installed and money had been allo- 
cated for this project. Due to the need to 
have the front steps replaced this past year, 
money was used for the steps instead of the 
sprinkler system. This article would replen- 
ish the improvement fund and allow us to 
go forward with the sprinkler system. Don 
Sisson asked why the Budget Committee 
had not recommended this article. Chair- 
man James McGeough replied that due to 
the tax shock the residents had received in 



2005, the Budget Committee only wanted 
to recommend articles that were most nec- 
essary. Peter Loch asked for a definition 
of the fund balance. Town Administrator 
Fournier answered that money not spent at 
the end of the year could be moved to the 
next year with a vote of the Town. 
Results: YES -492 NO -428 
Article 9 PASSED 

Article 10: LANDFILL CLOSURE FUND 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dol- 
lars ($5,000) to be deposited into the exist- 
ing Landfill Closure Capital Reserve Fund. 
[Not Recommended by the Board of Se- 
lectmen 1-4; Not Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 0-9-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Don Sisson stated that the Town had been 
putting some money away each year to 
prepare for this and wanted to know how 
much it should cost. Selectman McGeough 
responded that the cost could be a million 
dollars or more and hoped that there would 
be grant money available when the Town 
needs to do the closure. The Selectmen 
voted not to recommend the article this 
year due to the current tax situation, but 
this article would probably be presented 
in future years. Don Sisson felt the tax in- 
crease for this article would be minor. Bud- 
get Committee member Paul Spidle agreed 
that there is a need for this article, but the 
committee asked boards to cut any expense 
that was not urgent or a public safety issue. 
He stated that 15 years ago it was estimated 
that engineering costs for the landfill clo- 
sure would be about $150,000. 
Results: YES -246 NO -678 
Article 10 FAILED 

Article 11: COMPACTOR/CONTAINER 
PURCHASE FOR TRANSFER STATION 

To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
the sum of thirty thousand dollars and no 
cents ($30,000.00) for the purchase of a new 
solid waste compactor and container and to 
perform any necessary site work at the trans- 
fer station. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 7-2-1] 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Selectman Gilbert explained that this ar- 
ticle was for replacing an existing com- 
pactor that is 20 years old; it is not for an 
additional compactor. Attendants at the 
Transfer Station have reported that the 
oldest machine could break down at any 
time. Although the Town can limp along 
with the remaining 3 units, we really need 
the 4th due to the increase in growth and 
trash tonnage. We will need to purchase a 
new container, but funds for the container 
are included in the operating budget. Se- 
lectman Gilbert made a plea for residents 
to bring to the transfer station only trash 
that is from Epping. James McGeough 
stated that the Budget Committee sees the 
operation of the Transfer Station as a cri- 
sis situation. The Town is shipping out too 
much trash and needs to encourage more 
recycling. The cost of operating the Trans- 
fer Station is much too high. 
Results: YES -634 NO -294 
Article 11 PASSED 

Article 12: POLICE COPS FAST GRANT 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $42,135.00 (Forty 
Two Thousand One Hundred Thirty Five 
Dollars) for the hiring of one additional 
full-time Police Officer including ben- 
efits. $17,135.00 (Seventeen Thousand 
One Hundred Thirty Five Dollars) is to be 
raised by taxes. The balance of $25,000.00 
(Twenty Five Thousand Dollars) shall be 
provided by an approved three year Unit- 
ed States Department of Justice Office of 
Community Oriented Policing Services 
Grant funded at $25,000.00 per year. Ap- 
proval would call for a total estimated in- 
crease of $132,831.00 (One Hundred Thir- 
ty Two Thousand Eight Hundred Thirty 
One Dollars) in fiscal years 2006, 2007, 
and 2008. $57,831.00 (Fifty Seven Thou- 
sand Eight Hundred Thirty One Dollars) 
is to be raised by taxes with a total offset- 
ting revenue from the grant of $75,000.00 
(Seventy Five Thousand Dollars). Upon 
termination of the grant period (3 years) 
the Town would fully fund the additional 
full-time Police Officer position. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 



Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 6-2-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Susan 
McGeough and seconded by Christopher 
Murphy to accept this article as written. Po- 
lice Chief Greg Dodge explained that this is 
the third year that he has presented this ar- 
ticle. Epping was one of three towns in New 
Hampshire selected to receive this grant and 
we were eligible for three officers. Two years 
ago he split the grant into two articles, one 
asking for one additional officer and another 
asking for two additional officers. Only the 
article requesting one officer passed, so last 
year he presented an article asking for one 
more officer. At the deliberative session this 
was amended to request two officers, and 
the article failed. The police department ap- 
plied for this grant so that police protection 
could be provided at the least cost to the 
Town. Chief Dodge just received a phone 
call from Washington, DC informing him 
that even if we pass this article, they might 
not be able to fund the grant for this addi- 
tional officer. He therefore requested the fol- 
lowing amendment to the article: 

In the event federal funding ex- 
pires the Town authorizes an additional 
$6,000.00 (Six Thousand Dollars) be 
raised and appropriated to fund the ad- 
ditional officer. 

This would result in funding the salary 
and benefits for half a year. The motion was 
seconded by Liz Conrad. Paul Spidle stated 
that the Town would then need to fund 
the entire cost of the officer in future years. 
Charlie Goodspeed asked Chief Dodge to 
list the needs that awarded Epping the grant 
originally. Chief Dodge explained that the 
grant had been written by Lt. Wallace and 
was based on the demographics of the 
Town, the recent commercial and residen- 
tial growth, our location on a major route 
to the seacoast, and the amount of crime we 
are experiencing. Heather Kyle asked if we 
would eliminate the officer after 6 months 
if the grant falls through. Chief Dodge re- 
plied that we would not, and would prob- 
ably include it as a line item in the budget. 
Peter Loch asked why the article mentions 
an "estimated increase". This is because 
DRA requires that we must estimate the 
full cost for the three year period. A hand 
vote was taken on the amendment and 



the amendment passed. The article as 
amended reads: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $42,135.00 
(Forty Two Thousand One Hundred Thir- 
ty Five Dollars) for the hiring of one ad- 
ditional full-time Police Officer including 
benefits. $17,135.00 (Seventeen Thousand 
One Hundred Thirty Five Dollars) is to be 
raised by taxes. The balance of $25,000.00 
(Twenty Five Thousand Dollars) shall be 
provided by an approved three year Unit- 
ed States Department of Justice Office of 
Community Oriented Policing Services 
Grant funded at $25,000.00 per year. Ap- 
proval would call for a total estimated in- 
crease of $132,831.00 (One Hundred Thir- 
ty Two Thousand Eight Hundred Thirty 
One Dollars) in fiscal years 2006, 2007, 
and 2008. $57,831.00 (Fifty Seven Thou- 
sand Eight Hundred Thirty One Dollars) is 
to be raised by taxes with a total offsetting 
revenue from the grant of $75,000.00 (Sev- 
enty Five Thousand Dollars). Upon ter- 
mination of the grant period (3 years) the 
Town would fully fund the additional full- 
time Police Officer position. In the event 
federal funding expires, the Town authoriz- 
es an additional $6,000.00 (Six Thousand 
Dollars) be raised and appropriated to fund 
the additional officer. 
Results: YES -519 NO -425 
Article 12 PASSED 

Article 13: HIGHWAY TRUCK 
EXPENDABLE TRUST FUND 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty Thousand 
Dollars ($20,000) to be added to the exist- 
ing Highway Truck Capital Reserve Fund. 
[Not Recommended by the Board of Se- 
lectmen 1-4; Not Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 1-8-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Chris- 
topher Murphy and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as read. Se- 
lectman Murphy explained that this is an 
ongoing fund that is used to purchase high- 
way equipment. When the Town went out 
for bids to hire snowplowing for this win- 
ter, we were not able to get enough people 
to apply. This fund will help the Town to 
purchase another vehicle that can be used 
by Town employees for plowing. We have 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



been buying used vehicles and equipping 
them with plows and sanders. 
Results: YES -180 NO -766 
Article 13 FAILED 

Article 14: FUNDS FOR ETV 

To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $3,000 to be placed 
in the previously established Epping Tele- 
vision Expendable Trust Fund. These 
funds represent the difference between the 
Epping Television Operating Budget and 
the amount of money collected in franchise 
fees in 2005. This sum will come from the 
fund balance and will have no impact on 
the tax rate. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 9-0-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as read. Su- 
san McGeough made a motion to amend 
this article to change the amount from 
$3,000 to $19,343. The amendment was 
seconded by Christoper Murphy who ex- 
plained that the selectmen had not received 
their final payment of franchise fees when 
this article was written, but now the final 
number is known. Mike Morasco ques- 
tioned how the amount was determined. 
Selectman McGeough explained that each 
year the cable company collects a small 
amount from each resident and turns this 
money over to the Town. Last year the 
Town voted to use this money for ETV and 
not keep it in the general fund. A hand vote 
was taken and the amendment passed. 
The article as amended reads: 

To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $19,343.00 (Nine- 
teen Thousand Three Hundred Forty Three 
Dollars) to be placed in the previously es- 
tablished Epping Television Expendable 
Trust Fund. These funds represent the dif- 
ference between the Epping Television Op- 
erating Budget and the amount of money 
collected in franchise fees in 2005. This 
sum will come from the fund balance and 
will have no impact on the tax rate. [Rec- 
ommended by the Board of Selectmen 
5-0; Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 9-0-1] 
Results: YES -633 NO -309 
Article 14 PASSED 



Article 15: LEASE / PURCHASE OF 
AMBULANCE 

To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to enter into a five 
(5) year lease agreement not to exceed one 
hundred ninety-five thousand dollars and 
no cents ($195,000.00) for the purpose of 
leasing and equipping an ambulance for the 
Fire Department, and to raise and appro- 
priate the first year's lease expenditure of an 
amount not to exceed thirty nine thousand 
dollars and no cents ($39,000.00) from the 
Public Safety Facilities Fund, a fund solely 
financed by revenue from the ambulance 
fees. This lease agreement will contain a 
non-appropriation clause and will have a 
one dollar ($1.00) purchase option at the 
end of the lease. There will be no tax impact 
in 2006. [Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Chris- 
topher Murphy and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Fire Chief Brian Toomire explained that 
when department heads were told to con- 
serve money wherever possible, the Fire 
Department reviewed their requests. They 
returned $56,000 of their 2005 budget to 
the Town and reduced their 2006 budget 
request from the 2005 level. At the same 
time they saw an increase in the volume 
of calls they needed to respond to. As a re- 
sult he predicts that he will not be able to 
maintain these cuts in the future. He had 
wanted to present a second article this year, 
but decided to put it off for another year 
and only present this article which he be- 
lieves is essential. In 1980 the Fire Depart- 
ment instituted a 5 year plan for replacing 
ambulances. We currently have a 5 year 
old vehicle and a 10 year old vehicle. It is 
time to replace the 10 year old vehicle, and 
it would not be appropriate to purchase a 
used vehicle for this purpose. Mike King 
from the Budget Committee explained 
that although the committee initially voted 
not to recommend this article, they had 
received more information from the fire 
department and then voted to support this 
article. Chief Toomire provided more in- 
formation about the disposition of the old- 
est ambulance. The Fire Department did 
not feel they would receive much for a trade 



in on the old vehicle, so they are planning 
to keep it as a back up housed in the West 
Epping station. Many ambulance person- 
nel reside in West Epping and this would 
enhance our response time. Also, when 
there is an accident resulting in two people 
requiring an ambulance, the town needs 
to call a neighboring town for back up and 
this results in lost revenue of approximately 
$500 per missed call. There is minimal cost 
involved in keeping this vehicle since the 
West Epping station is already heated and 
the vehicle would only require about $500 
to $600 for maintenance over the coming 
year. Mike King raised the issue of how ex- 
cess ambulance revenue should be used. He 
felt it should be used for purchasing other 
fire fighting equipment rather than making 
payments on a new ambulance. Peter Loch 
also had concerns about what the tax im- 
pact would be for 2007 and future years. 
Charlie Goodspeed replied that we can't as 
a Town vote to commit money for a pur- 
pose beyond the 2006 year. Chris Murphy 
agreed that we can't say what we would do 
with future revenue, but felt that this is a 
good deal for the Town. 
Results: YES -600 NO -351 
Article 15 PASSED 

Article 16: CONTRIBUTION TO ADULT 
TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars ($500.00) to be distributed to the 
Adult Tutorial Program for services esti- 
mated to be rendered to residents of the 
Town during the year 2006. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
Recommended by the Municipal Bud- 
get Committee 7-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Paul Spidle spoke in opposition to this ar- 
ticle and all other contribution articles ex- 
cept the ones for the Epping Youth Athletic 
Association and the Lamprey River Youth 
Soccer. He listed the following reasons for 
his position. First, these organizations are 
funded at the county, state, and federal 
levels as well. Second, there is no state law 
that authorizes the Town to raise money 
for this purpose. Third, due to the privacy 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



law there is no way to know who receives 
assistance, and the organizations will not 
sign a contract saying that money raised by 
Epping will be used in Epping. In addition, 
both the Red Cross and the Rockingham 
County Community Action are currently 
under investigation for misuse of funds. 
Susan McGeough spoke in favor of the ar- 
ticles. She stated that the two warrant ar- 
ticles that the Town voted against last year 
were not recommended this year. There are 
many people in town who know individu- 
als that have been helped by these organiza- 
tions, and as a society we need to take care 
of each other. 

Results: YES -557 NO -391 
Article 16 PASSED 

Article 17: CONTRIBUTION TO AIDS 
RESPONSE SEACOAST 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Five Hundred Twenty 
Five Dollars ($525.00) to be distributed to 
the AIDS Response Seacoast for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2006. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 5-4-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Resident Siobhan Senier thanked the Town 
for its past support. She informed the Town 
that this organization does not receive 
county or state funding. The funding they 
receive from the federal government is re- 
stricted and cannot be used in ways that 
are often needed. This contribution helps 
to supply those services. 
Results: YES -501 NO -440 

ARTICLE 17 PASSED 

Article 18: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
AMERICAN RED CROSS— GREAT BAY 
CHAPTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Five Hundred Dollars 
($500.00) to be distributed to American 
Red Cross - Great Bay Chapter for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2006. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
No Recommendation from the Munici- 



pal Budget Committee 5-5] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -541 NO -408 
Article 18 PASSED 

Article 19: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
AREA HOMECARE AND FAMILY 
SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Six 
Hundred and Ten Dollars ($2,610) to be 
distributed to Area Homecare & Family 
Services for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2006. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-4-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -617 NO -332 
Article 19 PASSED 

Article 20: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
SEACOAST BIG BROTHER/BIG SISTER 
PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Six 
Hundred Twenty Dollars ($1,620) to be 
distributed to Seacoast Big Brother/Big Sis- 
ter Program for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2006. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-4-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -560 NO -386 
Article 20 PASSED 

Article 21: CONTRIBUTION TO CHILD 
AND FAMILY SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Four Thousand Dol- 
lars ($4,000) to be distributed to Child & 
Family Services for services estimated to 
be rendered to residents of the Town dur- 
ing the year 2006. [Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended 
by the Municipal Budget Committee 
6-3-1] 



Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -612 NO -337 
Article 21 PASSED 

Article 22: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
COMMUNITY DIVERSION PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Five 
Hundred and Ninety Dollars ($1,590) to 
be distributed to Community Diversion 
Program for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2006. [Not Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 0-5; Not Recom- 
mended by the Municipal Budget Com- 
mittee 4-5-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -241 NO -690 
Article 22 FAILED 

Article 23: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
LAMPREY HEALTH CARE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Seven Hundred Eighty Dollars ($3,780) to 
be distributed to Lamprey Health Care for 
services estimated to be rendered to resi- 
dents of the Town during the year 2006. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 3-2; Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -548 NO -403 
Article 23 PASSED 

Article 24: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
RICHIE MCFARLAND CHILDREN'S 
CENTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Eight Hundred Fifty Dollars ($3,850) to 
be distributed to McFarland Children's 
Center for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during 
the year 2006. [Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended 
by the Municipal Budget Committee 
5-4-1] 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Resident Tom Dwyer spoke in support of 
this organization. His daughter needed 
help with her speech before she was eligible 
for help through the School system. By the 
time she started school she no longer re- 
quired services. 

Results: YES -567 NO -385 
Article 24 PASSED 

Article 25: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
RETIRED SENIOR VOLUNTEER 
PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Hundred 
Dollars ($300) to be distributed to Retired 
Senior Volunteer Program for services es- 
timated to be rendered to residents of the 
Town during the year 2006. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 6-3-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -631 NO -317 
Article 25 PASSED 

Article 26: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY COMMUNITY 
ACTION 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Ten Thousand Two 
Hundred Eighty-Five Dollars ($10,285) to 
be distributed to Rockingham Co. Com- 
munity Action for services estimated to be 
rendered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2006. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -520 NO -424 
Article 26 PASSED 

Article 27: CONTRIBUTION TO 
ROCKINGHAM NUTRITION AND 
MEALS ON WHEELS 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Ten Dollars ($3,910) 



to be distributed to Rockingham Nutri- 
tion & Meals On Wheels for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2006. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; 
Recommended by the Municipal Bud- 
get Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -732 NO -225 
Article 27 PASSED 

Article 28: CONTRIBUTION TO A SAFE 
PLACE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred Dol- 
lars ($500) to be distributed to A Safe Place 
for services estimated to be rendered to resi- 
dents of the Town during the year 2006. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 3-2; Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -641 NO -307 
Article 28 PASSED 

Article 29: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEACOAST HOSPICE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($1,500) to be distributed 
to Seacoast Hospice for services estimated 
to be rendered to residents of the Town 
during the year 2006. [Recommended 
by the Board of Selectmen 3-2; Recom- 
mended by the Municipal Budget Com- 
mittee 6-3-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -671 NO -281 
Article 29 PASSED 

Article 30: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEACOAST MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) to be distrib- 
uted to Seacoast Mental Health for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of the 
Town during the year 2006. [Not Recom- 



mended by the Board of Selectmen 0-5; 
Not Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 3-6-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -350 NO -588 
Article 30 FAILED 

Article 31: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Two 
Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($1,250) to be 
distributed to Sexual Assault Support Ser- 
vices for services estimated to be rendered 
to residents of the Town during the year 
2006. [Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen 3-2; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Results: YES -610 NO -333 
Article 31 PASSED 

Article 32: 2006 OPERATING BUDGET 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate as an operating budget, not in- 
cluding appropriations by special warrant 
articles and other appropriations voted sep- 
arately, the amounts set forth on the bud- 
get posted with the warrant or as amended 
by vote of the first session, for the purposes 
set forth therein, totaling four million 
eight hundred eighty-one thousand one 
hundred two dollars and eighty-one cents 
($4,881,102.81). Should this article be de- 
feated, the default budget shall be four mil- 
lion seven hundred twenty seven thousand 
two hundred eighty-eight dollars and thir- 
ty nine cents ($4,727,288.39), which is the 
same as last year, with certain adjustments 
required by previous action of the Town or 
by law or the governing body may hold one 
special meeting, in accordance with RSA 
40:13, X and XVI, to take up the issue of 
a revised operating budget only. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0; 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 9-0-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Budget Committee Chairman Jim Mc- 
Geough stated that this budget is extreme- 
ly bare and is only greater than the default 
budget by $153,000. If the original budget 
fails, the Town would not be able to pay for 
the mapping which is needed in the Plan- 
ning Department. It would then cost the 
Town even more to have new maps drawn 
up in the future. To decrease the budget by 
a dollar on the current tax rate, the Town 
would have to decrease the Recreation pro- 
gram offerings, decrease the hours the Li- 
brary is open, and decrease the dump hours 
to one day per week. He urged the Town to 
support the recommended budget. 
Results: YES -666 NO -284 
Article 32 PASSED 

Article 33: By Petition: 
CONTRIBUTION TO LAMPREY RIVER 
YOUTH SOCCER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dol- 
lars ($1,000) to be distributed to Lamprey 
River Youth Soccer. [Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 4-0; Recommended by 
the Municipal Budget Committee 6-3-1] 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
George Kimball spoke in support of this ar- 
ticle, and stated that there are between 170 
and 200 children from Epping that partici- 
pate in this program. 
Results: YES -609 NO -346 
Article 33 PASSED 



Article 34: By Petition: 
CONTRIBUTION TO THE EPPING 
YOUTH ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Dollars ($3,000) in support of the Epping 
Youth Athletic Association. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 4-0; 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 9-0-1] 

Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Steve Illsley, Vice President of the EYAA 
spoke in support of this article. There has 
never been an increase in the funding re- 
quested over the years. The EYAA provides 
baseball, Softball and basketball, and this 
article helps with equipment and registra- 
tion fees for families needing assistance. 
The organization is run entirely with vol- 
unteers. 

Results: YES -695 NO -250 
Article 34 PASSED 

Article 35: By Petition: 
DISCONTINUANCE OF TWO RIGHT 
OF WAYS BETWEEN MEADOWBROOK 
DRIVE AND TOWN TAX MAP 17 LOT 9 

To see if the Town will discontinue two 
50ft dedicated ways between Meadow- 
brook Drive and Tax Map 17 Lot 9. 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Marlene Hagan, one of the petitioners, ex- 
plained that one of the right of ways goes 
through her garage due to an error made 
when the building permit was originally 



applied for. The law allows for the Town 
to dissolve a right of way if it has not been 
used for 20 years, and the developers of the 
proposed subdivision are looking at an- 
other access to Meadowbrook Drive. Susan 
McGeough stated that the Selectmen had 
received a legal opinion that if passed this 
article would be non-binding. 
Results: YES -471 NO -390 
Article 35 PASSED 

Article 36: By Petition: RESCIND 2004 
TOWN MEETING NOISE ORDINANCE 

To see if the Voters of the Town of Epping 
will rescind its vote of March 9, 2004 where 
Article 48 changed the noise ordinance to 
read, "so that from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 
residents can use and enjoy, on their own 
property, recreational vehicles and other 
operating equipment" and return the ordi- 
nance to its original language and intent. 
Discussion: A motion was made by Su- 
san McGeough and seconded by Thomas 
Gauthier to accept this article as written. 
Mike Morasco asked what the old language 
was. Tom Gauthier replied that the origi- 
nal ordinance was more strict in the hours 
of operation of recreational vehicles and 
equipment. Chief Dodge added that this 
article would only remove this one phrase 
and that the original ordinance was 5 pages 
long. Regardless of what the Town ordi- 
nance says, there is a State law that super- 
cedes the Town's. 
Results: YES -445 NO -467 
Article 36 FAILED 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Linda Foley, Town Clerk 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Committee Reports 



Board of Selectmen 

This past spring, the State of New Hamp- 
shire saw some of the worst flooding in 
its history. The Town of Epping was not 
spared. We suffered damage to numerous 
roads and bridges, but all were able to be 
repaired. The Lamprey River breached its 
banks, leaving many homes with a signifi- 
cant amount of water damage. After all was 
said and done, the Town saw over $75,000 
in damage to town property, not including 
damages individual homeowners incurred. 
The Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA), as well as the State Bu- 
reau of Emergency Management and the 
American Red Cross, assisted the Town's 
Fire, Police, and Highway Departments to 
make sure the Town was able to rebuild 
its infrastructure quickly. We would like 
to thank all of the people, especially the 
Fire, Police and Highway Departments, 
for their tireless work. 

The Board began to address the grow- 
ing demand on the limited capacity of our 
solid waste facilities. Accordingly, we ap- 
pointed a Solid Waste Advisory Commit- 




tee to make recommendations on ways to 
improve operations and management of our 
facilities. Epping currently pays $71 a ton 




A flooded property on Folsom Mill Lane 



Mill Street Bridge 

to deposit waste at the landfill. Our goal 
is to increase the amount we recycle and 
reduce what is put into the waste stream. 
We continue to encourage all our residents 
to recycle. 

After years of establishing a capital re- 
serve fund, we have actively begun to ad- 
dress the closing of the landfill (commonly 
referred to as the Stump Dump). The De- 
partment of Environmental Services is re- 
quiring the Town to study the facility to 
determine how much usable life the landfill 
has and additionally to plan for the eventu- 
al closure. In late 2006, the Board sent out 
a request for proposals beginning this pro- 
cess, and will soon hire an engineering firm 
needed too work on this project. The goal is 
to keep the facility open as long as possible. 
The Solid Waste Advisory Committee has 
already implemented ways to remove some 
materials from the landfill to other sites. 
This will allow us to manage its growth, 
allowing for longer use. Formal closing, in 
accordance with DES, will be a significant 
cost and the Board is looking at all possible 
outside funds to support this effort. 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Refuse & Recycling 







General Guidelines 

The refuse and recycling facilities in 
Epping are open to residents only. To 
use these facilities, a resident must 
first purchase a Solid Waste Permit for 
$5.00/yr. for each vehicle at the Clerk's Office and attach this 
permit to a side or rear window of their vehicle. Vehicles that 
do not have a Solid Waste Permit that matches the registra- 
tion and inspection sticker will not be allowed to enter any of 
Epping's dumping facilities. 

Any resident who wishes to use a vehicle that does not 
have a Solid Waste Permit to haul items to a dumping facility 
must get a special permit at the Clerk's Office. 

The removal of items from Epping's dumping facilities 
(scavenging) is not permitted, except for items left at the Recy- 
cling Center's swap shop area. 

Transfer Station 

Open Wed 2 p.m.-7 p.m., Sat & Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 

■ Household trash only. No construction debris, no bulky 
items, no recyclable and no hazardous materials are to be 
placed in to the compactors. 



Recycling Center 

Open Wed 2 p.m.-7 p.m.. Sat & Sun 9 a.m. 



-4 p.m. 



Automotive Items: Used engine, transmission or 
hydraulic oils can be left at no charge. If you wish to 
keep your container see the attendant, otherwise leave 
it in a clearly marked and sealed container by the oil 
recovery tank. 

• Lead acid auto batteries can be left by the motor oil 
recovery tank at no charge. 

• Anti-freeze is not accepted. 

Aluminum Cans: soda and beer cans. 



Cardboard: corrugated cardboard, 
boxes and cartons. Flattened if 
possible. No paper board (i.e. cereal, 
pasta or shoe boxes). No wet or waxed 
cardboard (i.e. orange juice or milk 
cartons). 

Glass: clear, green, and brown bottles 
and jars. Rinse and remove the lids. 
Labels can be left on. No plate glass, 
light bulbs or ceramics. 



Paper: newspapers, phone books, magazines, 
paperboard (cereal, pasta and shoe boxes). Leave in 
brown paper bags, not in plastic bags or tied in string. 

Plastic: soda, milk, water and juice bottles/jugs and 
colored plastics #2 (includes laundry detergent, bleach, 
some shampoo and motor oil containers). 

Steel Cans: pet food, vegetable and fruit juice 
containers. Rinse out. Labels can be left on. 

Swap Shop: Used items in good usable condition can 
be left for others to pick up (such as books, toys, knick 
knacks, etc.) Used clothing can be left in bags at the 
swap shop for transport to Planet Aide. (No wooden 
furniture or TV/computer items.) 



Stump Dump 

Open Sat & Sun 9 a.m. 



•4 p.m. 




A separate pass must be purchased at the Town Hall 
before dropping off any items that has a fee. 

■ Tires: Up to 4 tires per resident per week. Fees of $5 
for automobile and light truck tires, $15 with rims. For 
truck tires (series 920 or larger) the fee is $30, $40 with 
rims. 

■ Bulky Items: The charge for Bulky items will be $10 
per item. Bulky items include but are not limited to, 
furniture such as couches, mattresses, upholstered chairs, 
carpeting/rugs. (No wooden furniture, dressers, coffee 
tables, etc.) 

■ Scrap Metal: Scrap metal (iron, aluminum, copper, 
etc.) will be taken at no charge. 

■ Appliances: Household appliances without refrigerant 

chemicals/Freon, will be taken at no charge. These 
appliances include, but are not limited to, washing 
machines, ranges, stoves, and dishwashers. 

Household appliances that do contain refrigerant 
chemicals/Freon will have a fee of $10 for each item. 
These appliances include, but are not limited to 
refrigerators, dehumidifiers and air conditioners. 

■ Televisions: Televisions and computers 
(monitor & CPU: Laptop) will have a 
charge of $10 each. 

■ Propane: Propane tanks will be taken at 
the stump dump for a $5.00 charge. 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Development continues in Epping. 
We have several new commercial projects 
underway along Rt. 125 with the Eppi- 
Center Plaza, the Hurlbert Toyota dealer- 
ship (behind McDonald's) and the plaza 
being built north on Rt. 125. Similar to 
many communities Epping has previously 
approved subdivisions with completions 
expected in 2007 and 2008. We recently 
welcomed our new building inspector Paul 
Harvey, who was hired to replace longtime 
building inspector Kevin Kelley, who made 
a career move to Hampton Falls. We thank 
Kevin and wish him success. 

As with most communities in New 
Hampshire, Epping faces the challenges of 
balancing services and education against 
the local tax rate. With the 10% tax in- 
crease in 2006, the Board is continually 
challenged by the needs of all. The Town 
revaluation in 2005 saw our town's value 
rise, which unhappily, resulted in a drop in 
state aid. The Town's portion of your tax 
dollar is only 14%, while the School por- 
tion is 81%. Each taxpayer has a say in de- 
termining what the final tax rate will be, by 
participating in the voting process. 

Again, we would like to thank the 
emergency personnel of the Town of 
Epping. This year, with the floods and the 
other incidents, we were even more aware 
of the hard work the police officers, volun- 
teer firefighters, paramedics and EMT's do 
for our town. 

In closing, we also want to thank our 
community members for working together 
to make Epping a great community. 

Epping Board of Selectmen: 

Tom Gauthier, Chair 
Susan McGeough 
Kim Sullivan 
Jerry Langdon 
Jeffrey Harris 



Cemetery Trustees 

The cemetery Trustees are responsible for 
the care of 29 cemeteries in Epping. This 
past summer, 26 of the smaller plots were 
each cleaned once in the early summer. The 
other three larger cemeteries (Central, Jones 



and West Epping) were cleaned and mowed 
several times during the summer. Bids were 
received and accepted in April from two in- 
dividuals who did an excellent job. 

Our budget request remains the same 
this year as last. Anyone who is interested 
in bidding to do the cemetery maintenance 
is invited to do so. Bid forms will be avail- 
able at the Selectmen's Office during the 
month of April. 

Daniel Harvey 
Paul Ladd 
Marilyn Perry 



Conservation 
Commission 

2006 was another busy year for the Con- 
servation Commission. The highlight of 
the year was the annual canoe race on the 
Lamprey. We had nearly 100 people out 
and great weather (for a change), and every- 
body had a good time! Thanks to all who 
came to participate, and a special thanks to 
all who helped continue the tradition. This 
year's race is scheduled for the last Saturday 
in April. We hope to see you there! 

The Conservation Commission in 
2006 also accepted 50 acres or so of forest 
as part of the Planning Board's new open- 
space subdivision ordinance. This land 
abuts the existing Lamprey River Forest, 
and should provide a great place to play and 
explore for kids who will grow up nearby. If 
you haven't visited this, or one of Epping's 
other open areas, you should. Several sites 
are highlighted on a brochure that remains 
available at the town hall. 

And finally, the Commission reviewed 
a variety of development plans and wet- 
lands fill applications. 2007 is already un- 
derway, so if you're interested in helping, or 
have a project you'd like to start, please let 
us know. New faces are always welcome! 

Greg Tillman 
John Bennett 
Amos Clapp 
Jeff Conrad 
Sonja Gonzalez 
Scott Pirn 



Budget Committee 

Growth. Change. We have certainly seen 
both in Epping this year. Lowe's arrived 
and Wal-Mart setded in, surrounded by 
new businesses large and small. We broke 
ground on a much-needed middle school 
addition. Residential development contin- 
ued, slowed only by a drop in the regional 
real estate market at year's end. 

Change is good. Growth is necessary. 

But with this change come growing 
pains and here in Epping, we have expe- 
rienced our share in 2006. With the new 
school addition come bond payments. With 
the department stores come more police 
and fire calls. With residential development 
come additional roads to plow and repair. 
Many of our residents, especially those who 
have been here the longest, have been hurt 
by these growing pains. It's been a big ad- 
justment. 

Our job on the Budget Committee is 
much like a scale, weighing what the town 
needs against what it can afford. Not ev- 
eryone will agree on the balance point. We 
don't always agree on it ourselves, but we 
work together to do the best job we can for 
Epping. 

We started early this year. Having re- 
ceived many calls and comments about the 
recent tax increases, we took steps to im- 
part upon both the town and the school 
the necessity of reducing their costs and in- 
creasing revenues. We urged the adminis- 
trators to carefully review health care costs 
and use these reviews in upcoming contract 
negotiations. We encouraged a committee 
to tackle the solid waste problem, thereby 
increasing recycling revenue and reduc- 
ing hauling fees at the transfer station. We 
asked all departments to hold their spend- 
ing as close to level as possible, and they lis- 
tened. Finally, we have urged the selectmen 
to tell our state representatives to raise their 
voices on our behalf about school funding, 
legal and other costs that are beyond the 
town's control. 

We believe that the budgets for 2007 
are as low as they can be while maintain- 
ing the services people need and improving 
those they want. We are here to serve the 
taxpayers and we welcome your input. Our 
meetings are generally held on the third 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. 
Check us out on Channel 22 ot come down 
to speak with us in person. Most impor- 
tantly, please come to the deliberative ses- 
sions in February and vote on March 13. 
Remember — it's YOUR budget. 

James P. McGeough, Chair 

Brenda McCartney, Vice Chair 

Jeff Harris, Selectmen's Representative 

JeffLeDuc, School Board Representative 

Liz Conrad 

Michelle Cromarty 

Mike King 

Marc Nickerson 

Amy Randall 

PaulSpidle 



Fire Department 

Please let me start by thanking all the resi- 
dents of Epping for their continued out- 
standing support of the Fire Department 
this year. The members of the department 
truly appreciate your kind words and unfal- 



tering support. By supporting your volun- 
teer Fire department, you save the town the 
many hundreds of thousands of dollars it 
would cost to have paid full time coverage 
24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 

Our volunteer membership is down 
from last years all time high. We still have 
a core of very dedicated Fire Fighters and 
EMTs that is adequate to meet today's 
needs but now may be the time for your 
to call the station for information about 
volunteering (679-5446) or email Chief_ 
Toomire@comcast.net We have opportu- 
nities for you to help out as an EMT or a 
Fire Fighter and we pay for all training and 
supply all necessary protective clothing. If 
you can't see yourself filling one of these 
positions, there are other roles that need to 
be filled and you should still call to find out 
about them. 

In 2006 you voted to support the pur- 
chase of a new Ambulance which went into 
service in August. We now proudly serve 
you with three Ambulances, one of which 
is maintained in Station 2 in West Epping. 
Having an Ambulance on that end of town 



has really helps us to better serve residents of 
West Epping with reduced response times. 
Additionally, having three ambulances is 
more and more of a necessity in our grow- 
ing town. There are many instances when 
we have overlapping calls or need multiple 
ambulances at an accident. 

The Fire Department was called a total 
of 946 times in 2006. There were 285 fire 
calls and 661 ambulance calls. 

Our Explorer post continues to thrive 
and now has 19 youth members. The Ex- 
ploring program is part of the Boy Scouts 
of America and gives young men and wom- 
en age 14 to 18 the opportunity to explore 
different careers. 

We would like all residents to please 
be sure you have your house number dis- 
played in such a manner that is clearly 
visible from the road. Finally, please re- 
member to change your smoke detector 
batteries when you change your clocks, 
spring and fall. We sometimes have smoke 
detectors donated to the department and 
have a small number available to the public 
at no charge. If you don't have a working 




Epping Fire Department — Memorial Day 2006 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



E| 

Name 


pping Fh 

Certification 


•e Department — 60 Membei 

Serving Since Name 


rs 

Certification 


Serving Since 


Antoz, Jason 


FF/AA 


06/04 


Merchant, Rob 


FF 


11/05 


Antoz, Jennifer 


FF/AA 


09/05 


Murphy, Chris 


AA 


12/72 


Arneil, Amanda 


AA 


01/04 


Nickerson, Marc 


FF/AA 


09/01 


Arneil, Steve 


FF/AA 


12/03 


Oakes, Dee 


AA 


07/01 


Bailey, Jerry 


FF/AA 


07/05 


Oakes, Don 


FF/AA 


01/00 


Bennis, Dan 


FF/AA 


04/85 


Page, Joan 


AA 


03/02 


Bodge, Cheryl 


AA 


03/92 


Phelps, Wit 


FF/AA 


06/05 


Bodge, Joe 


FF 


06/02 


Pickering, Suzanne 


FF 


07/05 


Brown, Kathy 


AA 


04/06 


Porter, Jim 


FF 


06/04 


Carter, Donna 


AA 


02/88 


Rodier, Amy 


FF/AA 


03/00 


Castine, Heather 


FF 


06/04 


Rodier, Laurel 


AA 


08/02 


Chapman, Bruce 


FF/AA 


01/04 


Rodier, Richard 


FF 


09/02 


Childsjohn 


AA 


07/02 


Saad, Steve 


FF 


08/06 


Childs, Shirley 


AA 


08/02 


Santerre, Rich 


FF 


09/05 


Clough, Craig 


FF/AA 


01/03 


Stowell, Lori 


AA 


11/04 


Cray, Cliff 


FF 


04/79 


Tibbits, Rob 


FF 


05/06 


DeSotto, John 


FF/AA 


05/97 


Toomire, Brian 


FF/AA 


10/90 


DeSotto, Nancy 


AA 


09/03 


Tuttle, Chris 


FF/AA 


02/04 


Downie, Robert 


FF/AA 


04/81 


VanAmburgh, Don 


FF 


08/97 


Drapeau, Jamie 


AA 


04/04 


Webb, Bill 


FF 


11/05 


Dulin, Danielle 


AA 


12/03 


Wells, Scott 


AA 


09/98 


Frederick, Crys 


AA 


01/04 


Woithe, Janet 


AA 


09/04 


Frederick, Glenn 


FF/AA 


09/01 


Woithe, Jen 


AA 


03/05 


Fredrick, Josh 


FF 


03/05 


Zukas, Kevin 


FF/AA 


08/88 


Frey, Harold 


FF/AA 


11/04 


Fire Explorers: 

Arsenault, Marrisa 
Bartlett, Kristen 
Butler, Jared 
Chapman, Kaitlyn 
Clough, Andrew 
Desotto, Kristine 
Floyd, Micheal 
Fredericks, Jocelyn 
Fuller, Zach 
Hajaboom, Micheal 
Harris, Andrew 
Hill, Ashley 
Hill, Heather 
Horton,Levi 
Loscascio, Jesse 
Loiselle, Kevin 


McFadden, Ryan 
Nadeau, Anthony 
Rice, Jay 
Rowell, David 
Standen, Micheal 
Tangney, Brendon 
Toomire, Rebecca 
Zukas, Brian 

Fire Wards: 

Cantraii, Richard 
Goodspeed, Charles 
Oakes Sr, Don 

Selectmen's Rep: 

Tom Gauthier 


Fuller, Jeremy 


FF 


03/06 


Garrant, Chris 


FF 


09/03 


Holmes, Greg 


FF/AA 


07/05 


LaRochelle, Amanda 


FF/AA 


08/03 


LaRochelle, Steve 


FF/AA 


08/03 


Letourneau, Hank 


EMS 


04/81 


Levesque, Brad 


FF 


06/04 


Levesque, Donna 


FF/AA 


05/04 


Locascio, Bob 


FF/AA 


10/98 


Louis, Karen 


AA 


08/88 


McCormack, Barbara 


AA 


06/04 













2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



smoke detector, please call the station. My 
wishes go out to all of you for a safe and 
prosperous year. 

Respectfully, 

Brian Toomire, Fire Chief 



General Assistance 
(Welfare) Department 

Another year has come and gone, and as 
in the past I've shared with you the many 
resources that are available to our Epping 
residents who are unable to provide for 
themselves and their families. The Town 
of Epping New Hampshire provides assis- 
tance to qualified individuals for basic liv- 
ing needs in accordance with State Statute 
RSA:165 implies that, "If a person is poor 
and unable to maintain himself or herself" 
the Town has no other choice but to as- 
sist. The Town's welfare was established 
to ensure that those residents who have a 
real need for financial assistance can obtain 
funding from the Town in an appropriate 
manner. The objective of the Town's wel- 
fare is to provide assistance to those who 
qualify, and to assist them in obtaining 
long-term financial security through other 
available resources. 

The Food Pantry is available year- 
round to serve those in need. To visit the 
food pantry, please call my office or come 
in to see me so I can reach the appropriate 
person to help you. Because I am aware of 
other resources such as federal programs, 
state programs, county assistance programs 
I am able to direct the people of Epping 
with resources that serve the needs of the 
poor as well as the budgetary needs of the 
town. There is Rockingham Community 
Action Program which has been a signifi- 
cant resource in meeting the needs of our 
residents. 

I have many brochures for infor- 
mation on the Legal Advice & Referral 
Centers, Families First, Healthy Kids, 
and Senior Prescription Discount Pilot 
Programs, and Shelters. The Compass 
Program is still going strong. This is a 
program to help the unemployed or un- 
deremployed develop skills that will lead 




New and improved Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library Sign 



to self-sufficiency and ofFer job-training 
services. 

If you feel that you or your family 
needs assistance or information how to re- 
ceive assistance, please do not hesitate to 
call my office at 679-1202, ext. 114. My 
office hours for appointments are Wednes- 
day, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Phyllis E. McDonough 
Welfare Administrator 



Harvey-Mitchell 
Memorial Library 

This year the library has continued to pro- 
vide new programs, services, and resources. 
These efforts were again met with greater 
annual library usage. The number of people 
who visited the library and borrowed mate- 
rials was greater in each month than in the 
corresponding months of the previous year. 

After our first full year with three new 
public computers, computer use also saw 
a dramatic rise with a 65% increase over 
2005. 

Further changes to our technology 
services included the purchase of a new 
photocopier. The new machine is also the 
networked laser printer for the library, pro- 
ducing better quality prints. 

After nearly two years without any staff 
turnover, the library lost David Berube as 
Library Student Assistant. The position was 
filled by Epping High School junior Tara 
Davidson. 



Programs such as Toy Play Day, Scrab- 
ble Club, Senior Citizen Tea, and Artist of 
the Month were introduced this year while 
others, such as Pajama Night and Preschool 
Storyhour, increased in frequency. 

We joined with other groups in town, 
namely the Epping Conservation Commis- 
sion and the Epping Garden Club, to host 
special speakers at the library. We also took 
advantage of our local professionals, host- 
ing several speakers who donated their time 
and expertise. This year we were also the 
recipients of a New Hampshire Humanities 
Council grant, which allowed us to host a 
slide presentation and lecture. 

Another new addition to library pro- 
gramming this year was a public perfor- 
mance movie license. During the April and 
December school breaks, we were able to 
show weekly movie series, as well as show- 
ing movies at other events such as the Sum- 
mer Reading Program. This new program- 
ming vehicle was further expanded at the 
end of the year with a grant from the Wal- 
Mart Supercenter, which allowed us to buy 
new equipment. 

There were changes to our facilities as 
well this year. We purchased a new library 
sign, which adds to the face value of the 
library, enhances the look of the down- 
town area, and provides us with an ad- 
ditional means of advertising our events. 
The tile floor of the lower level entrance- 
way was repaired, removing cracked and 
faded tiles. Picture moulding was added 
upstairs, allowing the library to host sev- 
eral Epping artists in rotating monthly 
exhibits. 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



■ ' " ' \.'-W:' !■■..■-' W/J' ■■-•■" - s- ■'■■-'■ '■'■' ', - 




'P1CHARD & RACHEL *.;.., 

, SANBORN- . ' 



ife: 










Richard and Rachel Sanborn dedication stone 

The pink dogwood purchased in honor 
of Richard and Rachel Sanborn was trans- 
formed into the center of a small garden 
planted by the Epping Girl Scouts. The 
area was completed with a carved stone rec- 
ognizing the couple and was dedicated in 
their honor on Memorial Day. 

The Friends of the Library, in addition 
to their long standing fundraising and sup- 
port activities, ran a very creative raffle of 
sought after items: tickets to hear best sell- 
ing, local author Dan Brown at the Music 
Hall this year. They also hosted a successful 
antiques appraisal event and their Second 
Annual Holiday Auction. 

On behalf of the Board of Trustees 
and Staff, I would like to thank the citizens 
of Epping for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Amanda Reynolds Cooper, Director 



Historic District 
Commission 



Members: Steve Colby 
(Co-Chair), Pam Currier, 
Julie DiTursi-McPhee, Leo 
Grimard, Nancy Grimard, 
Susan V McGeough 
(Selectman's Rep.), Forrest 
True, Joy True (Secretary) and 
Madelyn Williamson (Co- 
Chair). 

The Historic District is 
marked by signs and generally 
covers the areas east and west 
on Water and Pleasant Streets 
and north and south Main Street. 

Established in 1979 and working to- 
gether with the Planning Board, we strive: 

"To preserve and enhance the valued 
character and history of our downtown 






msm-m 



Library Stats for 2006 

Items Circulated 27,347 

Interlibrary Loans 1,016 

Attendance 15,729 

Computer Uses 3,470 

New Items 2,107 

(books, audio books, videos, 
and magazines) 



This past year in addition to review 
of several building and signage proposals 
within the district, we implemented the 
community effort which has resulted in 
the full renovation of the DAR Park, now 
complete for everyone to enjoy. The War 
Memorial monument is cleaned and land- 
scaped, three granite benches installed as 
is fencing duplicated from vintage photos. 
We gratefully acknowledge the supporters 
and contributors of this project. They are 
the American Legion, the Goodrich Brick- 
yard, Garden Center of Epping, Wal-Mart, 
Epping Highway Department, Epping 
Cemetery Preservation and the Epping 
Conservation Commission. 

Again this year we suggested a "Spirit 
of the Season Display" to all residents and 
places of business within the historic dis- 
trict with great results. 

Look for a vintage directional sign 
reproduction at the Four Corners. It will 
certainly show you the more scenic ways to 
Manchester and Portsmouth! 

In our faster changing community the 
role of this Commission will become more 
active and evident. We will always appreci- 
ate your interest, input and support. 

For further information contact any 





2006 Police Repo 

Crime 2005 2006 , 


rt 

% 

hange 

-5% 

+3% 

+61% 

-23% 




Homicide 


1 


1 




Kidnapping 


1 


2 




Sex Crimes 


11 


13 




Robbery 





2 




Assaults 


64 


63 




Criminal Threatening 


25 


23 




Arson 


1 


2 




Burglary 


27 


25 




Shoplifting 


16 


13 




Theft 


36 


42 




Larceny 


48 


51 




Purse Snatching 





1 




Family Offenses 
(Non-Violent) 





14 




Loitering 





1 




Motor VehicleTheft 


7 


9 




Counterfeiting/ 
Forqery 


5 


4 




Theft of Services 


62 


40 




Credit Card Fraud 


8 


5 




Criminal Mischief 


113 


114 




Drug Violations 


47 


35 




Pornography 


2 







Weapons Violations 





1 




Bad Checks 


87 


30 




Disorderly Conduct 


26 


41 




DWI 


42 


64 




Drunkenness 


47 


67 




Family Offenses 


4 


16 




Liquor Law Offense 


38 


90 




Runaways 


12 


11 




Criminal Trespass 


14 


30 




Other Offenses 


228 


118 




Totals 


972 


928 












Felonies 


104 


107 




Arrests 


316 


508 




Acddents 


240 


195 




Calls for Service 


7,920 


7,619 


-4% 




Comparison for 11/30/05-11/30/06 







2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



member listed above, Meetings 7:00 p.m. 
at the Town Hall the last Tuesday of every 
month. We welcome you! 

Submitted, 
Madelyn Williamson 



Planning Board 

In 2006 the Board welcomed newly elected 
member, Mike Morasco. Also, the Board 
would like to thank Steve Illsley for serv- 
ing on the Board as an elected member 
for three years. Robert Graham remained 
Chairman, Cory McPhee Vice-Chairman, 
Mike Morasco Treasurer, Greg Tillman as 
Secretary, and Alternate Steve Colby. Susan 
McGeough was appointed to serve as the 
Selectmen's Representative, with Kim Sul- 
livan serving as the Selectmen's Alternate. 
Circuit Rider/Planner, Clay Mitchell, and 
the Planning Board Assistant is Phyllis Mc- 
Donough. 

In 2006 the Board has reviewed and 
approved Nine Subdivision applications 
totaling 149 single-family lots, Twelve Site 
Plan reviews, and Three Lot Line Adjust- 
ments. 

All contacts and issues relating to 
planning in the Town of Epping should 
be forwarded to the Town Planner, Clay 
Mitchell for long-range planning related is- 
sues. Generally scheduled office hours for 
the Planner are Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday, contacting the Planning Board 



Secretary at 679-1202, ext. 114 will insure 
a meeting with the Planner. 

In response to the growth of the Town, 
the Board has continued its work on updates 
to the Master Plan, the regulations and sev- 
eral new zoning amendment proposals. We 
appreciate your attention to zoning matters 
at the town meeting and election. 

The entire Board as always wishes to 
thank the citizens of Epping for their con- 
tinued support, interest, and input we re- 
ceived throughout the year. Please continue 
to let us know how we're doing. 

We thank you for your commitment 
and continued service. 

Officers: Robert Graham, III, Cory 
McPhee, Greg Tillman, Mike Morasco, and 
Selectmen's Representative Susan McGeough. 
Alternate Steve Colby. 

Planner Clay Mitchell, and Planning Board 
Assistant Phyllis McDonough. 



Police Department 

On behalf of the Epping Police Depart- 
ment I want to thank the residents of this 
town for their continued support of our 
department. We value your thoughts and 
ideas and encourage you to please call or 
stop by anytime to voice your concerns. I 
want to begin this year by citing some of 
the personnel changes here at the depart- 
ment. Jodie Kimball left to pursue other 



interests and we thank her for her service 
and wish her well. She has been replaced 
with Carol Ann Bonenfant who is a resi- 
dent of Epping. She brings with her many 
years of experience and in her short time 
here she has proven to be a quick learner 
and valued employee. We look forward to 
having Carol Ann here for many years to 
come and are glad to have her as part of 
the team. In addition, the voters approved 
the hiring of our thirteenth full-time police 
officer. After a lengthy hiring process we 
hired Seth Tondreault of Rockport, MA. 
Officer Tondreault is an excellent hire for 
this department. He will do well, and we 
wish him a long and safe law enforcement 
career. And finally, we hired the services of 
Attorney Heather Newell to be our part- 
time prosecutor. Although she is a new at- 
torney, she has a great deal of experience 
both in preparing and presenting cases in 
a court of law. 

The police department showed a four 
(4) percent decrease in the number of calls 
for service and a five (5) percent decrease 
in the number of reported crime. However, 
the seriousness of the crimes is on the in- 
crease by three (3) percent. One statistic 
that really stands out is in the number of 
arrests made in 2006, a total of 509 arrests 
were made which is a 61% increase over the 
same period in 2005, that number being 
316. You are all aware of the high-profile 
murder case that was reported in March. 
That homicide investigation was the larg- 
est crime scene area ever searched in this 




Flooding on Mother's Day Weekend damaged roads. 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 




State's history and the NH State Police 
Major Crime Scene Unit was on site for a 
record eighteen days. I want to thank my 
entire department for their assistance dur- 
ing that period of time and also want to 
thank the NH Attorney General's Office 
and NH State Police. They were truly a 
pleasure to work with and we appreciate 
their expertise and guidance. Fortunately, 
we don't see many of these types of cases, 
but it is reassuring to know that our State 
agencies are ready to assist at a moment's 
notice. 

A full listing of crimes, arrests, acci- 
dents, and calls for service are listed in the 
box on page 18. 

During the Mother's Day floods, that 
affected most of New Hampshire, our de- 
partment was kept very busy. Our fire de- 
partment and highway department did a 
phenomenal job in keeping up with the de- 
mands of all emergency services. The pho- 
tos on page 19 and 20 depict some of the 
scenes from that weekend. 

Thanks to the efforts of Lieutenant 
Michael Wallace, the department re- 
ceived numerous grants to conduct spe- 
cialized patrols and acquire much needed 
equipment. Our biggest project was the 
introduction of wireless communications 
within the police cruisers. Each patrol ve- 
hicle is now equipped with a laptop com- 
puter where officers can enter their own 
motor vehicle listings, driving records 
and instant warrant checks from the car. 
In addition, officers can complete all re- 
ports from the field as well eliminating 



the need to return to the station during 
their shifts. Our goal is to have maximum 
visibility on the road and minimize sta- 
tion time. 

Officers were also mandated to com- 
plete training. Each officer learned the 
effectiveness of establishing command 
during different scenarios presented by 
our instructors. A model city was used 
to illustrate either a bank robbery, haz- 
ardous material accident, or other emer- 
gency. Officers reenacted the procedures 
they may experience to insure sufficient 
emergency personnel were called to the 
scene. This training was well received and 
engages police officers to interact with fire 
and medical personnel when called to a 
crisis. This two-day training was neces- 
sary in order to qualify for future Federal 
grants. All of the overtime costs incurred 
by the department were reimbursed to the 
Town. 

In closing, our Town has welcomed 
new businesses during the past year and 
more are to follow. Each new business 
deserves our protection and as always, we 
will do our best to respond to their needs. I 
encourage you to call us whenever you feel 
it is necessary. All the officers stand ready 
to serve you. On behalf of the staff of the 
Epping Police Department we wish you a 
safe 2007. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Gregory C. Dodge, Chief 
Epping Police Department 



Recreation Department 

Two thousand and six has been another 
wonderful year for the Epping Recreation 
Department. We experienced substantial 
program growth, resulting in a dramatic 
increase in revenue. This year we collected 
over one hundred and six thousand dollars 
in program fees, the highest amount ever 
generated in the Recreation Departments 
history. The Rockingham County Incen- 
tive Funds contributed over thirty thou- 
sand dollars towards financial assistance 
for children attending the after-school and 
summer programs. We would also like to 
extend our gratitude to the McPhee fam- 
ily for their generous contributions towards 
our financial assistance program. 

The creation of the before-school pro- 
gram in the spring of 2006, helped con- 
tribute to the increase in revenue for the 
department. AmeriCorps member Sharon 
Harvey and program coordinator Tracey 
Young did a wonderful job of splitting their 
time between the before and after school 
programs. Tracy was also one of the stars 
of the Epping Rec. music video which was 
created at the Recreation Department and 
aired on the ETV network. Thank you to 
all of those who helped in the creation of 
this video. 

Our largest growth occurred in the 
summer program. We had well over one 
hundred participants enrolled in the pro- 
gram. The average daily attendance was 
around 65 elementary aged children. Kathy 
Channell returned to the program and did 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 




A city model being used to train police officers for emergency scenarios. 



a marvelous job of juggling all of her du- 
ties as the program director. The Skyhawks 
sports camps were added to the summer 
programming choices and the Littlefield 
Tennis Network returned to offer six weeks 
of tennis lessons. Both programs were a 
success and will be returning in 2007. The 
middle-school summer adventure program 
was offered for the second year. We had five 
weeks of fun, with trips to the rock gym 
in Manchester and bike trips to Pawtucka- 
way State Park. The program was limited to 
only day trips due to the cost of transporta- 
tion. We hope to be able to offer overnight 
hiking and canoeing trips in the summer 
of 2007. 

This fall brought many new faces to 
Watson Academy. The 35 children that at- 
tended the after-school program pushed 
the program to the building's capac- 
ity. Retired school teacher, Gerry Russell, 
stepped up to coordinate the program. A 
few of the summer staff continued work- 
ing through this fall providing a higher 
level of continuity to the after-school pro- 
gram. Watson Academy has served the 
elementary school children well, but we 
must look to expand our partnership at 
the school for our program to continue to 
grow in 2007. 

With the New Year we look for growth 
in the areas of middle-school, family and 
Senior Citizen programming. For these 
groups we hope to offer more trips to lo- 
cal New England attractions. We also are 
focusing on improving the overall quality 



of the summer and after-school programs. 
In 2007 we will be continuing with some 
annual events like the Egg Hunt (March 
31st), the Pepsi, Pitch, Hit and Run event 
and Hershey Track and Field competition 
(both in the late Spring). We also look to 
expand the Yoga and Ti Chi programs, 
while adding new programs like Kinder 
Musik, TumbleBus and pre-school t-ball. 
The department is always open to new ideas 
and willing to offer creative programming. 



If you have a skill that you would like to 
share, please let us know. 

This year the Department will be co- 
ordinating an initiative to allow public 
access on a trail corridor that connects 
from the Epping Schools to north side of 
Pawtuckaway State Park. We are looking 
for the support of volunteers to make this 
goal a reality. Please contact the Recre- 
ation office if you would like to get in- 
volved with this project or any questions 




On August 15, Epping Rec. brought 64 children to Canobie Lake Park. 
Can you find yourself in this photo? Happy hunting, see you this summer! 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



that you might have in regards to out 
programs. We can be reached Monday 
thru Friday; our office hours are 9-2:30. 
You can either reach us at 679-3301 or by 
email at rec@townofepping.com or stop 
on by Watson Academy. Get involved 
with the Recreation Department, you will 
love it! 



Town Clerk's Report 

The State implemented a State-wide voter 
checklist in 2006 which should prevent 
voters from being on the checklist in more 
than one Town. Grace Lavoie, chairman 
of the Supervisors of the Checklist, as 
well as Joyce Blanchard and myself spent 
many hours converting our old records to 
the new format. The State also distributed 
special voting booths for voters with phys- 
ical disabilities or those who are vision im- 
paired. We were able to try out these new 
innovations at the elections held in Sep- 
tember and November. Due to construc- 
tion at the Middle High School, fall elec- 
tions needed to be held in other locations. 
Due to low voter turn out we were able to 
hold the September election at the Town 
Hall. The November election, however, 
was much larger and the Fire Department 



graciously allowed us to use their facility. 
Many thanks to them for all the help they 
gave us. 

Looking ahead for 2007, we will be 
going on line with the State for Motor Ve- 
hicle Registrations. This will allow us to 
issue more different kinds of plates (van- 
ity, Moose, Farm), and process late renew- 
als as well as vehicles with a GVW of up 
to 26,000. We hope the added services 
will make it more convenient for Epping 
residents, but will take some adjustment 
on our part to become familiar with the 
new computer system. To avoid lines at the 
Town Hall we encourage residents who 
are simply renewing a registration to take 
advantage of registrations by mail, or the 
online system accessed through the Town 
Website. 

Linda Foley 
Town Clerk 



Water & Sewer 
Commission 

During the past year the Epping Water 
& Sewer Dept. has provided more water 
than ever before to the Town. We are av- 



■ 

■ 


rhe Town Clerk's Office had the following activity during the period of 
lanuary 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006: 

Motor Vehicle Permits Issued 8,428 $955,963.28 






Municipal Agent Transactions 




6,795 


16,987.50 






E-Reg Transactions 




138 


346.80 






Dog Licenses 




679 


4,206.50 






Dump Permits 




3,094 


15,466.00 






Marriage Licenses 




32 


1,440.00 






Vital Records Certificates 




147 


1,697.00 
1,740.00 






UCC Filings 










Miscellaneous 




1,832.01 






Total Remitted to Treasurer 






999,679.09 

















eraging over 130K gpd.(gallons per day) 
Our maximum legal capacity is about 
155K gpd. We currently pump most of 
our water from the two wells at Hoar's 
Pond and supplement that with about 
20% from the Fremont Rd well site. As a 
result we are actively pursuing additional 
water sources. We are limited because a 
new well needs to be near the existing pip- 
ing and have sufficient capacity to justify 
our investment. Wells that pump more 
than lOOgpm are not that common and 
we must also secure a protective radius of 
400' around them. The other obvious is- 
sue is that we cannot drill in an area with 
contaminated ground water. The MTBE 
in the ground water in certain areas of 
Town has not been removed by the NH 
Dept. Of Environmental Services, nor is 
it apparently likely that they will do any- 
thing to correct the situation. 

The capacity at the sewer lagoons has 
been improved and we should soon be 
relicensed for 500K gpd. We have made 
significant investments to improve the op- 
eration and to make sure that the Epping 
Water & Sewer Dept. received the system 
that it paid for. We produce the cleanest ef- 
fluent in the state from a sewage treatment 
plant, in part because we discharge into 
the Lamprey River, a wild and scenic river. 
Perhaps the highest hurdle before us is the 
infiltration of ground water when it rains 
and sump pumps which discharge into the 
system. This past summer we spent over 
$12000.00 sealing manholes from infil- 
tration. We will continue to do this. Sump 
pumps are a more troublesome problem. 
When discharged into the sewer system a 
single pump can easily pump 5000 gpd. 
When you factor in numerous houses you 
can easily see how fast this can become a 
significant problem. We pump on average 
about 130K gpd of water which should 
mean that we receive about that much 
sewage daily but during a wet spell in the 
spring there are days when we receive over 
400K gpd of sewage (mostly just water) 
but we have to process it just the same. 
While not all of this is from sump pumps 
a lot of it is. Our system gets overwhelmed 
and we are at risk of violating our EPA 
discharge permits. If you have a wet cellar 
and you have a sump pump please run the 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



• 


2006 Water and Sewer Connection Fees Collected 








Source 


Water 


Sewer 






Telly's Restaurant 


$9,250 








Hurlbert Toyota 


31,200 


$16,550 






McDonald's 


13,250 








Athen's Pizza 


2,500 


2,500 






L Dionne 


3,000 








NH DES Pine and Pond 


200,000 








Totals 


$259,200 


$19,050 




Total Water and Sewer: $278,250 



discharge hose outside and not into the 
sewer system. 

This year we plan to replace some of 
the older pipe we have in the system. We 
still have Wz galvanized pipe that is 40 
years old supplying parts of the Town. We 
will also be doing our routine maintenance 
and planning for the major maintenance 
issues. We have quotes to paint the old wa- 
ter tower for about $250K. We need to put 
some money aside for this. 

As new users come on the system we 
charge them a connection fee which helps 
pay for the construction and development 
of the system. The new water tower for 
example was paid for by connection fees 
from those businesses that needed it most, 
though we all benefit from it. In the future 
we will try to manage our costs and insure 
that everyone pays their fair share for the 
infrastructure we have in place. 

Joseph Foley, Chairman 
Henry Deboer 
Mike King 



Zoning Board of 
Adjustment 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment consists 
of five elected members: Chairman Paul 
Langdon, Jr., Vice Chairman Dave Mylott, 



Thomas Dwyer, Jr., Bob Jordan, and Paul 
Spidle. The Board would like to thank last 
year's members, Ron LaChance and Dick 
Fisher for serving on the Board. The Zoning 
Board Secretary is Phyllis McDonough. 

In 2006, the ZBA heard Sixteen re- 
quests for Variances Fifteen were granted, 
One denied. There were Three Special Ex- 
ceptions granted, and Three requests for 
rehearing, Two of the requests to rehear 
were denied and One was granted. 

New Hampshire law strictly controls 
the actions of ZBA Boards in the state. By 
law a ZBA can only grant three kinds of re- 
quests: an appeal of a previous administra- 
tive decision regarding the meaning of the 
Town Ordinance; a request for a Special 
Exception (if it meets all the specific con- 
ditions of the Town Ordinance), and re- 
quest for a Variance from the literal word- 
ing of the ordinance — if\t meets five tests 
spelled out in state law. Therefore, your 
Zoning Board of Adjustment earnestly 
asks every person considering an appeal to 
read Epping's Zoning Ordinance care- 
fully beforehand, and to refrain front 
submitting any request which cannot 
be granted within these laws. By so do- 
ing they will save themselves time, expense 
and frustration. 

For example, Epping's Zoning Ordi- 
nance states that certain uses are permitted 
by Special Exception in the Aquifer Protec- 
tion District, provided they will not pollute 



the aquifer, significantly reduce the volume 
of water which it contains, or discharge 
hazardous materials on site. It is the ZBA's 
responsibility to decide whether or not a re- 
quest meets these conditions. If the ZBA 
finds all the conditions have been met, it 
must grant the request; if it finds even one 
condition is not met, under the law it can- 
not grant it. 

If a variance is requested, by State law 
the ZBA can grant it only if all five criteria 
are met: 

• Value of surrounding properties 
would not be reduced. 

• Granting the appeal would be in the 
public interest. 

• Denying the appeal would effectively 
prevent the owner from making any 
reasonable use of the land. 

• By granting the appeal substantial 
justice would be done. 

• The use must not be contrary to 
the "spirit and intent" of the zoning 
ordinance. The courts have ruled 
"when an ordinance contains a 
restriction against a particular use of 
the land, The ZBA would violate the 
spirit and intent by permitting that 



The principle underlying these laws 
is only the voters have power to change 
their zoning ordinance. No ZBA has this 
power. 

Members have the ability to attend law 
lectures for Zoning Boards sponsored by the 
New Hampshire Municipal Association. 

The Board would like to remind the 
public that the Zoning Board of Adjust- 
ment meets as needed and all meetings are 
televised on EPTV. The Board also invites 
the public to attend the meetings. 

"Your Zoning Board of Adjustment" 

Officers: 

Paul Langdon, Jr. 
Dave Mylott 
Thomas Dwyer, Jr. 
Bob Jordan 
Paul Spidle 



Zoning Board Secretary, 
Phyllis McDonough 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Financial Reports 

Tax Collector's Report MS-61 

Year Ending 12-31-2006 



Debits 



2006 



2005 



2004 2003 & Prior 



Uncollected Taxes at Beginning of Year 


Property Taxes 




1,139,925 








Timber Tax 




1,937 








Land Use Change Tax 




500 








Tax Liens 




116,300 


47,607 


4,349 




Water Billing 




32,104 








Sewer Billing 




62,362 









Taxes Committed This Year 


Property Taxes 


11,620,214 


18,140 








Land Use Change Tax 


467,000 










Timber Tax 


3,693 










Tax Lien Executed 


543,382 










Water Billing 


133,062 










Sewer Billing 


255,863 










Water Connection Fee 


200,000 











Overpayment/Refunds 



Property Taxes 
Land Use Charge Tax 



31,903 



80,165 
175 



Interest & Penalties Charged 


Interest ForTaxes 


11,057 


47,217 








Penalties For Taxes 


225 


6,263 








Interest For Tax Liens 


12,694 


11,665 


12,703 


562 




Interest For Water 


265 


416 








Interest For Sewer 


519 
15 


860 








Bad Check Fees 


75 








Shut Off Fee 











Total Debits 



$13,279,892 $1,518,104 $60,310 



$4,911 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Credits 


2006 


2005 


2004 


2003 & Prior 




Remitted To Treasurer 


Property Taxes 


10,523,021 


614,173 








Land Use Change Tax 


318,000 


675 








Timber Tax 


3,396 


7 








Taxes Converted To Lien 




512,122 








Tax Liens Redeemed 


292,645 


67,035 


45,788 


2,217 




Interest For Taxes 


11,057 


47,217 








Interest ForTax Liens 


12,694 


11,665 


12,703 


562 




Penalties ForTaxes 


225 


6,263 








Water Billing 


92,597 


31,941 








Sewer Billing 


176,818 


61,919 








Water Connection Fee 


200,000 










Interest For Water 


265 


416 








Interest For Sewer 


519 


860 








Bad Check Fees 




75 








Shut Off Fee 


15 










Adjustments Made 


To Adjust Out Small Balances and Bad Checks 


(15,317) 


(6,393) 








Abatements Made 


Property Taxes 


60,537 


120,258 








Yield 


297 










Land Use Change Tax 


5,000 










Tax Liens 


81,267 










Water Billing 


145 










Sewer Billing 


298 










Taxes Deeded To Town 


Property Taxes 


1,823 










Tax Liens 


3,867 


1,776 


1,819 






Uncollected Taxes at End of Year 


Property Taxes 


1,081,642 










Land Use ChangeTax 


144,000 










Property Tax Liens 


166,014 


47,489 




2,132 




Water Billing 


40,320 


163 








Sewer Billing 


78,747 


443 








Total Credits 


$13,279,892 


$1,518,104 $60,310 $4,911 



Town of Epping 






2006 Annual Report 


Summary of Valuation MS-1 


Value of Land 


Acres 


2005 


2006 Net Change 



Current Use 

Residential 

Commercial/Industrial 

Total Taxable Land 

Tax Exempt/Non-Taxable 



8,844 


$1,101,400 


$1,131,200 


$29,800 


4,670 


193,641,900 


199,875,300 


6,233,400 


977 


55,512,600 


50,804,300 


(4,708,300) 


14,491 


250,255,900 


251,810,800 


1,554,900 


931 


14,146,900 


14,821,200 


674,300 



Value of Buildings 


Public Utilities 


7,053,600 


6,967,000 


(86,600) 


1 Valuation before Exemption 


$599,630,600 


$626,341,700 


$26,711,100 


Blind Exemption 


4@1 5,000 60,000 


60,000 


- 


Elderly Exemption 


1,280,000 


3,045,400 


1,765,400 


Total Amount of Exemptions 


$1,340,000 


$3,105,400 


$1,765/400 


Net Value for Local Tax Rate 


$598,290,600 


$623,236,300 


$24,945,700 



Net Value w/o Utilities for State Education Tax 



$591,237,000 $616,269,300 



$25,032,300 



Statement of Appropriations MS-2 

Item 



General Government 



Executive 

Election, Reg & Vital Statistics 

Financial Administration 

Revaluation of Property 

Legal Expense 

Personnel Administration 

Planning & Zoning 

General Government Buildings 

Cemeteries 

Insurance 

Advertising & Regional Assoc. 



2005 



2006 



Difference 



$176,311 


$182,221 


$5,910 


67,145 


76,152 


9,007 


144,179 


149,375 


5,196 


71,500 


43,000 


(28,500) 


30,500 


45,000 


14,500 


44,100 


250 


(43,850) 


85,237 


97,230 


11,993 


119,106 


111,160 


(7,946) 


20,000 


6,000 


(14,000) 


45,000 


46,000 


1,000 



Other General Government 


- 


33,489 


33,489 


Public Safety 


Police 


988,654 


1,075,459 


86,805 


Ambulance 


293,758 


256,678 


(37,080) 


Fire 


151,914 


157,997 


6,083 


Building Inspection 


105,416 


112,811 


7,395 


Emergency Management 


- 


- 


- 


Other (including Communications) 


31,229 


- 


- 


Airport/Aviation Center 


Airport Operations 

n 








El 









2006 Annual Report 






Town of Epping 


Item 


2005 


2006 


Difference 


Highway & Streets 



Administration 
Highway& Streets 
Bridges 
Street Lighting 
Other 



Sanitation 



Administration 

Solid Waste Collection 

Solid Waste Disposal 

Solid Waste Clean-Up 

Sewage Coll. & Disposal & Other 



Water Distribution & Treatment 



Administration 
Water Services 
Water Treatment, Conservation & Other 



476,521 
20,000 



550,719 



20,000 



74,198 



56,718 


102,290 


45,572 


144,500 


224,400 


79,900 


30,750 


- 


(30,750) 



Electrical Operations 

Administration 

Pest Control (Animal Control Officer) 

Health Agencies & Hosp. & Other 



2,980 
35,130 



2,980 
35,130 



Administration Direct Assistance 
Intergovernmental Welfare Payments 
Vendor Payments & Other 



Culture & Recreation 



Parks & Recreation 

Library 

Patriotic Purposes 

Other Culture & Recreation 



Conservation 



Admin. & Purch. of Nat. Resources 
Other Conservation 
Redevelopment & Housing 
Economic Development 



Debt Service 



Prinicipal: Long Term Bonds & Notes 
Interest: Long Term Bonds & Notes 
Interest on Tax Anticipation Notes 
Other Debt Service 



10,530 



11,530 



1,000 



180,341 


178,886 


(1,455) 


114,241 


127,638 


13,397 


1,500 


1,500 


- 



2,000 

15,000 

160,602 
78,608 



2,000 

50,000 

161,742 
71,892 



35,000 

1,140 
(6,716) 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Statement of Appropriations MS-2 (continued) 



Item 



Capital Outlay 



Land 

Machinery, Vehicles & Equipment 

Buildings 

Improvements Other than Buildings 



Operating Transfers Out 



To Special Revenue Fund 
To Capital Projects Fund 
To Enterprise Fund 

Sewer 

Water 

Electric 

Airport 
To Capital Reserve Fund 

To Expendable Trust Fund (except Health Maint. Fund) 
To Health Maintenance Fund 
To Non-ExpendableTrust Fund 
To Agency Funds 



Total Appropriation 



2005 



49,500 



2006 



39,000 



Difference 



(49,500) 



39,000 



703,393 


736,038 


32,645 


312,387 


322,800 


10,413 


- 


- 


- 


25,000 


- 


(25,000) 


24,642 


39,343 


14,701 



$4,818,392 $5,070,710 



$252,318 



Revised Estimated Revenues MS-4 



Source of Revenue 



FY05 Projected FY06 Projected Dollar Variance 



Land Use Change Taxes 

Resident Tax 

Timber Tax 

Payment in Lieu of Taxes 

Other Taxes 

Interest & Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 

Inventory Taxes 

Excavation Tax ($0.02 per cu yd) 



Licenses, Permits, & Fees 



Business Licenses & Permits 
Motor Vehicles Permit Fees 
Building Permits 
Other Licenses, Permits, & Fees 
From Federal Government 



00,000 


$330,000 


$130,000 


2,400 


2,200 


(200) 


- 


- 


- 


56,000 


86,550 


30,550 



32,600 


36,800 


4,200 


940,000 


950,000 


10,000 


130,000 


59,500 


(70,500) 


8,550 


6,650 


(1,900) 


20,000 


25,000 


5.000 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Revised Estimated Revenues MS-4 (continued) 



Source of Revenue 


FY05 Projected 


FY06 Projected 


Dollar Variance 


State Government 


Shared Revenue 


35,758 


35,758 


- 


Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution 


213,381 


231,445 


18,064 


Highway Block Grant 


125,000 


131,372 


6,372 


Water Pollution Grant 


195,351 


187,388 


(7,963) 


Housing & Community Development 


- 


- 


- 


State & Federal Forest Land Reimbursement 


- 


- 


- 


Flood Control Reimbursement 


- 


- 


- 


Other 


41,439 


21,000 


(20,439) 


From Other Governments 


- 


- 


- 


Charges for Services 


Income from Departments 


230,000 


267,100 


37,100 


Other Charges 


- 


- 


- 


Miscellaneous Revenues 


Sale of Municipal Property 


120,000 


40,000 


(80,000) 


Interest on Investments 


25,000 


60,000 


35,000 


Other 


35,500 


10,300 


(25,200) 


Interfund Transfer In 


From Special Revenue Fund 


169,500 


159,000 


(10,500) 


From Capital Projects Funds 


- 


- 


- 


From Enterprise Fund 


- 


- 


- 


Sewer (Offset) 


508,042 


548,650 


40,608 


Water (Offset) 


312,387 


322,800 


10,413 


Electric (Offset) 


- 


- 


- 


Airport (Offset) 


- 


- 


- 


From Capital Reserve Funds 


49,500 


- 


(49,500) 


From Trust & Agency Funds 


14,000 


- 


(14,000) 


From Conservation Funds 


- 


- 


- 


Other Financing Sources 


Proceeds from Long Term Notes & Bonds 


- 


- 


- 


Subtotal of Revenues 


$3/464/408 


$3,511,513 


$47,105 


Less Voted From "Surplus" 


24,642 


39,343 


14,701 


Unreserved Fund Balance- Reduce Taxes 


- 


698,051 


698,051 


Total Revenue & Credits 


$3/489,050 


$4,248,907 


$759,857 



Requested Overlay 



150,000 



150,000 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Report of the Trust Funds MS-9 









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Town of Epping 



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Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Salaries of Town Employees 



Employee 


Department 


Status 


2006 
Salary 


2006Actually 1 
Earned* 


Bielecki, Judith 


Admin Assit. 


FT 


$32,978 


$35,364.11 


Blanchard, Joyce 


Deputy Clerk 


FT 


33,488 


33,463.20 


Bonenfant, Carol 


Police 


FT 


30,160 


19,170.54 


Clark, Gregory 


Highway 


FT 


24,648 


28,580.91 


Clivio, Thomas 


Police 


FT 


32,074 


39,533.35 


Cote, Richard 


Police 


FT 


40,581 


55,630.29 


Dionne, Norman 


Water 


FT 


48,610 


65,377.54 


Dodge, Gregory 


Police 


FT 


69,680 


69,996.20 


Fluet, Raymond 


Police 


FT 


39,395 


49,393.06 


Foley, Linda 


Tax Clerk 


FT 


47,694 


48,301.83 


Fournier, Steve 


Town Admin 


FT 


57,637 


56,988.52 


Gallagher, Sean 


Police 


FT 


48,734 


66,001.98 


Hickey, Seth 


Recreation 


FT 


41,600 


41,931.84 


Jardis, Bradley 


Police 


FT 


38,230 


41,706.86 


Kelley, Kevin 


Building Insp. 


FT 


49,088 


54,677.31 


Kilham, Robert 


Water 


FT 


45,094 


50,525.06 


Kimball, Jodie 


Police 


FT 


30,784 


12,463.90 


Loader, David 


Police 


FT 


33,675 


39,561.24 


McDonough, Phyllis 


Planning 


FT 


37,003 


38,039.65 


McFadden, Richard 


Police 


FT 


41,787 


51,715.17 


Newman, Jason 


Police 


FT 


49,608 


57,164.08 


Nye, Gregory 


Police 


FT 


41,787 


50,962.52 


Reinhold, David 


Highway 


FT 


47,008 


54,933.46 


Reynolds-Cooper, A. 


Library 


FT 


41,205 


41,481.94 


Souther, Mary 


Build Sec. 


FT 


24,960 


12,222.00 


Talbot, Lisa 


Bookkeeper 


FT 


37,274 


37,035.84 


Tondreault, Seth 


Police 


FT 


31,450 


13,596.66 


Turner, Marc 


Police 


FT 


47,029 


55,440.30 


Victoria, John 


Highway 


FT 


31,138 


34,798.45 


Wallace, Mike 


Police 


FT 


54,350 


60,284.17 


Zukas, Kevin 


Ambul 


FT 


46,964 


47,592.62 


Total Full Time Employ 


ees 




$1,275,713 


$1,363,934.60 



Employee 


Department 


Status 


2006 
Salary 


2006 Actually I 
Earned* 


Bennis, Daniel 


ETV 


PT 


$1,298 


$2,203.52 


Channell, William 


ETV 


PT 


7,488 


8,577.00 


Denoncour, Joseph 


ETV 


PT 


1,460 


1,983.03 


Frederick, Glenn 


ETV 


PT 


1,404 


1,24238 


Frederick, Jaymie 


ETV 


PT 


1,092 


41125 


Frederick, Josh 


ETV 


PT 


1,298 


929.76 


Johnson, Stephen 


ETV 


PT 


1,298 


1,00336 


Richard, Roxanne 


ETV 


PT 


1,298 


1,37632 


Andrews, Nancy 


Library 


PT 


2,340 


3,147.75 


Berube, David 


Library 


PT 


2,475 


2,900.05 


Murphy, Simonne 


Library 


PT 


4,422 


3,720.83 


Semprini, Dorothy 


Library 


PT 


2,678 


2,655.50 


Wilkinsjracie 


Library 


PT 


19,501 


15,673.66 


Hanley, Paul 


Police 


PT 


6,656 


2,998.00 


Hansen, Willaim 


Animal 


PT 


2,080 


1,845.00 


Kelley, Kevin 


Police 


PT 


6,656 


8,046.00 


Laurent, Beverly 


Police 


PT 


2,210 


2,737.00 


Leduc, Jeffrey 


Police 


PT 


6,656 


2,250.75 


Lussier, Shannon 


Police 


PT 


6,656 


6,779.50 


Newell, Healther 


Prosecutor 


PT 


31,200 


24,490.00 


Newman, Richard 


Police 


PT 


6,968 


5,627.70 


Brackett, Deborah 


Solid Waste 


PT 


10,920 


12,163.50 


Brown, Stuart 


Solid Waste 


PT 


11,700 


9,91125 


Eaton, Mayhew 


Solid Waste 


PT 


7,020 


7,668.00 


Fontaine, Jon 


Solid Waste 


PT 


11,700 


3,537.00 


Koch, Dennis 


Water/Sewer 


PT 


17,784 


16,923.50 


Total Part Time Emplo) 


»ees 




$176,258.00 


$150,801.61 



*This includes any overtime pay earned or details worked. 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



2006 Tax Rate Calculation 



Town Portion 


Gross Appropriations 


$5,070,71 1 
3,550,856 






Minus Revenues 






Minus Shared Revenues 


(25,992) 






Add Overlay 


150,559 






Add War Service Credits 


31,000 






Approved Town Tax Effort 


1,675,422 


Town Tax Rate 
$2.69 











School Portion 


Net Local School Budget (Gross Appropriation - Revenues) 


$12,347,895 






Minus Equitable Education Grant 


(2,953,684) 






State Education Taxes 


(1,440,262) 






Approved School Tax Effort 


7,953,949 


Local School Rate 
$12.76 










State Education Taxes 


Equalized Valuation (w/o utilities) x 


2.52 






$469,944,277 




$1,440,262.00 




Divide by Local Assessed Value (w/o utilities) 








$589,712,700 








Excess State Education Taxes to be Remitted to the State 









Pay to State 


State School Rate 
$2.34 











County Portion 


Due to County 


$542,799 






Minus Shared Revenues 


(5,378) 






Approved County Tax Effort 


537,421 


County Tax Rate 
$0.86 











Total Property Taxes Assessed 


$11,607,054 






Minus War Service Credits 


(31,000) 






Total Property Taxes Commitment 


$11,576,054 


Total Rate 
$18.65 










Proof Of Rate 


Net Assessed Valuation 


TaxRate 


Assessment 


State Education Tax (w/o utilities) 


$616,269,300 


$2.34 


$1,440,262.00 


All Other Taxes 


623,236,300 


16.31 


10,166,792.00 








$11,607,054.00 



Town of Epping 2006 Annual Report 

Auditor's Report 




Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 
193 North Main Street * Concord • New Hampshire • 03301-5063 • 603-225-6996 • FAX -224-1380 

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S COMMUNICATION OF 
REPORTABLE CONDITIONS AND OTHER MATTERS 

To the Members of the Board of Selectmen 
Town of Epping 
Epping, New Hampshire 

In planning and performing our audit of the Town of Epping for the year ended December 3 1 , 2005, we considered the 
Town' s internal control structure in order to determine the scope of our auditing procedures for the purpose of expressing 
our opinions on the financial statements. Our review of these systems was not intended to provide assurance on the 
internal control structure and should not be relied on for that purpose. 

Under the standards established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, reportable conditions involve 
matters coming to our attention relating to significant deficiencies in the design or operation of the internal control 
structure that, in our judgment, could adversely affect the Town's ability to record, process, summarize, and report 
financial data consistent with the assertions of management in the financial statements. A material weakness is a 
reportable condition in which the design or operation of one or more of the internal control structure elements does not 
reduce to a relatively low level the risk that misstatements caused by error or fraud, in amounts that would be material 
in relation to the financial statements being audited, may occur and not be detected within a timely period by employees 
in the normal course of performing their assigned functions. Our consideration of the internal control structure would 
not necessarily disclose all matters in the internal control structure that might constitute reportable conditions and, 
accordingly, would not necessarily disclose all reportable conditions that are also considered to be material weaknesses 
as defined above. 

UPDATE OF PRIOR YEAR FINDINGS 

General Books of Account 

We continue to note improvement in the year-end financial reports presented for audit. In particular, this year, the 
enterprise funds (water department and sewer department) were much improved over past presentations. Fixed asset 
recordkeeping was properly recorded in the financial statements and the elimination of water and sewer capital reserve 
funds in the custody of the trustees of trust funds will reduce confusion in the future. 

Ambulance Billings 

We repeat our previous suggestion that the board of selectmen approve written procedures to be performed monthly in 
order to assure that reports received from the service organization are reconciled and documentation is retained and 
presented for the audit. Procedures should also address write off of uncollectible amounts. 

Purchase Order System 

Our random testing of expenditures covering all funds, did not disclose any issues of noncompliance with regard to the 
use of purchase orders. 

We understand that the Town Administrator is in the process of reviewing the present purchase order policy in order 
to address potential noncompliance issues caused primarily by emergency purchases. 



2006 Annual Report Town of Epping 



Town of Epping 

Independent Auditor's Communication of Reportable Conditions and Other Matters 



Treasurer's Monthly Report 

We have met with the new treasurer to review his duties and responsibilities in connection with recordkeeping, monthly 
bank reconciliations and reporting. We have stressed the need to have accurate and timely monthly reports submitted 
to the accounting office. The separation of duties and monthly reconciliations by both the Town accountant and treasurer 
are an integral part of the internal accounting controls utilized by the Town to provide assurance that interim financial 
reports are accurate. 

We have suggested to responsible individuals that a monitoring be performed within the next two or three months to 
assure that these internal controls are working effectively, and also to provide technical assistance as required. 

Applicable Reporting Standard 

During June of 1 999, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issued Statement No. 34, Basic Financial 
Statements - and Management 's Discussion and Analysis -for State and Local Governments. This statement drastically 
changes the way in which financial statements are prepared and requires additional information to be reported in order 
for the financial statements to be in compliance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of 
America. Statement No. 34 took effect for the Town of Epping for the fiscal year ended December 3 1 , 2004. 

The Town has not implemented GASB Statement No . 34, but has presented the financial statements following the format 
that was in effect prior to GASB Statement No. 34. While we have conducted our audit following generally accepted 
auditing standards as we have in past years, we have issued an adverse opinion again this year because the financial 
statements are not presented following the model established by Statement No. 34. As described more fully in our audit 
opinion, the financial statements are missing several required statements and supplementary information, and the format 
presented does not follow Statement No. 34. The opinion does not mean to imply that the figures presented are incorrect, 
but that they are not presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. 

We recommend that the Town of Epping take action to implement GASB Statement No. 34 as required by accounting 
principles generally accepted in the United States of America. 

This report is intended solely for the information and use of management, the board of selectmen, and others within the 
administration. This restriction is not intended to limit distribution of this report, which is a matter of public record. 



February 15,2006 






Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



General Information 



Elected Officials 

Selectmen 

Tom Gauthier, Chair, 2007 
Susan McGeough, 2008 
Kim Sullivan, 2007 
Jerry Langdon, 2009 
Jeffrey Harris, 2009 

Town Clerk 

Linda Foley, 2007 
Deputy: Joyce Blanchard 

Tax Collector 

Linda Foley, 2007 
Deputy: Joyce Blanchard 

Treasurer 

Jim McGeough, 2008 
Joseph Foley, Deputy 

Fire Wards 

Charles Goodspeed, 2009 

Richard Cantrall, 2005 

Donald Oakes, 2007 

Tom Gauthier, Selectmen's Representative 

Cemetery Trustees 

Daniel Harvey, 2009 
Paul Ladd, 2007 

Moderator 

Robert Goodrich, 2008 

Planning Board 

Robert Graham, 2009, Chair 
Corey McPhee, 2007 
Mike Morosco, 2009 
Gregory Tillman, 2008 
Susan McGeough, Selectmen's 

Representative 
Kim Sullivan, Selectmen's Alternate 
Stephen Colby, Appointed Alternate, 2007 



Library Trustees 

Sylvia Nollett, 2009 
Patricia Van Wagoner, 2007 
Cheryl Denoncour, 2008 
Tracy Dwyer, 2007 
Teresa Kucera, 2009 

Budget Committee 

James McGeough, 2008, Chair 
Brenda McCartney, 2008 
Elizabeth Conrad, 2008 
Amy Randall, 2009 
Michael King, 2009 
Marc Nickerson, 2007 
Paul Spidle, 2007 
Michelle Cromarty, 2007 
Laurilee Shennett, 2009, 

resigned 10-19-2006 
Jeffrey Harris, Selectmen's Representative 
Jeff LeDuc, School Board Representative 

Trustees of Trust Fund 

Joe Denoncour, 2007, Chair 
Mark Kucera, 2008 
Daniel Harvey, 2009 

Supervisors of Checklist 

Grace Lavoie, 2010 
Pamela Holmes, 2012 
Kim Gauthier, 2008 

Water and Sewer Commission 

Joseph Foley, 2009, Chair 

Michael King, 2007 

Henry DeBoer, 2008 

Dennis Koch, Appointed Administrator 

Jerry Langdon, Selectmen's Representative 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Paul Langdon, Chair, 2007 
Tom Dwyer, Jr., 2007 
Dave Mylott, 2008 
Bob Jordan, 2009 
Paul Spidle, 2009 



Appointed Officials 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Administrator, Stephen Fournier 

(no term) 
Assessing Clerk, Administrative Assistant: 

Judith Bielecki (no term) 
Assistant: Joyce Blanchard (no term) 
Bookkeeper: Lisa Talbot (no term) 
Planning Board Secretary: Phyllis 

McDonough (no term) 
Code Enforcement Officer: Kevin Kelley, 

resigned 9/29/2006 
Emergency Management: Brian Toomire 

(no term) 

Welfare Administrator 

Phyllis McDonough (no term) 

Fire Department 

Chief of Department: Brian Toomire 
(no term) 

Police Department 

Chief of Police: Gregory C. Dodge 

(no term) 
Secretary: Carol Ann Bonefant (no term) 
Lieutenant: Michael Wallace (no term) 
Corporal: Jason Newman (no term) 
Sergeant: Sean Gallagher (no term) 
Detective: Marc Turner (no term), 

Richard Cote (no term) 
Patrol Officers: Ray Fluet, Thomas Clivio, 

Richard McFadden, Bradley Jardis, 

Gregory Nye, David Loader, Seth 

Tondreault (no term) 
Part-Time Officers: Sgt. Richard Newman, 

Sr., Paul Hanley, Jeffrey Leduc, Kevin 

Kelley 
Animal Control Officer: William Hansen 

Library Director 

Amanda Cooper 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Recreation Director 

Seth Hickey (no term) 

Recreation Advisory Commission 

Heather Toland, 2007 

Kelli Killen, 2008 

Brian Reed, 2009 

John DiFrancesco, 2009 

Jeffrey Harris, Selectmen's Representative 

Ballot Clerks 

Patricia Sutliffe, 2008 
Barbara MacDonald, 2008 
Anne Marie Gomez-Amaru, 2008 
Andrew Vallone, 2008 

Conservation Commission 

Scon Pim, 2008 
Sonja Gonzalez, 2007 
Jeff Conrad, 2008 
Gregory Tillman, Chair, 2007 
John Bennett, 2009 
Amos Clapp, 2009 
Jerry Langdon, Forestry Committee 
' Robert Kimball, Forestry Committee 
Kevin Martin, Forestry Committee 
Jerry Langdon, Selectmen's Representative 
Isobel Parke, Honorable Member 

Crossing Guard 

Beverly Laurent 

Lamprey River Advisory Committee 

Tillman, Gregory 

Historic District Commission 

Madelyn Williamson, Chair, 2008 
Joy True, 2007 
Julie McPhee, 2007 
Nancy Grimard, 2008 
Pam Currier, 2008 
Forrest True, 2008 
Susan McGeough, Selectman's 
Representative 



School District Officers 

School Board 

Pamela Tibbetts, 2009 
Scott Booth, 2007 
Susan Kimball, Chair, 2007 
Robert Lonek, 2008 
Jeffrey LeDuc, 2008 

Superintendent of Schools 

Barbara Munsey 

Business Administrator 

Martha Williamson 

Special Education Director 

Catherine Zylinski 

Assistant Superintendant for 
Curriculum and Transportation 

Gary Tyrone 

Administrators 

Grades 1-5 

Mark Vallone, Principal 

Grades 6-8 

Lynn Ward Healy, Principal 

Grades 9-12 

Dixie Bacallao Tremblay, Principal 

Treasurer 

Rene Pettis, 2008, resigned 6/30/2006 
Joseph Foley, appointed 7/1/2006 

Clerk 

Robin O'Day, 2008 

Moderator 

Robert Goodrich, 2008 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Area Statistical Information 



CID Number 810 

County Rockingham 

Labor Market Area Portsmouth-Manchester 

Distance to: 

Manchester, NH 23 miles 

Boston, MA 54 miles 

Portland, ME 74 miles 

New York, NY 257 miles 

Montreal, Canada 278 miles 

Elevation 160 

Temperature (°F) 

Annual Average 46.6 

January Average 22.2 

Precipitation: Annual Average 44.0 



Demographics 



Total Population Community County 

2005 6,087 295,076 

2000 5,549 278,748 

1990 5,267 246,744 

1980 3,460 190,345 

1970 2,356 138,951 

Population by Age (2000) 

under 5 383 

5 to 19 1,219 

20 to 34 1 ,030 

35 to 54 1 ,92 1 

55 to 64 41 7 

65+ 506 

Median Age 35.8 years 

Min. travel time to work (mins) 27.7 

Residents working in community 16% 

Residents commuting to another NH community 69% 

Residents communting out-of-state 15% 

Wal-Mart 350 

Epping High School 91 

Epping Elementary School 87 

McDonalds 50 

ERRCO (Recycling) 47 

Abenaki Timber 30 

Burger King 25 

PSNH (Utility) 15 

Goodrich Brickyard 12 



Municipal Services 



Town Hall Hours M-Th 8-4; F 8-12 noon 

Type of Government Selectman/SB2 

Budget (Annual 2004) $3,763,1 07 

Planning Board Elected 

Industrial Plans Reviewed by Planning Board 

Zoning 1968/00 

Master Plan 1999 

Capital Improvement Plan Yes 

Full Time Police Dept Yes 

Full Time Fire Dept Yes 

Town Fire Insurance Rating 5/9 



Taxes (2005) 



Local Property Tax Rate (per thousand) $16.92 

Equalization Ratio 93.6 

Full Value Tax Rate (per thousand) $1 5.89 

2005 Valuation 

Residential 81.4% 

Commerial 17.3% 

Other 1.4% 



Housing (2005) 



Single-Family Units 1636 

Number of building permits 50 

Multi-Family Units 416 

Number of building Permits 5 

Mobile Homes 447 



Utilities 



Electricity PSNH/NH Electric Coop. 

Natural Gas None 

Water Epping Water Dept. 

Source 2 Bed Rock Wells 

Average Usage Hoar Well 90 gpm 

Average Usage Well #4 70 gpm 

Sanitation 

Sewer Municpal 

Coverage 25% 

Municipal Treatment Plant 

Type Active Sludge/Zenon Microfiltration 

Capacity (million gal/day) 0.50 

Load (percent of capacity) 20% 

Telephone Verizon 

Cellular Phone Access Yes 

Cable Television Access Yes 

High-Speed Internet Service (Bus. & Res.) Yes 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Transportation/access 



Town Directory 



Road Access 

State Routes 27, 101, 125 

Nearest Interstate 1 -95, Exit 2 

Distance 1 5 miles 

Railroad Downeaster (Exeter) 

Airport Manchester 

Runway 9250 feet 

Lighted Yes 

Navigational Aids Yes 

Distance 27 miles 

Hospital Exeter Hospital 

Distance 1 Miles 

Beds 2 1 8 

Number of Doctors working in town 1 



Educational/Childcare Facilities 





#of 






Vocation/ 




Schools 


Grades 


Enroll. 


Education 


Elementary 


1 


K-5 


459 




Middle/Jr. High 


1 


6-8 


270 




High School 


1 


9-12 


413 


No 



Higher Education Institutions 

Technical College Stratham Comm.Tech. College 

College/University Chester College of NE/Mclntosh/UNH 

Daycare Facilities 9 

Total Capacity 245 



Community Services & Recreation 



Protestant Churches 4 

Catholic Churches 

Hotels/Motels 

Bed & Brea kfasts 4 

Live Theater 2 

Museums 

Local Television 

Channel 22, Epping TV & Bulletin Board 



Library 

Harvey-Mitchell Memorial 

Municipal Parks 

Conservation Areas 3 

Tennis Courts 

Nearest Ski Areas Mclntyre 

Other Recreation 2 Race Tracks 



Emergency Numbers 

Fire/Police/Rescue 911 

General Business 

Fire 679-5446 

Police 679-5122 

Animal Control 679-5122 

Schools 

Elementary 679-8018 

High School 679-5472 

Superintendent's Office 679-8003 

Town Offices 

Code Enforcement and Health 679-1224 

Highway 679-5441 

Library 679-5944 

Planning and Zoning, Welfare 679-1 202 

Recreation 679-3301 

Tax Assessing 679-5441 

Town Administrator 679-5441 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector 679-8288 

(voter/car registrations, dog licenses, 

taxes, water/sewer payments) 
Water and Sewer 679-5 1 7 1 

Other Resources 

Department of Motor Vehicles 679-21 1 1 

Epping Post Office 679-5952 

Rockingham County Sheriff 679-2225 

Exeter Chamber of Commerce 772-241 1 

Raymond Chamber of Commerce 895-2254 

Rockingham Planning Commission 778-0885 

For more information, contact: 

Town Administrator 

157 Main Street, Epping, NH 03042 

Telephone: 603-679-5441 

Fax: 603-679-3002 

Email: administrator@townofepping.com 

Web: www.ci.epping.nh.us 



Town of Epping 2006 Annual Report 

Town Owned Properties 

Location Value 

High Road — 22 Acres with a Conservation Easement 52,901.00 

Off Camp Lee Road — 4.5 Acres 28,500.00 



Map 


Lot 


Serial 


10 


032 


619 


12 


026 


539 


15 


013 


2241 


18 


001 


2126 


22 


044 


1744 



Red Oak Hill — 40,000 S.f., Triangle at intersection of Red Oak Hill, 
Plumer Road and Nottingham Sq. Rd. 



Hoar Pond Property — Taken by Eminent Domain for New Well 9/99; 
56 +/- Beniah Lane 



24 


097 


2891 


25 


002 


607 


26 


001 


1780 


26 


014 


2578 


26 


015 


2576 


26 


016 


2575 


26 


017 


2574 


26 


018 


2573 


26 


019 


2572 


26 


020 


2571 


26 


021 


2570 


26 


022 


2569 


26 


023 


2568 


26 


024 


2567 


26 


025 


2563 


26 


026 


2565 



25,000.00 



Jacobswell Road — 11.65 Acres, Conservation Land 49,700.00 

37,900.00 



17 Academy Street — School Property — Watson Academy, Middle/High 
School, Elementary School 



22 


068 


2503 


Plumer Road — 17,000 S.f., Old Cemetery on Lehrmit Property 


3,900.00 


22 


089 


1837 


Cate Street — 3.18 Acres, Public Skating Rink and Sports Field 


45,000.00 


22 


096 


2881 


Cate Street — Sports Field and Tennis Courts 


35,700.00 


24 


001 


603 


130 Old Hedding Rd. — 13.18 Acres 


N/A 



24 009 1716 Route 87— 11. 2 Acres N/A 

... ._, , nr Old Hedding Rd — Dump — 11 Acres, Transfer Staion, Recycling and n -,* nnnn 

24 096 605 ,,.-,_, 97,600.00 

Highway Storage Ld 

Dorothy Drive — Backland — 6 Acres 30,1 00.00 

Jacobswell Road — Forest — 2.37 Acres, Protected Conservation Forest Land 26,700.00 

Prescott Road — 2 Acres 26, 1 00.00 

Joshua Lane — 3.21 Acres 27,300.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.47 Acres 25,500.00 

Joshua Lane — 2.02 Acres 26,1 00.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.24 Acres 25,300.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.71 Acres 25,800.00 

Joshua Lane — 1 .1 2 Acres 25,200.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.77 Acres 25,900.00 

Joshua Lane — 1 .59 Acres 25,700.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.68 Acres 25,800.00 

Quakerfield Drive — 1.46 Acres 25,500.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.52 Acres 25,600.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.10 Acres 25,200.00 

Joshua Lane — 1.37 Acres 25,500.00 



2006 Annual Report 






Town of Epping 


Map Lot 


Serial 


Location 


Value 


26 027 


2566 


Quakerfield Drive — 1.643 Acres 


25,700.00 


26 028 


2564 


Quakerfield Drive — 1.3 Acres 


25,400.00 



Map 


Lot 


Serial 


26 


027 


2566 


26 


028 


2564 


27 


020 


606 


27 


020-a 


2107 


27 


061 


602 


27 


095 


2292 


27 


158 


80 


27 


190 


2108 


28 


045 


944 


29 


103 


2932 


29 


104 


2767 


29 


113 


1239 



29 



29 



29 



124 



162 



285 



601 



29 


133 


604 


29 


134 


595 


29 


135 


592 


29 


161 


2331 



2133 



29 


167 


599 


29 


177 


608 


29 


283-e 


2909 


29 


283-008 


3094 



2130 



29 


312 


1915 


30 


031 


2135 


30 


056 


2263 


31 


008 


2741 


31 


026 


2832 


32 


011 


1071 


32 


025 


1933 



Mill Rd — 5.5 Acres, New Cemetery Land 

Mill Rd — 4.5 Acres, Connected to Lot #106, Cemetery Land 

Holt Rd. — 6 Acres, West Epping Fire Station 

Folsom Lane — 10.5 Acres, Mary Folsom Blair Memorial Park 

11 School Street — .31 Acres & Building 

Depot Road — 3.36 Acres 

Ledgewood Lane — 23.85 Acres for Conservation 

Pleasant Street from Ed White — 4.4 Acres, Backland 

Pleasant Street — 17,200 S.f., Water Tower Land, .39 Acres 

37 Pleasant Street — Safety Complex 

Pleasant Street — 12 Acres known as Scoutfield, owned by town, 
custody of School Officials 

Main Street — 1.77 Acres, Town Hall and Parking Lot 

Main Street — 9,000 S.f., Harvey Mitchell Memorial Library 

Main Street — 7,200 S.f., Main St. Fire Station 

Mill Street — 30,000 S.f., Waste Water Treatment Facility Lift Station 

Water Street — 8,778 S.f., Miriam Jackson Memorial Park under custody 
of Conservation Comm. 

Water Street — 5,226 S.f., Dar Memorial Lot 

Bunker Ave. — 900 S.f., Parking Lot 

Calef Highway. — Whelabrator Easement to town for Sewer Lift Station 

Calef Highway — .057 Acres+d12 

Main Street — 12,740 S.f., Triangle above Cumberland Farms maintained 
by Epping Garden Club 

Bunker Ave. — 1,465 S.f., Three Lot Parking Lot 

Lagoon Road — 58 Acres, Municipal Sewage Treatment Facility 

Route 27 — 9.98 Acres 

Off Mast Road — 11.2 Acres 

Mast Road — 46.66 Acres 

Mast Road — 4.4 Acres 

Birch Road — 18 Acres 



54,800.00 

4,100.00 

102,600.00 

37,100.00 

N/A 

N/A 

1,262.00 

4,400.00 

240,800.00 

116,000.00 

7,200.00 

584,900.00 

143,400.00 

111,200.00 

18,000.00 

25,000.00 

27,800.00 

17,200.00 

2,600.00 

N/A 

114,200.00 

15,100.00 
1,509,900.00 
N/A 
1,434.00 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Town Owned Properties (continued) 



Location 

Route 101 West 
Route 101 — 1.49 Acres 
Off Route 101 — 1.38 Acres 
Off Route 101 — 2.16 Acres 
Witham Road 
Tami Lane — .96 Acres 
Fremont Road — .17 Acre: 
Fremont Road — .52 Acre 
Off Exeter Road — 25 Acn 
Off Birch Road — 2.2 Acre 
Birch Road — 4.5 Acres 
10 Birch Road — 20 Acres 



34 


010 


494 


Witham Road 


N/A 


34 


015 


1900 


Tami Lane — .96 Acres 


N/A 


35 


006 


1361 


Fremont Road — .17 Acres 


N/A 


36 


020 


2829 


Fremont Road — .52 Acres & Bldg. 


N/A 


37 


007 


1674 


Off Exeter Road — 25 Acres 


N/A 


39 


004 


2827 


Off Birch Road — 2.2 Acres 


N/A 


39 


010 


2127 


Birch Road — 4.5 Acres 


N/A 



Value 

N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



Marriages 



January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006 



Date of 
Marriage 


Name of 
Groom & Bride 


Residence of 
Groom & Bride 


Date of 
Marriage 


Name of 
Groom & Bride 


Residence of 
Groom & Bride 


1/15/2006 


Donald Evans 
Donna Todd 


Epping 
Epping 


5/6/2006 


Joseph Chase 
Clara Coussement 


Epping 
Epping 


1/18/2006 


John Bourdelais 
Rita Hairington 


Epping 
Epping 


5/12/2006 


Jeffrey Schultz 
Jennifer Williamson 


Epping 
Epping 


2/26/2006 


Miguel Bolorin 
Stephanie Campbell 


Dover 
Epping 


5/28/2006 


Shuan Schultz 
Kelley Cole 


Epping 
Exeter 


3/9/2006 


Paul Lusk 
Linda Fiances 


Epping 
Rochester 


6/6/2006 


Stephen McMullin 
Stephanie Foti 


Epping 
Derry 


3/10/2006 


James Malcuit 
Patticia Lazazzera 


Epping 
Epping 


6/11/2006 


Gary Sudak 
Jennifer Gannett 


Epping 
Epping 


4/22/2006 


Kevin Field 
Kim McGown 


Epping 
Epping 


6/11/2006 


Marcus Dube 
Stacey Phillips 


Epping 
Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Date of 
Marriage 



Name of 
Groom & Bride 



Residence of 
Groom & Bride 



Date of 
Marriage 



Name of 
Groom & Bride 



Residence of 
Groom & Bride 



6/24/2006 


Daniel Hynds 
Crystal Bailey 


Epping 
Epping 


6/24/2006 


John Cooper 
Tammy Yawnitz 


Newburyport, MA 
Epping 


6/25/2006 


John McAuliffe 
Stacie Sarno 


Epping 
Epping 


7/8/2006 


Carl Campbell 
Judith MacDonald 


Epping 
Epping 


8/25/2006 


Michael Donnell 
Nicole Brooks 


Epping 
Epping 


8/26/2006 


Steven Gaffney 
Heidi Gregson 


Epping 
Epping 


8/26/2006 


Scott Kukesh 
Nicole Marston 


Epping 
Epping 


8/27/2006 


James Josselyn 
Deanna Hale 


Epping 
Epping 


9/3/2006 


John Burke 
Jennifer Lewis 


Newmarket 
Epping 


9/8/2006 


Dean Wishart 
Romaine Catusi 


Epping 
Epping 


9/9/2006 


Seth Denoncour 
Tara Paquette 


Epping 
Sullivan 


9/10/2006 


Thomas Arneil 
Carol Rollins 


Epping 
Epping 


9/16/2006 


Richard Rogers 
Alicia Smith 


Epping 
Epping 


9/16/2006 


Timothy Houle 
Jessica Achilles 


Epping 
Epping 


9/23/2006 


James Lawrence 
Jennifer Dudley 


Epping 
Epping 


10/7/2006 


Ricky Silver 
Barbara Tagget 


Epping 
Epping 



10/8/2006 


Jeremy Bonner 
Amy Nardella 


Epping 
Epping 


10/14/2006 


Rory Blais 
Nicole Richard 


Epping 
Epping 


10/15/2006 


Chad Sullivan 
Shanna Titcomb 


Epping 
Epping 


10/21/2006 


Jeremy Iverson 
Randi DeRoy 


Epping 
Epping 


10/25/2006 


George Stelmach 
Alana Davidson 


Epping 
Epping 


11/10/2006 


Eric Reddin 
Dawn Gagnon 


Somerville, MA 
Epping 


11/26/2006 


William Gomez 
Colleen Parrott 


Epping 
Barrington 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Births 

January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006 

Date of Birth Child's Name 



Parents' Names 



Birthplace 



1/13/2006 


Chanah Brielle Katz 


Sara Katz 
Nathan Katz 


Exeter 


1/24/2006 


Cameron Gibson Arneil 


Amanda Arneil 
Steven Arneil 


Exeter 


1/25/2006 


Owen Richard Warriner 


Laurie Warriner 
Gary Warriner 


Exeter 


1/28/2006 


Ronald Joseph Marino 


Brandi Zukowski 
Ronald Marino 


Exeter 


2/6/2006 


Chloe June Yergeau 


Nicole Bernier 
Jason Yergeau 


Exeter 


2/16/2006 


Alexia Megan Gentgen 


Stephanie Gentgen 
Wayne Gentgen 


Dover 


2/16/2006 


Vincent Eathan Entwistle 


Tammy Entwistle 
Frederick Entwistle 


Exeter 


2/18/2006 


Logan Andrew Martell 


Rebecca Martell 
Andrew Martell 


Dover 


2/19/2006 


Owen Preston Hyde 


Heather McConnell 
Richard Hyde 


Dover 


2/23/2006 


Eva Marie Worcester Simpson 


Elizabeth Worcester 
Jeffrey Simpson 


Nashua 


2/24/2006 


Aria Makenna Smith 


Aimee Zelman-Smith 
Marc Smith 


Exeter 


3/1/2006 


Austin Jay Leach 


Danielle Tyler 
Thomas Leach 


Manchester 


3/10/2006 


Abigail Anita Deary 


Debora Deary 
Sean Deary 


Exeter 


3/16/2006 


Colin James Hallinan 


Angela Hallinan 
Brett Hallinan 


Exeter 


4/8/2006 


Kaylee Elise Moulton 


Kristie Frost 
Jarod Moulton 


Exeter 


4/11/2006 


Cooper Hamish Lawrence 


Jennifer Dudley 
James Lawrence 


Portsmouth 


4/18/2006 


Annabelle Mary Shumway 


Katherine Shumway 
Matthew Shumway 


Portsmouth 


4/25/2006 


Lauren Nicholle Johnson 


Nancy Johnson 
Lawrence Johnson 


Exeter 


n 


u 









2006 Annual Report 






Town of Epping 


Date of Birth 


Child's Name 


Parents' Names 


Birthplace 


4/29/2006 


Donovan Andrew Carroll 


Taylor Carroll 
David Carroll 


Concord 


5/6/2006 


Myleigh Anne Martin 


Stephanie Fiore 
Kevin Martin 


Exeter 


5/10/2006 


Scarlett Francesca Demars 


Jennifer Demars 
Paul Demars 


Portsmouth 


5/30/2006 


Julianna Marie Gates 


Cassandra Gates 
Donald Gates 


Exeter 


6/1/2006 


Luke Patrick McKenzie 


Lisa McKenzie 
Patrick McKenzie 


Exeter 


6/3/2006 


Abigail Helen Zinnecker 


"Wendy Zinnecker 
Bradford Zinnecker 


Exeter 


6/7/2006 


Sarah Emily McTague 


Julie McTague 
Henry McTague 


Dover 


6/10/2006 


Autumn Hope Loving 


Andrea Loving 
Anthony Loving 


Exeter 


6/22/2006 


Trevor James Pelletier 


Deborah Pelletier 
Kenneth Pelletier 


Exeter 


6/26/2006 


Robert Andrew Robinson 


Erika Pethic-Robinson 
Robert Robinson 


Concord 


6/26/2006 


Emma Rose Hynds 


Crystal Hynds 
Daniel Hynds 


Portsmouth 


7/14/2006 


Olivia Ana Milancovici 


Silvia Milancovici 
Octavian Milancovici 


Dover 


7/29/2006 


Rachel Lynn Peirce 


Kelly Maguire 
James Peirce 


Exeter 


8/1/2006 


Keegan Paul Russo 


Jessica Russo 
Richard Russo 


Exeter 


8/3/2006 


Skyler Dream Simard 


Analia Simard 
Scott Simard 


Exeter 


8/10/2006 


Leland Patrick Croumie 


Jessica Murphy 
Sean Croumie 


Exeter 


8/14/2006 


Dennis James Perkins 


Kristine Bragg 
Dennis Perkins 


Exeter 


8/14/2006 


Kimora Ann-Marie Bobb 


Jillian Miglionico 
Kevin Bobb 


Portsmouth 


8/16/2006 


Daniel Everett Ciriello 


Alena Ciriello 
Jamie Ciriello 


Exeter 










tm 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Births (continued) 

Date of Birth Child's Name 



Parents' Names 



Birthplace 



8/16/2006 


Landen Richard Dube 


Stacey Dube 
Marcus Dube 


Exeter 


8/29/2006 


Jakob Allan Martinez 


Samantha Fitton 
Angel Martinez 


Exeter 


9/5/2006 


Mikayla Marie Picard 


Aimee Picard 
Michael Picard 


Exeter 


9/6/2006 


Olivia Grace Rogalski 


Karen Rogalski 
John Rogalski 


Manchester 


9/6/2006 


Nev Michelle Haugh 


Jamie Haugh 
Daniel Haugh 


Portsmouth 


9/14/2006 


Zachary Guy Tessier 


Stephanie Tessier 
Steven Tessier 


Exeter 


9/28/2006 


Troy Robert Coleman 


Laura Coleman 
Richard Coleman 


Exeter 


9/30/2006 


Amelia Marie Harper 


Mary Kathryn Harper 
Kenneth Harper 


Exeter 


10/26/2006 


Piper Noelle Vetter 


Amy Robey 
Charles Vetter 


Exeter 


10/28/2006 


Stella Rose Smith 


Cynthia Smith 
Thomas Smith 


Exeter 


10/31/2006 


Adelaide Elizabeth Amorim Turner 


Linda Turner 
Michael-Dale Turner 


Exeter 


11/3/2006 


Elayna Mary Wright 


Karen Wright 
David Wright 


Exeter 


11/4/2006 


Lili Elaine Fawcett 


Sasha Souther 
Raymond Fawcett 


Exeter 


11/17/2006 


Emma Wiggin Lebroda 


Tanya Lebroda 
Sean Lebroda 


Portsmouth 


11/22/2006 


Riley Joshua Shepp 


Holly Savickas 
Joshua Shepp 


Exeter 


12/2/2006 


Jordyn Emerson Lee 


Cheryl Lee 
Michael Lee 


Exeter 


12/13/2006 


Dylan Thomas Sturgis 


Jami Castine 
Thomas Sturgis 


Exeter 


12/16/2006 


Ryan Robert Thornton 


Carrie Drew 
Sean Thornton 


Exeter 


12/20/2006 


Garrett Mitchell Follansbee 


Jennifer Follansbee 
Glenn Follansbee 


Portsmouth 


n 


u 









2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Deaths 










January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006 








Date of Death 


Place of Death 


Name of Deceased 


Father's Name 


Mother's Name 


1/7/2006 


Exeter 


Roger Donovan Jr 


Roger Donovan Sr 


C Isabel Skinner 


1/22/2006 


Epping 


Pota Wright 


Angelos Pagones 


Stavroula Kyriacopoulos 


2/14/2006 


Manchester 


Janice Noel 


Albion Cross 


Rose Anderson 


2/15/2006 


Epping 


Benjamin Bailey 


Linwood Bailey 


Rosetta Kennerson 


3/2/2006 


Brentwood 


Leo Levesque 


Antonio Levesque 


Florence Caron 


3/9/2006 


Epping 


Harbans Sappal 


Gurcharan Tathgar 


Modinder Gill 


3/10/2006 


Epping 


Robert Duffy 


Phillip Duffy 


Althea Hersey 


3/14/2006 


Epping 


James Johnson 


John Johnson 


Bertha Kaulback 


3/22/2006 


Exeter 


Paul Bishop 


Carrol Bishop 


Ella Porter 


3/30/2006 


Brentwood 


Harold MacNeil 


Seldon MacNeil 


Edna Lively 


4/22/2006 


Epping 


Sharon King 


James King 


Mary Anderson 


5/3/2006 


Exeter 


Gertrude Bishop 


Frank Phelps 


Ivy Munson 


5/6/2006 


Brentwood 


Esther Congdon 


Noel Rines 


Bertha Miller 


5/24/2006 


Brentwood 


Irene Regan 


Octave Lavoie 


Alma Pelletier 


6/5/2006 


Portsmouth 


Jeffrey Nichols 


Erie Nichols 


Doris McKinney 


6/7/2006 


Exeter 


Margaret Phillips 


Elmer King 


Grace Bissett 


6/15/2006 


Epping 


William Clement 


Joseph Clement 


Constance Roberts 


8/22/2006 


Exeter 


Patrick Roberts 


Patrick Roberts 


Edith Flight 


8/26/2006 


Manchester 


Orval Ashley 


(not known) 


Vera Scott 


8/28/2006 


Dover 


Bruce Duchemin 


Frederick Duchemin 


Muriel Cheney 


9/21/2006 


Manchester 


Michael Lewis 


Gordon Lewis Sr 


Eleanor Durgin 


10/4/2006 


Epping 


Elmer Brown 


William Brown 


Mabel Whitney 


10/8/2006 


Epping 


Lucille Forshaw 


Ferdinand Robichaud 


Rosanna Therrien 


10/26/2006 


Exeter 


Madeleine Glover 


Sheldon French 


Fannie Rock 


11/12/2006 


Brentwood 


Leota Glidden 


Leon Denyou 


Lois Purington 


11/16/2006 


Epping 


Bertha Ladd 


Alvin Young 


Marie Chaput 


11/20/2006 


Epping 


Jacqueline Brown 


Joseph Brown 


Gertrude Fecteau 


11/23/2006 


Epping 


Walter Gurski 


(not known) 


(not known) 


11/24/2006 


Portsmouth 


Alice Garnett 


Denton O'Neil 


Alma Brandeis 


11/26/2006 


Epping 


Roger Cote 


William Cote 


Regina Bernier 


12/10/2006 


Epping 


Barbara Pettengill 


Fred Trask 


Jean Flanagan 


12/12/2006 


Exeter 


Annie Wells 


John Wells Jr 


Esther Butler 


12/28/2006 


Epping 


Ralph Droney 


Alfred Droney 


Verna Sprague 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



2007 Town Warrant Articles 



To the inhabitants of the Town of 
Epping, County of Rockingham, in 
the State of New Hampshire, quali- 
fied to vote in town affaire: 

First Session 

You are hereby notified to meet for the First 
(Deliberative) Session of the annual town 
meeting, to be held at the Epping Middle 
High School Auditorium, Epping, NH 
on the sixth day of February 2007 being 
Tuesday, at seven in the evening (7:00 p.m.) 
The First (Deliberative) Session will consist 
of explanation, discussion, and debate of 
each of the following warrant articles, and 
will afford those voters who are present the 
opportunity to propose, debate and adopt 
amendments to each warrant article, except 
those articles whose wording is prescribed 
by state law. 

Second Session 

You are also notified to meet for the Sec- 
ond Session of the annual town meeting, to 
elect town officers by official ballot and to 
vote by official ballot on the warrant articles 
as they may have been amended at the First 
Session, to be held at the Epping Elemen- 
tary School, Epping NH, on the Thirteenth 
day of March 2007, being Tuesday, at eight 
o'clock in the forenoon (the polls are to be 
open at 8:00 a.m. and may not close prior 
to 7:00 p.m.) to act upon the following: 

Article 1: Election of Officers 

To choose necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: 

• Two Board of Adjustment Members 
for three (3) years. 

• Three Budget Committee Members 
for three (3) years. 

• One Budget Committee Member for 
two (2) years. 

• One Cemetery Trustee for three (3) 
years. 

• One Fire Ward for three (3) years. 

• Two Library Trustees for three (3) 
years. 

• One Planning Board Members for 
three (3) years. 



• Two Selectmen for three (3) years. 

• One Trustee of the Trust Funds for 
three (3) years. 

• One Water and Sewer Commissioner 
for three (3) years. 

• One Tax Collector for three (3) years 

• One Town Clerk for three (3) years 

Article 2: AMENDING ARTICLE 19 OF 
ZONING ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 2 as proposed by the Planning 
Board for the town zoning ordinance to 
change Article 19 Signs. This amendment 
will affect anyone proposing new, replac- 
ing or expanding existing signs within all 
zones and districts. This change will not 
affect valid pre-existing non-conform- 
ing signs (grandfathered). In general, 
the amendments will create new process 
whereby the expansion and/or installation 
of new signage related to non-residential 
uses will be reviewed and approved by the 
Planning Board as part of the site plan re- 
view process. The ordinance will authorize 
the Planning Board to adopt new regula- 
tions to administer the change. The intent 
is to streamline the sign review process into 
the site evaluation process with the plan- 
ning board rather than maintain a separate 
approval process for signage. The changes 
are comprehensive in nature and will affect 
all aspects of signage within the Town of 
Epping. [Recommended by the Planning 
Board 4-0-0] 

Article 3: ADOPTING ARTICLE 22 OF 
ZONING ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 3 as proposed by the planning 
board for the town zoning ordinance to 
adopt Article 22, Energy Efficiency and 
Sustainable Design. The Article will apply 
to non-residential and multi-family devel- 
opments (3 or more units per structure). 
The adoption of this article will require 
additional construction, site design, and 
building techniques that promote energy 
efficiency, lower energy costs of the build- 
ings and minimize the environmental im- 



pact of the construction. The article will 
provide a range of options for compliance 
that will include renewable and efficient on- 
site energy production, recycling and reuse 
of site materials, using local resources for 
construction materials, increased efficiency 
in building design, recycling programs for 
construction debris and site operation, and 
a wide range of other design and operational 
options. The article will apply to new devel- 
opments and reconstruction or expansion 
of non-residential and multi-family facili- 
ties. Additional requirements will be place 
on gasoline stations to provide alternative 
fuels in conjunction with any expansion of 
their facility (such as ethanol based fuels 
and biodiesel). The article will not apply 
to existing commercial uses or residential 
structures and will not apply to single-fam- 
ily or duplex residences. [Recommended 
by the Planning Board 4-0-0] 

Article 4: AMENDING ARTICLE 6 OF 
ZONING ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 4 as proposed by the planning 
board for the town zoning ordinance to 
amend Article 6, Supplementary Regula- 
tions for Certain Uses to allow for the ex- 
pansion of existing manufactured housing 
parks in limited circumstances. The change 
will allow existing manufactured housing 
facilities to expand the number of units 
up to 25% provided the facility is in strict 
compliance with applicable local, state, and 
federal requirements. The expansion will 
be based on the number of units existing at 
the time of adoption. The provisions will be 
available only to existing compliant facili- 
ties. Completely new facilities are not per- 
mitted under this change. [Recommended 
by the Planning Board 3-1-0] 

Article 5: AMENDING ARTICLE 6 OF 
ZONING ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 5 as proposed by the planning 
board for the town zoning ordinance to 
amend Article 6, Supplementary Regula- 
tions for Certain uses and Article 12 Defi- 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



nitions to provide additional regulations 
and specifications on the establishment of 
automotive based uses. The changes will 
limit the number placement of automotive 
sales facilities in the Town of Epping by re- 
quiring a minimum distance between such 
sites. Additional requirements for lighting, 
aesthetics, and outdoor storage will also 
be provided. The intent of this change is 
to prevent from proliferation of such uses 
and provide for a well-balanced mix of uses 
in the Town of Epping that serve the com- 
munity. [Recommended by the Planning 
Board 4-0-0] 

Article 6: AMENDING ARTICLE 3 OF 
ZONING ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of Amend- 
ment No. 6 as proposed by the planning 
board for the town zoning ordinance to 
amend Article 3, Industrial Commercial 
Zone and Article 2, Section 6 Residential 
Zone by changing the following parcels from 
Residential to Commercial/Industrial: Map. 
The amendment will include all land south 
and west of Route 27 and all land north and 
east of Route 27 to a distance of 1,500 feet 
from the centerline of Route 27. The change 
will affect the permitted uses for these prop- 
erties to encourage more non-residential 
development in areas that are not already 
developed near Route 27 and to stabilize the 
tax base. Valid, pre-existing uses will be per- 
mitted to continue without further approv- 
als or regulations. Consistent with the above 
all or a portion of Map 30 Lots 46-62, 76, 
80, and 81 and Map 31 Lots 1-8 will be af- 
fected. The map of the proposed changes is 
available at Town Hall. [Recommended by 
the Planning Board 4-0-0] 

Article 7: AMENDING THE ELDERLY 
EXEMPTION 

To see if the Town will vote to modify the 
Elderly Exemption from property tax in the 
Town of Epping, based on assessed value, 
for qualified full time resident taxpayers to 
be as follows: for a person 65 years of age up 
to 75 years, $62,500; for a person 75 years 
up to 80 years, $75,000; for a person 80 
years of age or older $87,500. To qualify, 
the person must have resided in the State 
of New Hampshire at least 3 consecutive 
years preceding April 1, own the real estate 



individually or jointly, or if the real estate is 
owned by such person's spouse, they must 
have been married or a domestic partner for 
at least 5 years. In addition, the taxpayer 
must have a net income of not more than 
$25,000 or, if married, a combined net in- 
come of not more than $35,000, and own 
assets not in excess of $50,000; excluding 
the value of the property this exemption 
is applied to and which is the person's pri- 
mary residence. [Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 5-0] 

Article 8: ADDITIONAL FULL-TIME 
FIRE FIGHTER/EMT 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to hire an addition- 
al full time employee for the Fire Depart- 
ment. The additional Firefighter/EMT will 
be used to facilitate better ambulance and 
fire coverage during the day in addition to 
establishing fire prevention programs and 
to further raise and appropriate the sum of 
Twenty eight thousand dollars ($28,000) 
for six months salary and benefits for the 
employee. Approval would call for a total 
estimated increase in 2008 of $58,000. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 3-2, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 7-1-1] 

Article 9: FUNDS FOR FEDERAL 
LAWSUIT OF EPPING RESIDENTS FOR 
PRINCIPLED GOVERNMENT V. TOWN 
OF EPPING ET.AL. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum often thousand dollars 
($10,000) for the purpose of paying any le- 
gal fees or expenses the town may incur for 
having to appear and defend the town, ex- 
cept for any insurance deductibles, in the 
federal lawsuit, Thomas Sutliffe, Donald Sis- 
son and the Epping Residents for Principled 
Government, Inc. on behalf of themselves and 
all others similarly situated. . .other ERPG 
members whose interest are similarly situated 
include Ron LaChance, Paul Spidle, Nelson 
Gunn and Malcom Hayes v. Epping School 
District, The Town of Epping, Barbara Mun- 
sey, as Superintendent of Schools, Harold K 
LaPierre, as Moderator for the Epping School 
District; Susan McGeough, Thomas Gauthi- 
er, Christopher Murphy and Kim Sullivan, 
in their individual and official capacities as 



members of the Epping Board of Selectmen; 
Marci Morris, Jeffrey Nollet, Susan Kimball, 
Pamela Tibbetts, Scott Booth, Robert Lonek 
and Jeffery LeDuc, in their individual and 
official capacities as members of the Epping 
School Board; and Mark A. Vallone, Prin- 
cipal in his individual and official capacity.. 
This sum is in addition to the legal expense 
line item in the proposed operating budget. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 5-0, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 7-1-1] 

Article 10: TOWN HALL 
IMPROVEMENT EXPENDABLE TRUST 

To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000) to be placed in the previously 
established Town Hall Improvement Ex- 
pendable Trust Fund. This sum will come 
from fund balance and no additional funds 
will be raised through taxation. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 8-0-1] 

Article 11: LANDFILL CLOSURE FUND 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dol- 
lars ($5,000) to be deposited into the exist- 
ing Landfill Closure Capital Reserve Fund. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 4-1, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 8-0-1] 

Article 12: AMEND THE DISABLED 
VETERANS TAX CREDIT 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Disabled Veterans Tax Credit in accor- 
dance with RSA 72:35 from $1,400.00 to 
the current maximum allowable amount of 
$2,000.00. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0] 

Article 13: HIGHWAY BACKHOE LEASE 

To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
five (5) year agreement for the purpose 
of leasing and equipping one backhoe for 
the Highway Department; and to raise 
and appropriate the amount of Eighteen 
Thousand Three Hundred Twenty dollars 
($18,320.00) for the first year's payment. 
This lease will contain a non-appropria- 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



tion clause and is expected to cost a total of 
Ninety One Thousand Six Hundred dollats 
($91,600) with a One dollat ($1.00) pur- 
chase option at the end of the lease term. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 4-1, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 8-0-1] 

Article 14: RECREATION PASSENGER 
VAN 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Eleven Thousand 
Dollars ($11,000) for the purchase of a used 
passenger van. This van will be a Passen- 
ger Van or similar vehicle for the purpose 
of transportation of Senior Citizens, youth 
and family participants during Recreation 
Department sponsored trips. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 7-1-1] 

Article 15: CARPET REPLACEMENT AT 
WATSON ACADEMY 

To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
the sum of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000) 
for the purpose of removing and installing 
new carpets at the Watson Academy. [Rec- 
ommended by the Board of Selectmen 
3-2, Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 6-2-1] 

Article 16: ADDITIONAL PART-TIME 
LIBRARY EMPLOYEE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $6,500 (six thousand, 
five hundred dollars) for the hiring of an ad- 
ditional part-time library assistant to work 
a schedule that would allow the library to 
be open on Mondays. This amount repre- 
sents all compensation and benefits for 12 
months. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 3-2, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 6-2-1] 

Article 17: HIGHWAY COMPLEX 
CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 

To see if the municipality will vote to es- 
tablish a Capital Reserve Fund under the 
provisions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of 
designing and constructing a new High- 
way Facility and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of twenty five thousand dollars 
($25,000) to be placed in this fund. In ad- 



dition, to name the Board of Selectmen as 
agents of this fund. The selectmen and the 
budget committee recommend this appro- 
priation. (Majority vote required). [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 3-2, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 6-2-1] 

Article 18: FUNDS FOR ETV 

To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $17,799.08 to be 
placed in the previously established Epping 
Television Expendable Trust Fund. These 
funds represent the difference between the 
Epping Television Operating Budget and 
the amount of money collected in franchise 
fees in 2006. This sum will come from the 
fund balance and will have no impact on 
the tax rate. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0; Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 8-0-1] 

Article 19: FULL-TIME HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEE 

To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to hire an additional 
full time employee for the Highway De- 
partment. This person is needed to assist in 
the day to day road work as well as pos- 
sible maintenance and minor repairs to the 
highway vehicles. This person is also need- 
ed to cover for current employee vacations 
and sick days and to raise and appropriate 
Thirty-two thousand eight hundred dollars 
($32,800.00) including salary and benefits. 
[Not Recommended by the Board of Se- 
lectmen 3-2, Not Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-4] 

Article 20: THREE YEAR COLLECTIVE 
BARGAINING AGREEMENT WITH THE 
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF 
POLICE OFFICERS 

To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the cost items included in the collective 
bargaining agreement reached between 
the Town of Epping and the International 
Brotherhood of Police Officers, which calls 
for the following increases in salaries and 
benefits: 

Year Estimated Increase 

2007 $53,786 

2008 $25,070 

2009 $26,015 



And further to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifty Three Thousand Seven Hun- 
dred Eighty Six Dollars ($53, 786.00) for 
the 2007 budget, such sum representing 
the additional costs attributable to the in- 
creases in salaries and benefits over those 
appropriations at current staffing levels paid 
in the prior budget year of 2006. [Not Rec- 
ommended by the Board of Selectmen 4- 
1, Not Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 6-1-2] 

Article 21: PURCHASING LAND NEXT 
TO TOWN HALL 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($100,000), said sum to 
be used, along with other monies held by 
the planning board and conservation com- 
mission and for which no appropriation is 
needed to expend such other funds, for the 
purchase of a parcel of property known as 
Tax Map 29, Lot 137, having approximately 
0.67 acres, and which is located adjacent to 
Town Hall, with frontage on the Lamprey 
River. It is anticipated that this parcel shall 
be used for recreation and conservation 
purposes. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 9-0] 

Article 22: TO REMOVE THE ANNUAL 
CAP ON THE LAND USE CHANGE TAX 

To see if the Town will vote to remove the 
annual cap on the revenue transferred from 
the Land Use Change Tax to the Conser- 
vation Fund. This Article will not alter the 
tax rate. [Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen 4-1] 

Article 23: TO CHANGE CLASS VI 
ROADS TO CLASS A TRAILS 

To see if the town will vote to convert the 
following portions of Class VI Roads into 
Class A Trails: 

• Dimond Hill Road, from Rum Brook 
south to Route 87 

• Range Road, from North River Road 
east to Dimond Hill Road 

• Birch Road, from Mast Road south to 
the Town Line 

[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 5-0] 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



Article 24: CONTRIBUTION TO ADULT 
TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars ($500.00) to be distributed to 
the Adult Tutorial Program for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2007. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Bud- 
get Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 25: CONTRIBUTION TO AIDS 
RESPONSE SEACOAST 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Five Hundred Twenty 
Five Dollars ($525.00) to be distributed to 
the AIDS Response Seacoast for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2007. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 26: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
AMERICAN RED CROSS — GREAT BAY 
CHAPTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Five Hundred Dollars 
($500.00) to be distributed to American 
Red Cross - Great Bay Chapter for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2007. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 27: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
AREA HOMECARE AND FAMILY 
SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Six 
Hundred and Ten Dollars ($2,610) to be 
distributed to Area Homecare & Family 
Services for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2007. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 28: CONTRIBUTION TO CHILD 
AND FAMILY SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Four Thousand Dol- 



lars ($4,000) to be distributed to Child & 
Family Services for services estimated to be 
rendered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2007. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 29: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
COMMUNITY DIVERSION PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Five 
Hundred and Ninety Dollars ($1,590) to 
be distributed to Community Diversion 
Program for services estimated to be ren- 
dered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2007. [Not Recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen 5-0, Not Recom- 
mended by the Municipal Budget Com- 
mittee 8-0-1] 

Article 30: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
LAMPREY HEALTH CARE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Seven Hundred Eighty Dollars ($3,780) to 
be distributed to Lamprey Health Care for 
services estimated to be rendered to resi- 
dents of the Town during the year 2007. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 5-0, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 31: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
RICHIE MCFARLAND CHILDREN'S 
CENTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Eight Hundred Fifty Dollars ($3,850) to be 
distributed to McFarland Children's Cen- 
ter for services estimated to be rendered to 
residents of the Town during the year 2007. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 5-0, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 32: CONTRIBUTION TO 
THE RETIRED SENIOR VOLUNTEER 
PROGRAM 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Hundred 
Dollars ($300) to be distributed to Retired 
Senior Volunteer Program for services es- 
timated to be rendered to residents of the 
Town during the year 2007. [Recom- 



mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 33: CONTRIBUTION TO THE 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY COMMUNITY 
ACTION 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Ten Thousand Two 
Hundred Eighty-Five Dollars ($10,285) to 
be distributed to Rockingham Co. Com- 
munity Action for services estimated to be 
rendered to residents of the Town during the 
year 2007. [Recommended by the Board 
of Selectmen 5-0, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 34: CONTRIBUTION TO 
ROCKINGHAM NUTRITION AND 
MEALS ON WHEELS 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Ten Dollars ($3,910) 
to be distributed to Rockingham Nutri- 
tion & Meals On Wheels for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of 
the Town during the year 2007. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Bud- 
get Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 35: CONTRIBUTION TO A SAFE 
PLACE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred Dol- 
lars ($500) to be distributed to A Safe Place 
for services estimated to be rendered to resi- 
dents of the Town during the year 2007. 
[Recommended by the Board of Select- 
men 5-0, Recommended by the Munici- 
pal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 36: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEACOAST HOSPICE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($1,500) to be distributed 
to Seacoast Hospice for services estimated 
to be rendered to residents of the Town 
during the year 2007. [Recommended 
by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, Recom- 
mended by the Municipal Budget Com- 
mittee 5-3-1] 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



Article 37: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEACOAST MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) to be distrib- 
uted to Seacoast Mental Health for services 
estimated to be rendered to residents of the 
Town during the year 2007. [Not Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Not Recommended by the Municipal 
Budget Committee 8-0-1] 

Article 38: CONTRIBUTION TO 
SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT SERVICES 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Two 
Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($1,250) to be 
distributed to Sexual Assault Support Ser- 
vices for services estimated to be rendered 
to residents of the Town during the year 
2007. [Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen 5-0, Recommended by the 
Municipal Budget Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 39: 2007 OPERATING BUDGET 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate as an operating budget, not in- 



cluding appropriations by special warrant 
articles and other appropriations voted sep- 
arately, the amounts set forth on the bud- 
get posted with the warrant or as amended 
by vote of the first session, for the purposes 
set forth therein, totaling five million three 
hundred thirty-three thousand sixty-six 
dollars ($5,333,066). Should this article be 
defeated, the default budget shall be five 
million fifteen thousand three hundred 
eighty-six dollars ($5,015,386), which is the 
same as last year, with certain adjustments 
required by previous action of the Town or 
by law or the governing body may hold one 
special meeting, in accordance with RSA 
40:13, X and XVI, to take up the issue of 
a revised operating budget only. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 5-3-1] 

Article 40: By Petition: 
CONTRIBUTION TO LAMPREY RIVER 
YOUTH SOCCER 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Dol- 
lars ($2,000) to be distributed to Lamprey 



River Youth Soccer. [Recommended by 
the Board of Selectmen 5-0, Recom- 
mended by the Municipal Budget Com- 
mittee 8-0-1] 

Article 41: By Petition: CONTRIBUTION 
TO THE EPPING YOUTH ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand 
Dollars ($3,000) in support of the Epping 
Youth Athletic Association. [Recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0, 
Recommended by the Municipal Budget 
Committee 8-1] 

Article 42: By Petition: INCREASING 
THE OPTIONAL VETERAN'S TAX 
CREDIT TO $500 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Optional Veterans Tax Credit in accor- 
dance with RSA 72:28, II to the current 
maximum allowable amount of $500.00. 



TownofEpping 2006 Annual Report 



2007 Town Budget 



MS-7 



BUDGET OF THE TOWN 
WITH A MUNICIPAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



OF: Epping 



BUDGET FORM FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED 
THE PROVISIONS OF RSA 32:14 THROUGH 32.24 

Appropriations and Estimates of Revenue for the Ensuing Year January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007 
or Fiscal Year From __to 

IMPORTANT: 

Please read RSA 32:5 applicable to all municipalities. 



1. Use this form to list the entire budget in the appropriate recommended and not recommended area. 
This means the operating budget and all special and individual warrant articles must be posted. 

2. Hold at least one public hearing on this budget. 

3. When completed, a copy of the budget must be posted with the warrant. Another copy must be 
placed on file with the town clerk, and a copy sent to the Department of Revenue Administration 
at the address below. 



This form was posted with the warrant on (DateK ktts^^&cXV ex"" ' 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

A • Please sign in ink. - 






-r?? 



y ) 



THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT 



FOR DRA USE ONLY 



NH DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION 

P.O. BOX 487, CONCORD, NH 03302-0487 

(603)271-3397 



MS-7 
Rev. 08/05 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



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2006 Annual Report 



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2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



MS-7 Budget - Town/City of Epping_ 



FY 2007 



"SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES"' 



Special warrant articles are defined in RSA 32:3, VI, as appropriations: 1 ) in petitioned warrant articles; 2) appropriations raised by bonds or notes; 
3) appropriations to a separate fund created pursuant to law, such as capital reserve funds or trusts funds; or 4) an appropriation designated 
on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapsing or nontransferable article. 

1 2 3456789 



Appropriations 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS Warr. Prior Year As 

(RSA32:3,V) Art.« Appr oved b yJ)RA_ 



Actual SELECTMEN'S APPROPRIATIONS 
Expenditures Ensuing Fiscal Year 
Pnpr Year^ (recommended) inot recommended) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE'S APPROPRIATIONS 
Ensuing Fiscal Year 

RECOMMENDED NOT RECOMMENDED 





Lamprey River Youth Soccor 




1000 


1000 


1000 




1000 






Epping Youth Athletic Assoc 




3000 


3000 


3000 




3000 












































































SUBTOTAL2 RECOMMENDED 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


4000 


XXXXXXXXX 


4000 


XXXXXXXXX 



'INDIVIDUAL WARRANT ARTICLES" 



"Individual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special warrant articles". An example of an individual warrant article might be negotiated 
cost items for labor agreements, leases or items of a one time nature you wish to address individually. 

1 2 3456789 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 
(RSA 32:3,V) 



Appiop nations 
Warr. Prior Year As 

Art.# Approved by DRA 



Actual 
Expenditures 



SELECTMEN'S APPROPRIATIONS BUDGET COMMITTEE'S APPROPRIATIONS 

Ensuing Fiscal Year Ensuing Fiscal Year 

JREC QMMENOED) (NOT RECOMM ENDED) RECOMMENDED NOT RECOMMENDED 





ERPG Lawsuit 








10000 




10000 






uVatson Academy Carpet 








10000 




10000 






ETV Trust Fund 




19343 


19343 












Town Hall Repair. Trust Fund 




20000 


20000 


20000 




zoooo 






Recreation Van Purchase 








11000 




11000 






Land Purchase 








100000 




100000 






Library PT Employee 








6600 




6600 






Fire Fighter FT Employee 








28000 




28000 






Highway FT Employee 










32800 




32800 




BPO Union Contract 










S3786 




63 786 




American Red Cross 




600 


G00 


GOO 




600 






Highway Bachhoo Lease 








18320 




18320 






Landfill Closure 








5000 




5000 






Aids Response Scacoast 




62G 


626 


626 




S2G 






Richie Mcfarland Children** 




3BS0 


3860 


3850 




3B60 






Area Homcmafcers 




2610 


2610 


2G10 




2610 






Adult Tutorial Program 




600 


GOO 


500 




500 






Seacoasl Hospice 




1500 


1500 


1600 




1600 






Big Brothers/Big Slslcrs 




1620 















Child B. Family Services 




4000 


4000 


4000 




4000 






A Safe Place 




500 


600 


500 




500 






Rockinham County CAP 




102B5 


10285 


1028G 




102B5 






Lamprey Health Cam 




3780 


3780 


3780 




3780 






Retired Sr Vol Program 




300 


300 


300 




300 






Sexual As sua u Support Scrv 




1250 


1260 


1260 




1250 






Rochlnham Nutrition Prog 




391D 


3910 


3510 




3910 






Community Diversion Program 










1690 




1G90 




Scacoast Mental Health Center 










1O00 




1000 




CompaetarfConlalnei for Transfer Station 




30000 


24661 












Police COPS Grant 




4213G 


19130.3 












Lease/Purchase ol Ambulance 




39000 


1fi124.11 










SUBTOTAL 3 RECOMMENDED 


XXXXXXXXX 


G 

XXXXXXXXX 


242330 


XXXXXXXXX 


242330 


XXXXXXXXX 



MS-7 
Rev. OBffJS 



Town of Epping 



2006 Annual Report 



MS-7 



Budget - Town/City of Epping 



FY 2007 
5 



ACCT.# 



SOURCE OF REVENUE 



Warr. 
Art.# 



Estimated Revenues 
Prior Year 



Actual 
Revenues 
Prior Year 



Estimated 

Revenues 

Ensuing Year 





TAXES 




xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3120 


Land Use Change Taxes - General Fund 




330000 


387000 


150000 


3180 


Resident Taxes 










3185 


Timber Taxes 




2200 


3395.91 


2500 


3186 


Payment in Lieu of Taxes 










3139 


Other Taxes 










3190 


Interest & Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 




86550 


100451.34 


63000 




Inventory Penalties 










3187 


Excavation Tax ($.02 cents per cu yd) 













LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3210 


Business Licenses & Permits 




36800 


30876.81 


36800 


3220 


Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 




950000 


972950.78 


950000 


3230 


Building Permits 




59500 


74948 


65300 


3290 


Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 




6650 


7497.1 


7150 


3311-3319 


FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 




51145.3 


51145.3 







FROM STATE 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3351 


Shared Revenues 




35758 


61750 


35000 


3352 


Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution 




231445 


231445.24 


231445 


3353 


Highway Block Grant 




131372 


131372.4 


130000 


3354 


Water Pollution Grant 










3355 


Housing & Community Development 










3356 


State & Federal Forest Land Reimbursement 










3357 


Flood Control Reimbursement 










3359 


Other (Including Railroad Tax) 




46000 


62830.5 


41000 


3379 


FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS 













CHARGES FOR SERVICES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3401-3406 


Income from Departments 




151300 


193038.83 


167100 


3409 


Other Charges 




115800 


136197.75 


120300 





MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3501 


Sale of Municipal Property 




40000 


45091.91 




3502 


Interest on Investments 




60000 


83438.55 


60000 


3503-3509 


Other 




10300 


11171.24 


2000 



INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 



XXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXX 



3912 



3913 



From Special Revenue Funds 



From Capital Projects Funds 



159000 



137783.11 



120000 



MS-7 
Rev. 08/05 



2006 Annual Report 



Town of Epping 



MS-7 



Budget - Town/City of Epping 



FY 2007 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


ACCT.# 


Warr. 
SOURCE OF REVENUE Art.# 


Estimated Revenues 
Prior Year 


Actual 
Revenues 
Prior Year 


Estimated 

Revenues 

Ensuing Year 


INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN cont. 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3914 


From Enterprise Funds 












Sewer - (Offset) 




703393.63 


703393.63 


747831 




Water - (Offset) 




312387.13 


312387.13 


499660 




Electric - (Offset) 












Airport - (Offset) 










3915 


From Capital Reserve Funds 










3916 


From Trust & Fiduciary Funds 










3917 


Transfers from Conservation Funds 












OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3934 


Proc. from Long Term Bonds & Notes 










Amounts VOTED From F/B ("Surplus") 




39343 


39343 


35000 


Fund Balance ("Surplus") to Reduce Taxes 










TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE & CREDITS 


3558944.06 


3777508.53 


34S4086 



'BUDGET SUMMARY* 





PRIOR YEAR 
ADOPTED BUDGET 


SELECTMEN'S 
RECOMMENDED BUDGET 


BUDGET COMMITTEE'S 
RECOMMENDED BUDGET 


SUBTOTAL 1 Appropriations Recommended (from pg. 5) 


4881102.81 


5333066 


5333066 


SUBTOTAL 2 Special Warrant Articles Recommended (from pg. 6) 


4000 


4000 


4000 


SUBTOTAL 3 "Individual" Warrant Articles Recommended (from pg. 6) 


185608 


242330 


242330 


TOTAL Appropriations Recommended 


5070710.81 


5579396 


5579396 


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues & Credits (from above) 


3558944.06 


3464086 


3464086 


Estimated Amount of Taxes to be Raised 


1511766.75 


2115310 


2115310 



Maximum Allowable Increase to Budget Committee's Recommended Budget per RSA 32:18: 
(See Supplemental Schedule With 10% Calculation) 



MS-7 
Rev. 08/05 



Epping School District 
2006 Annual Report 




Epping School District 2006 Annual Report 

Epping School District Officers 

2006-2007 

School Board 

Susan Kimball, Chairman Term Expires 2007 

Scott Booth, Vice Chairman Term Expires 2007 

Jeffrey LeDuc Term Expires 2008 

Robert Lonek Term Expires 2008 

Pamela Tibbetts Term Expires 2009 

Barbara D. Munsey, Superintendent of Schools 

Gary Tirone, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum 

Martha Williamson, Business Administrator 

Cathy Zylinski, Special Services Administrator 

School Principals 

MarkVallone, Grades PK— 5 

Lyn Healy, Grades 6—8 

Dixie Bacallao Tremblay, Grades 9 —12 

School District Officers 

Joe Foley, School District Treasurer 

Robin O'Day, School District Clerk 

Robert Goodrich, School District Moderator 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



Letters to the Community 



School Board 

Last year at this time we were all wonder- 
ing when construction of the middle school 
addition, new high school gymnasium, and 
other renovations would get underway. It 
has been a year since the citizens of Epping 
voted to approve the building project and 
everyone was getting anxious to see some 
tangible progress. The official start of that 
progress took place on Saturday, March 25, 
2006 during a groundbreaking ceremony 
held on the field behind the high school. 
Several town and school officials, both past 
and present, participated in the morning 
festivities that were well-attended by many 
folks in town. However the highlight of 
the day was seeing many of our Epping 
students don hard hats and ceremonial 
shovels to move the first scoops of soil! This 
culminating event was truly a memorable 
moment for all who had worked so hard to 
bring this much-needed building project to 
fruition. 

At this time I am pleased to report 
that not only is the project well under- 
way, but it is on schedule and on budget. 
The doors are scheduled to open when the 
2007-2008 school year starts in Septem- 
ber (yes, school will start after Labor Day). 
We have an extremely dedicated Building 
Committee whose members have devoted 
countless hours to this project and we are 
grateful for their efforts. It is their commit- 
ment that keeps the project rolling along so 
smoothly. 

Some of you have inquired about the 
possibility of viewing the building during 
the construction phase. Unfortunately, due 
to the liability involved, only authorized 
personnel are currently allowed beyond the 
construction fence. This may change as the 
construction nears completion and many 
of the hazards are eliminated. However, as 
of this writing, a video of the project is be- 
ing edited and is slated to air on Channel 
22 EPTV starting in February. Also a slide 
show of the construction photos can be 
viewed on our www.saul4.org website. 

I'd also like to thank everyone for 



the patience and understanding you've 
displayed while dealing with the incon- 
veniences of the construction. I know it's 
been quite frustrating at times but, as I 
promised last year, the final product will be 
well worth it! 

On the ballot this year you will see 
only four warrant articles pertaining to the 
schools, all of which have received the ap- 
proval of both the School Board and Bud- 
get Committee. The first is a three-year col- 
lective bargaining agreement between the 
Epping School Board and the Epping Edu- 
cation Association. This proposed contract 
has several benefits including a decrease in 
the district contribution for teacher health 
premiums, salary adjustments which would 
enable the district to be competitive with 
state and regional average teacher compen- 
sation, and the addition of one more day to 
the work year of the teaching staff. . .just to 
name a few. 

Article 2 would allow for a special 
meeting if Article 1 is defeated. This would 
permit the district to renegotiate with the 
teacher's union and present cost items to 
the voters. This would have no tax impact. 

Article 3 would also have zero tax im- 
pact by approving the use of bond interest 
to offset HVAC costs incurred with the 
new middle school addition. As agreed, the 
district has already applied $238,238 of in- 
terest earnings from the project to offset the 
bond cost. We have been able to earn ap- 
proximately $400,000 of additional bond 
interest revenue which, with approval, the 
District would like to apply against the 
unanticipated expense of the air condition- 
ing. It is important to note that we had in- 
tended to fund these HVAC costs from the 
contingency fund, but due to factors such 
as unsuitable soil conditions, unantici- 
pated requirements from the Department 
of Environmental Services, and mandated 
upgrades to the fire alarm system in the ex- 
isting school, a large portion of the contin- 
gency fund has been depleted. 

The last warrant article is our 2007- 
2008 operating budget. Once again, the 
School Board and Budget Committee 



have worked together to present a fiscally 
responsible budget. At the request of the 
Budget Committee over $361,000 was cut 
from the budget that was originally pro- 
posed, resulting in a figure that is only 
$48,338 higher than the default budget. 
The proposed budget will allow us to make 
the changes required to comply with state 
and federal requirements for a District in 
Need of Improvement and No Child Left 
Behind. It also provides for increased util- 
ity costs, as well as the additional person- 
nel and supplies needed to open and op- 
erate the new middle school addition and 
high school gym. 

It is also important to note that the 
school district had a fund balance of 



Enrollment 

As of 10/2/2006 



Grade 

1 



2 


76 


3 


78 


4 


81 


5 


73 


Middle School 


6 


71 


7 


79 


8 


78 


High School 


9 


88 


10 


103 


11 


110 



12 

Total Enrollment 
for Grades 1-12: 

Kindergarten 
Enrollment: 



Elementary 
School 

69 

76 

78 

81 

73 

Scl 

71 

79 

78 

Scl 

88 

103 

110 

69 

975 
69 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



$ 201,760 last year, which was returned to 
the town's General Fund. 

I will close by recommending that 
you read the other articles written by our 
school administrators and committees that 
are also published in this Annual School 
Report. They provide excellent informa- 
tion regarding other initiatives and im- 
provements that are currently taking place 
in our schools. 

As always, we wish to express sincere 
thanks to our administrators, teachers, 
staff, and volunteers for their unending 
dedication to our students. We also give 
special thanks to everyone who takes the 
time to vote for your continued support in 
educating our young citizens of Epping. 
They are, afterall, the future of our town, 
the great State of New Hampshire, and our 
country. If we serve them well, they will 
serve us well in return. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Susan H. Kimball, Chair 

On behalf of the Epping School Board: 
Scott Booth, Vice Chair 
Pamela Tibbetts 
Jeffrey LeDuc 
Robert Lonek 



Superintendent of 
Schools 

In the last annual report the journey from 
a good school to a great school was intro- 
duced along with our charge to steadily 
march to our greatness and to sustain it 
along the way. To achieve this, the dis- 
trict needed to have disciplined people, 
thought, and action in that order and to 
confront the brutal facts. 

This school year the district has refined 
the administrative structure in all three 
schools and matched our human resources 
to the needs of the schools. The district has 
also adopted four goals addressing student 
achievement, respectful school and learning 
culture, professional growth, and curricu- 
lum mapping. Action plans were developed 
by school and central office administrators 
to support these goals. 



We continue to confront the bru- 
tal facts particularly in the school district 
budget. Next school year the cost of the 
proposed budget is attributed equally to a 
revenue loss and an expenditure increase. 
The district continues to lose revenue from 
Fremont high school students withdraw- 
ing and the restructuring of state aid. Es- 
calating expenditures in health insurance, 
retirement contributions, utility costs, and 
special education have exacerbated the fi- 
nancial situation. The good news is that 
we will be opening the new middle school 
classroom addition, two more renovated 
high school science labs, and a new high 
school gymnasium. The bad news is that 
we will not be able to sustain our student 
programming as the district will not be 
able to keep pace with increasing costs and 
decreasing revenue sources. 

We have also gained one additional 
brutal fact and that is being designated a 
"district in need of improvement" per No 
Child Left Behind. The district for the past 
two consecutive years has not met the defi- 
nition of proficiency in the area of reading 
as determined by the NH Department of 
Education using standardized state testing. 
Proficiency has been defined as meeting a 
minimum performance target number on 
the reading standardized test for students in 
grades 3 to 8 and grade 10. It is important 
to note that performance targets must be 
met in all subgroups of students including 
the whole school, racial and ethnic groups, 
socioeconomically disadvantaged, educa- 
tional disability, and non- or limited-Eng- 
lish proficient students. Students grouped 
as socioeconomically disadvantaged and 
educationally disabled did not meet these 



reading performance targets resulting in 
the "district in need of improvement" des- 
ignation. 

Being designated a "district in need of 
improvement" has significantly impacted 
the district this school year requiring a 
change in direction from the district pro- 
cess to a state directed process. A "district 
improvement planning team" has been 
meeting to review student data, attend state 
training sessions, and develop an improve- 
ment plan for reading. During this process 
the alignment of district curriculum to 
state grade level expectations, implemen- 
tation of a consistent reading and writing 
program throughout the district, and fo- 
cus on data-driven instruction were iden- 
tified as areas of priority. The good news 
is that the three priority areas align with 
existing school district goals and school 
initiatives already underway. The bad news 
is that it will require meeting the state's 
timetable and criteria, putting some initia- 
tives on hold, implementing some of our 
initiatives differently than originally in- 
tended, and reallocating district resources 
to address the "district in need of improve- 
ment" reading designation. There will be 
some tough choices ahead as the district 
will not be able to address the "district in 
need of improvement" status and provide 
all the student programming and services 
as in past years. 

Unfortunately, we have arrived at the 
point where local, state, and federal deci- 
sion making and policy have collided, and 
we no longer have the resources to sustain 
things as they are. The failure of the coop- 
erative school district and the long term 
tuition agreement with Fremont has re- 



Statistical Data: School Year 2005-2006 




Average Daily 
Membership 


Percent of 
Attendance 


Elementary 


371.1 


96.2 


Middle School 


251.9 


95.3 


High School 


396.0 


91.3 


Kindergarten 


30.8 


94.8 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



suited in the loss of revenue to offset costs. 
Commercial development has increased the 
town's property valuation and resulted in 
less state funding. The state has implement- 
ed revised standards for school approval re- 
quiring more of our schools, and the state 
per federal guidelines has designated us a 
district in need with $25,000 in federal 
funds for this purpose. 

If we as a community, society, and 
nation expect our schools to do more and 
have higher student expectations, schools 
will need more resources. Reallocating ex- 
isting resources will only get us so far, and 
there lies the problem. Under the current 
federal/state education funding system, 
the only solution at the moment is to pass 
it on to the local taxpayer, and that is not 
acceptable. 

I will admit that we as a district have 
areas to improve upon and we will address 
those areas. However, I also offer that our 
political leadership has failed us. Please 
visit the district website at www.saul4.org 
to view information regarding the budget 
and "district in need of improvement" 
designation or to contact state and federal 
legislators. 

We will continue to do what Epping 
has always done — do the best we can with 
what we have. Epping is a community 
strong in mind and heart, and we must 
hold on to that in the days ahead. 

Barbara D. Munsey 



Assistant 
Superintendent 

The Epping School District is currently 
initiating and continuing a number of 
initiatives to support the development of 
curriculum and instruction in each of the 
schools; and attempting to systematically 
coordinate those efforts PreK-12. Accom- 
plishing our goals in these areas, requires 
us to be mindful of a number of learning 
relationships that must evolve not only be- 
tween adults and students, but also between 
adults in our school community. 

Because of mandated policy like No 
Child Left Behind and the resulting des- 



ignations of schools and districts in need of 
improvement ( a phenomenon that will po- 
tentially impact a majority of schools and 
districts in our country), it is a necessity to 
focus on both adult and student learning 
and development in our schools. Roland 
Barth, author of Improving Schools from 
Within, uses an interesting metaphor to 
make this point when he writes, "...consid- 
er the common instructions given by flight 
attendants to airline passengers: For those 
of you traveling with small children, in the 
event of an oxygen failure, first place the 
mask on your own face and then-and only 
then-place the mask on your child's face. 
The fact of the matter is, of course, that the 
adult must be alive to help the child." A 
conclusion that can be drawn from Barth 's 
example is that we need to emphasize and 
ensure that we provide the means and time 
for adult learning development to take 
place in our schools on an ongoing basis in 
order to realize a measurable, sustained im- 
pact for students. 

Keeping in mind the learning relation- 
ships that must take place and the strong 
connections those relationships must have 
to quality instruction and student learning 
and achievement, it is important to note 
that each of the schools are currently in- 
volved with several high quality profession- 
al development programs, some with col- 
lege or university affiliations, and primarily 
focused on the instructional and literacy 
issues that should have the greatest impact 
across content areas and grade levels. Dis- 
trict initiatives in place to support these 
school efforts and plan for future PreK-12 
coherence include: 

■ A committee has been formed to 
meet the NHDOE requirement for a Pro- 
fessional Development Master Plan. This is 
perhaps our most significant undertaking 
this year because it will define not only the 
methods by which adults in our schools will 
be recertified and evaluated; but it will also 
create expectations for adult professional 
development that will move the learning 
culture in our schools to one that includes 
more inquiry and collaboration for both 
students and adults. It will focus on data 
and evidence for learning, which should 
positively impact the level and possibility 
for achievement by all. 



■ We are in the third and final year 
of a grant funded mentoring program that 
has provided a number of opportunities for 
new teachers to our district to observe and 
incorporate quality instruction into their 
classrooms as well as become better accli- 
mated to the ancillary expectations of their 
job. This type of program benefits both new 
and established faculty with the influx and 
sharing of established and new practices. It 
has also helped to reduce the turnover of 
teachers in our district these past few years. 
We will continue to offer the mentoring 
program next year and explore opportuni- 
ties for grant funding. 

■ The NHDOE has also put in 
place Information, Communication, and 
Technology(ICT) Standards with expec- 
tations that students will have electronic 
portfolios at the end of Grade 8 which dis- 
play some of their work across content areas 
along with their ability to integrate various 
uses of technology into that work. Addi- 
tionally, benchmarks for technology will 
need to be incorporated into our curricu- 
lum K-12. A committee of staff members 
representing each of the schools has been 
meeting throughout the year to advance 
this expectation and requirement. 

■ Our curriculum mapping efforts 
have had to factor in additional variables due 
to District in Need of Improvement issues 
which command priority and the new State 
Frameworks (GLEs/GSEs) which require 
curriculum alignment decisions PreK-12. 
We continue to offer professional develop- 
ment to support Elementary School efforts 
with math and literacy, and some content 
areas at the Middle and High Schools. 

The above simply highlights some of 
the areas being addressed in professional 
development, curriculum, and instruction. 
A more complete picture can be accessed 
by following the curriculum and instruc- 
tion link at the saul4.org website. There, 
community members can find the posted 
State Frameworks(GLEs/GSEs) to which 
our curriculum is connected. Also, there 
are additional links that can help adults 
connect with children and their learning. 

It's an exciting and opportune time for 
the Epping Community with the opening 
of a new Middle School facility, the addi- 
tions and refurbishing of the High School, 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 




and the increased instructional space for 
the Elementary School. While the new 
construction will enhance the learning en- 
vironment and culture, it also opens pos- 
sibilities we can now entertain as a learning 
community. 

Gary Tirone 



Building Committee 

Construction of the middle school addition 
is proceeding on schedule with teachers and 
staff due to move in over the summer. The 
building is a tribute to town support and 
will address overcrowding with the separa- 
tion of middle school and high school stu- 
dents. It also provides a new high school 
gymnasium that will be available for use by 
the entire community. 

The middle school facility will be 
open year round to accommodate sum- 
mer school, teacher trainings, and town 
recreation events as well as regular school 
year programs. Early in the construction 
process, the Building Committee and 
School Board decided to add central air 
conditioning to the original HVAC plans 
to address overheating in the summer. It is 
much less expensive to include central air 
in the building process now than it would 
be to go back later and put it in. The State 
is requiring more each year in terms of air 
quality in public facilities, and it is likely 
that central air will be a requirement in 
future. The high summer usage, possible 
forthcoming State requirements and sav- 
ings from acting now rather than later all 
contributed to the decision to add central 
air at this point. You will note that warrant 
article included to request the approval of 
funds for this purpose. 

Architect Frank Marinace and con- 
tractor CCI (Conneston Construction 
Inc.) have done a superb job coordinating 
with staff and administration to remain 
on schedule with the new construction 
while minimizing the disruption to school 
events. Staff, students and the community 
have been patient and accommodating to 
changes in sports venues, temporary reduc- 
tion in available parking and adjustments 
to traffic flow around the schools. 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 




1 * "^ / / \V j/l ,/ I- 




Stage Area 



New Gym Girders 




Second Floor Staging 



View from the Roof 




in in i- f ll1 







The Courtyard December 2006 

Go to www.sau 14.org and scroll to the bottom of the home page for more pictures. 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



Many thanks to all for their hard work 
and patience. In just a few months the new 
addition will be open! 

Sincerely, 

The Epping Building Committee 



Elementary School 

Annual First Day Program 

Epping Elementary School opened on Au- 
gust 25, 2006. Three hundred adults joined 
their children in classes and then took part 
in an orientation session put on by school 
and community organizations such as the 
PTO, the Epping Police and Fire Depart- 
ments, our Title I program and the Harvey 
Mitchell Library. Our school welcomed 
new teachers Susan Carter (Grade 2), Katie 
Crosby (Special Education), Ashley Foster 
(Grade 5), and Lizette Nash (Special Edu- 
cation) as well as a new Dean of Students, 
Mike McKenney. 

2006-07 — A Focus on Reading and 
Writing 

Epping Elementary has made 2006-07 
a year devoted to improving reading and 
writing. The school's Literacy Task Force, a 
group made up of teachers, para-profession- 
als, parents and administrators developed 
a plan to train teachers in more effective 
teaching methods and to increase commu- 
nity and family participation in reading. In 
one program, all teachers of grades K to 3 
students have been meeting with reading 
specialists from Tufts University to learn 
the components of "Readers Workshop" a 
program that increases the amount of time 
students spend on independent reading. All 
teachers have learned to check on reading 
progress through the use of the DRA test- 
ing program, a system that helps teachers 
identify student strengths and weaknesses 
precisely and frequently. Teachers in grades 
4 and 5 have participated in graduate 
courses on literacy that are conducted right 
here at school by the University of New 
Hampshire. The courses, called Learning 
Through Teaching, bring university pro- 
fessors into the school to observe teachers, 
conduct classes and lead groups of staff 
members in small group observations of ef- 




First grade students Erin Killen and Brenna Osgood show off their Matryoshka dolls 
during the EES Artist In Residence program with Traditional Russian Artist Marina 

Nazarova Forbes. 



fective instruction. A third effort is led by 
well-known artist and writer, Beth Olshan- 
sky who is training a group of 12 teachers 
in Picture Writing, a method that incorpo- 
rates art with writing and helps build stu- 
dent vocabulary and writing fluency. 

The school has also reached out to 
parents and families in our effort to pro- 
mote reading and writing. Epping's Title 
I program sponsored a breakfast informa- 
tion session on reading for parents and will 
host a second Pizza and Literacy Night that 
is co-sponsored by NH Public Television's 
education program on reading. Third grade 
teacher Nancy Bernard has also planned 
a special evening program called Readers' 
Theater for parents and children. 

Curriculum Mapping 

As part of its effort to improve student 
achievement, Epping Elementary School 
has begun aligning its curriculum with the 
New Hampshire state grade level expecta- 
tions that were released last year. Teach- 
ers from all grade levels have learned how 
to use the computer program Curriculum 
Mapper to enter existing units of study. 
The Mapper program will enable teachers 



to then analyze both Epping's K-5 curricu- 
lum and the state expectations before mak- 
ing changes in what is taught and when it 
is taught. 

NWEA Testing Implemented 

Epping Elementary also began to use the 
NWEA test in math, reading and writing 
for grades 2-5. This on line test will be 
given at the beginning and ending of this 
school year to provide more immediate 
feedback on how well each student is pro- 
gressing. The advantage of this test is the 
speed of the results. Teachers and adminis- 
trators know within days the results and so 
they can individualize their instruction to 
meet the needs of all students. 

Some examples? Epping Elementary 
started a weekly enrichment program in 
mathematics for students who scored 90% 
or above on the NWEA. In another in- 
stance, low NWEA scores in reading have 
helped us identify students for extra help 
and attention in reading. 

Enrichment Activities 

For the seventh straight year, Epping stu- 
dents are taking part in the Artist in Resi- 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 




Michael Rainford and Ryleigh Holmes play the accordion with Traditional Polish 
Accordion Artist Gary Sredzienski during the EES Artist In Residence Program." 



cost of bus transportation for field trips, 
sponsor special assembly performances and 
lectures for parents. The PTO purchased 
and installed a slide and miniature rock- 
climbing board for the playground. Once 
again PTO volunteers operated the daily 
snack program, held a Halloween Dance 
and put on an ice cream social. The PTO 
also organized a spring fair that was very 
well attended. Thank you, PTO. 

Many thanks to all the dedicated 
people — parents, teachers, custodians, 
aides, food service workers, office stafF, sub- 
stitutes, and volunteers who work for the 
benefit of our students and who make this 
school a wonderful place to learn and grow. 
You are welcome to see this dedicated staff 
working with great kids, please feel free to 
call our school at 679-8018 to arrange a 
visit. 

Mark Vallone 
Principal 



dence program with this year's program 
focusing on Latin American music and art. 
Every K— 5 student will have the opportu- 
nity to work. The Artist in Residence pro- 
gram is funded by the Epping School Dis- 
trict, and money from assorted fund raisers 
conducted during the year. 

This year Epping Elementary School 
is offering after school lessons in Spanish 
and French. After school programs this 
year also include a Homework Club, Study 
Buddies, Leap Frog, Passport Around the 
World, Writing Club, Adventure Club, 
Drama and Yoga. Before school programs 
include Jump Rope Club, Friendship Club, 
Safety Skills and Library. 

Volunteers 

I am once again pleased to report that 
Epping Elementary was recognized as both 
a Blue Ribbon and a Gold School for its vol- 
unteer program. Thanks to parent volunteer 
Abby Constantineau, Guidance Counselor 
Laura Conley, and administrative assistant 
Cheryl MacLeay who recruited and trained 
new volunteers and managed the schedules 
of the many veteran volunteers. Thanks also 
to the hundreds of volunteers who contrib- 
uted so much to our program. 



Epping PTO 

The PTO continues to be a major partner 
in educating the children of Epping El- 
ementary. PTO fund raisers helped pay the 



Middle School 

This summer when our faculty attended 
the Summer Conference of the New Eng- 




Charlie Hardy and John Gagnon try outplaying the accordion during the Artist In 

Residence Program. 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



land League of Middle Schools (NELMS), 
we elected to call ourselves, "A school on 
the move!" and so we are! During this 
school year we are critically reexamining 
ourselves — the program we have in place 
for young adolescent learners — and de- 
ciding which items will move to our new 
middle school facility and which things 
we will pack away and put into storage. 
We are so excited to be preparing for our 
new school, a school specifically designed 
to provide the most effective education to 
the sixth through eighth graders of Epping. 
Thank you for building this school for us. 
We hope you are having as much fun as we 
are watching the structure go up and imag- 
ining what will happen on the inside. It's all 
about the learning! 

We have focused our work to coordi- 
nate with the goals of the Epping School 
Board. The first area is Student Achieve- 
ment. EMS is working to facilitate a col- 
laborative relationship with families to en- 
sure the success of every student. We have 
inaugurated the following to facilitate com- 
munication between home and school: 

• Wednesday Communication Days so 
that parents can know when to expect 
information coming home with 
students in their planners; 

• Good News notes that are mailed to 
parents to share student successes; 

• A page on the Epping School 
District website to provide dynamic 
information to the community; and 

• Principal's coffees which are held 
monthly. 

To continue connecting school with 
family, the EMS PTO has been working 
on behalf of the students and their fami- 
lies. One of its most successful activities 
this year has been a Family Night held 
in connection with the school's celebra- 
tion of Red Ribbon Week. The event was 
held in November and was extremely well 
attended. Another family event is being 
planned. 

Another program to encourage stu- 
dent achievement which has seen revision 
is the student advisory program. All stu- 
dents have an advisor and meet two times 
each week in these small groups. One of the 
purposes of this group is to help students 



design individualized learning plans to bet- 
ter understand themselves as learners and 
to set achievement goals. Another is to take 
on special community services projects and 
to have the opportunity to support one an- 
other in an academic setting. 

Seventh grade students attended 
Nature's Classroom for a week in Octo- 
ber. The students used an outdoor envi- 
ronment to actively engage in learning. 
Our students have experienced learning 
through several field trips including the 
Boston Museum of Science and plays. By 
providing real life learning experiences, we 
are better able to make connections with 
classroom learning. 

Student achievement is currently 
measured by the New England Common 
Education Program (NECAP) where stu- 
dents are tested in the fall. We are awaiting 
the results of this year's testing, but have 
spent significant time analyzing the results 
and are working as part of the School in 
Need of Improvement (SINI) and District 
in Need of Improvement (DINI) plans to 
make certain that our instruction is aligned 
with what is being assessed. 

The second School Board goal ad- 
dresses creating a Respectful School and 
Learning Culture. We have directed sig- 
nificant attention to this goal as a positive 
and respectful school climate contributes 
exponentially to student achievement. 
EMS has continued to focus on our Guid- 
ing Principles which were adopted last 
year. Each month every team selects two 
students who represent their peers in liv- 
ing up to our principles. We hold recog- 
nition assemblies each month to honor 
these students and they are then invited 
to a Principal's Breakfast for additional 
reinforcement. Also honored at these as- 
semblies are students who are randomly 
selected as part of our new "Nice Moves" 
program. Many times our students engage 
in random acts which represent our guid- 
ing principles or they are observed doing 
something positive for one of their peers 
or for a teacher. Teachers then give the stu- 
dents a "ticket" to acknowledge this act. 
At our assemblies we draw tickets from the 
box and students receive any number of 
prizes such as free snacks, ice cream, gift 
certificates, etc. We have received dona- 



tions from various members of the Epping 
community including our own teachers. 
Prizes to date have included such items 
as hair styling supplies, X-box games and 
even a snow board. Donations are wel- 
come and potential donors should contact 
our Dean of Students who has developed 
this program. Middle school students ap- 
preciate being recognized for their positive 
behaviors. 

We have also enjoyed several special 
events during the year. Ed Gerety provided 
one student assembly. His message focused 
on four important traits: appreciation, re- 
spect, kindness and belief. The students 
responded positively to his message. We 
expect to have other programs during the 
year. Another special event was our celebra- 
tion of Red Ribbon Week in late October. 
The focus of this week is to help students 
make important choices regarding drug 
and alcohol use. The 7th and 8th graders 
were able to participate in an activity spon- 
sored by the National Guard. We received 
a letter from the sponsor complimenting 
our students as "one of the most respect- 
ful, upbeat and downright pleasurable stu- 
dent communities that I have had the joy of 
working with!" 

Part of creating a school culture is to 
recognize the contributions of faculty in 
addition to the students. Staff members are 
randomly selected to use the special park- 
ing place in front of the school. Sixth grade 
teachers are randomly selected to have the 
principal cover their duties before school. 
We also acknowledge special contributions 
with an EMS Appreciation Apple. 

Finally, our students have participated 
in the "My Voice" Survey. This survey asks 
students their opinion about their school 
environment and is sponsored by the NH 
Department of Education. We have been 
carefully analyzing the feedback the stu- 
dents have provided and are working to 
make sure the middle school climate is one 
where respect, responsibility and relation- 
ships flourish. 

In order to create a refreshed middle 
school program, the third school board 
goal of Professional Growth has been 
emphasized. The faculty's journey with 
their new administration began with a 
three day summer experience at the Sum- 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



mer NELMS conference referred to above. 
We learned many things about one another 
and made some important decisions to be- 
gin our year. From that point, our profes- 
sional development has had three primary 
initiatives. 

The first focuses on teaching literacy in 
the content areas and is a continuation of 
work begun during the previous year. EMS 
has a literacy team which is helping to fo- 
cus the work. On the early release days, we 
have been working with the NELMS liter- 
acy consultant. Her efforts were a review of 
the two day session teachers had attended 
last year. The consultant also met with the 
Literacy Team to make plans to sustain the 
literacy initiative during the year. From 
that point we have been providing our own 
leadership to this initiative. We have agreed 
upon a rubric to use for writing which par- 
allels those used by the state on NECAP 
writing prompts. We are working to make 
this kind of writing commonplace for our 
students so that they are not surprised 
when they see it on the NECAP tests. The 
benefit to students is that they are receiving 
similar vocabulary and information in all 
of their classes regarding reading and writ- 
ing no matter the content of the material 
being addressed. 

The second initiative concerns assess- 
ment. The NELMS Teacher in Residence 
has spent several days working with the 
four teams during their planning periods 
to discuss the connections with curricu- 
lum and instruction. One of our goals is 
to have a clear and concise understanding 
of our grading system which is standards 
based and descriptive. This is an effort 
which involves taking divergent points of 
view to become agreed-upon middle school 
practice. The work currently is leading to 
an alignment of our grades with NECAPs. 
We are trying to use language such as "pro- 
ficient with distinction, proficient, develop- 
ing proficiency and novice" to align with 
A, B, C and I. 

Finally the faculty is meeting bi- 
monthly for an hour after school. In these 
meetings we have been addressing not only 
some nuts and bolts about our current 
work, but also thinking about and discuss- 
ing a variety of best practices to focus our 
work together as a school. There are several 



concerns about the change process, about 
the initiatives around DINI and SINI as 
well as practical matters around grading, 
progress reports, advisory, technology, etc. 
which are being discussed by the faculty. 
These working meetings have provided fac- 
ulty with the opportunity to discuss impor- 
tant issues across grade levels and content 
areas as we work to refine the program we 
will be taking to the new middle school 
building. We really are working to create "a 
school of our own!" 

The final school board goal addresses 
Curriculum Mapping and we are begin- 
ning to focus our energy in this direction. 
Curriculum mapping helps us articulate 
not only what we teach, but when we teach 
it and is a vehicle to help teachers connect 
learning for their students. We have Grade 
Level Expectations (GLEs) and Grade 
Span Expectations (GSEs) that provide the 
"what students should know and be able 
to do" information for teachers. Our work 
is focusing on literacy — reading and writ- 
ing — and we are working to make certain 
that we find no gaps in our instruction 
which would impact our student's learn- 
ing. Because this work is so intertwined 
with the other goals of the school board, 
our DINI and SINI plans, and simply be- 
cause it's what we do everyday, it is chal- 
lenging to be more specific in describing 
our work! 

In conclusion, I would like to sincerely 
thank the town of Epping for supporting 
the creation of a new middle school! In my 
professional career I have had the opportu- 
nity to work with many schools in many 
different communities and I am enjoying 
this opportunity to work with an outstand- 
ing group of administrators, some terrific 
staff members, some wonderful students 
and caring parents and community mem- 
bers to help create this school to address the 
unique developmental needs of middle level 
students. We really are working to create a 
separate school, a "school of their own!" and 
will look forward to sharing our "school on 
the move!" with you when we open in our 
new building in the fall. Thank you! 

Lyn WardHealy 
Principal 



High School 



As always the year has been filled with 
changes and opportunities. The focus of 
the 2006-2007 school year has been in- 
struction. Our teachers and the adminis- 
trative team have focused on this issue in 
many different ways. We have restructured 
instructional time, worked on academic 
standards, and come together as a faculty 
to create an enriching environment for stu- 
dents. 

Last April Epping High School was 
once again granted its accreditation by the 
NEAS&C. One of the tasks that EHS was 
asked to complete was to develop a mis- 
sion statement that reflected that we were 
now a 9-12 school. Many of you may have 
noticed our new mission statement on our 
website. For those who have not read our 
mission statement it is as follows: 

The Epping High School community 
educates and empowers students 
within a safe environment to 
become Respectful, Involved, and 
Knowledgeable citizens. 

This mission statement represents the 
lens that we are using to frame all of the 
work that we do at EHS. 

Student Achievement 

We began our academic year once again 
with a celebration where students met with 
all of their teachers and had a chance to re- 
new acquaintances. 

This year both grades 9 and 10 are in 
teaching teams. The English, math, science, 
social studies and special education teach- 
ers as well as the guidance counselor form 
a team of caring adults who work with our 
students. These teachers meet daily to align 
curriculum and discuss student progress. 
The meetings allow the teachers to review a 
student's progress from many different per- 
spectives. The 10th grade team is offering 
honors challenges in the four core subjects. 
These honors challenges allow students to 
stretch themselves academically while of- 
fering the student the chance to earn an 
honors designation on their transcripts. 
Our freshman and sophomore teams moni- 
tor all students' progress very closely and 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



strive to communicate with patents. The 
teams send home tegulat ptogtess reports 
so that students and patents always know 
where they stand academically. 

In the uppei grades we have expanded 
our Advanced Placement offering to include 
an 11th grade English class. This addition 
increases the AP classes offered at EHS to 
six. Next yeat we are hoping to add an AP 
Chemistry course. 

Not only are we expanding course of- 
ferings to students, we are also measuring 
progress through the use of standardized 
exams. We once again tested out grade 9 
and 10 students using a computer based 
assessment, the Northwest Evaluation As- 
sociation's Measures of Academic Progress. 
The test results have given teachers and 
students information about skills and con- 
cepts that individual students have learned 
and will allow teachers to adjust instruc- 
tion. This year's junior class also performed 
quite well on the NHIEAP test last spring, 
achieving adequate yeaily progress on all 
standaids. 

While we have emphasized academic 
challenges and measuring student progress, 
we are also providing support to students so 
that they can strengthen their basic skills. 
We have added tutorial classes in English 
and math at the 9th and 10th grade lev- 
els. These classes give students additional 
time in these subject areas to work on con- 
cept acquisition. We are also offering aftet 
school tutoring for any student who needs 
extra help in English, math, social studies 
or science. 

While we continue to stress that stu- 
dents need to gather credits in order to 
graduate, we also want students to learn 
to be responsible by facing natural conse- 
quences. We expect students to pass theit 
classes. If students do not pass theit classes 
the credit must be made up at a small cost 
to the student. It is our belief that the citi- 
zens of Epping should pay for the first time 
a student takes a class, not the second. This 
is not to be a punishment for students but 
rathei a natutal consequence of not passing 
a class. In order to help students in recov- 
ering credits, we have continued our credit 
recovery portion of our CARE program 
where students can earn credit after school 
for a nominal fee. 



Implementation of these programs, ex- 
panded course offerings and standardized 
tests is getting to the root of anothei of the 
key concepts of our mission statement and 
that is being knowledgeable. It is our hope 
that by emphasizing academics while pro- 
viding support for the acquisition of skills 
we will be fostering the development of 
more knowledgeable students. 

Respectful School and Learning 
Culture 

This yeat we have moved to a block sched- 
ule, allowing the students and faculty to fo- 
cus on fewet classes at one time. The longer 
periods of instruction also allow a concept 
or idea to be introduced and worked with 
all in the same instructional block. The 
new schedule gives students the opportuni- 
ty to have a short break at the beginning of 
the day (aftet the first block of instruction) 
which provides time to get something to eat 
and be energized for the rest of the morn- 
ing. Juniors and seniors have also been al- 
lowed to earn the pt ivilege of signing out 
of school during study halls. In order for 
juniors and seniors to earn theit privileges, 
they must maintain a "C" in each of their 
courses. 

In keeping with a focus on instruction, 
the faculty has wot ked along with their stu- 
dents to create Full Value Contracts (FVC). 
FVC's are, according to the Critical Skills 
Program, a social contract that helps to cre- 
ate a safe learning environment for all mem- 
bers of a classroom community. It also pro- 
vides a structure within which behavioral 
and academic expectations are established. 
This class contract models a respectful en- 
vironment fot students by giving guidelines 
for interactions and allowing a safe forum 
for students to discuss differences of opin- 
ions. The FVC is a way in which we are 
using our mission statement to guide our 
practice, modeling a respectful manner in 
which to inteiact with others. 

Another key attribute that makes up 
our mission statement is involvement. We 
at EHS have very active clubs, organiza- 
tions and sport teams that offer our stu- 
dents the opportunity to become involved 
in high school. There is an organization 
or sport for everyone. We have clubs that 
are academically focused, community ser- 



vice oriented and others geared to special 
talents/interests. We at EHS are proud that 
we have fifteen different clubs and organi- 
zations along with student government that 
offer students the chance to expand their 
learning and personal growth beyond the 
classroom. 

On the athletic field our students once 
again represented out community with 
style and grace. The basketball season al- 
lowed our student to showcase their skills. 
The boy's varsity team went 9-10 and lost in 
the preliminary round of the state playoffs. 
The girl's varsity team went 17-3 and lost in 
the quarterfinal round of the state tourna- 
ment. Last spring our baseball and Softball 
teams were competitive in their class. This 
year we held the second annual homecom- 
ing celebration with home games in all var- 
sity sports, a dance and an outdoot concert. 
Our football team, in its third season as an 
NHIAA varsity level sport, went 1-8. The 
football team and the coaching staff also 
received the New Hampshire Football Of- 
ficials Association's Sportsmanship banner 
which will hang in our new gym next yeat. 
The volleyball team had an enetgizing sea- 
son with many tough fought matches with 
a 6-11 record. This year they made it to the 
Division 3 preliminary round of the state 
tournament. On the soccer field EHS once 
again experienced much success with both 
the Girl's and Boy's varsity teams making it 
to the playoffs. The Boys team for the first 
time ever made it to the second round in 
the playoff. Mr. McDermott was elected by 
his peers as the Class M Coach of the year. 
The Girl's Varsity team made it to the fi- 
nal four in the state tournament. This yeat 
we are sponsoring our first swim team with 
one young man representing Epping at a 
variety of swim meets. We have, for the fitst 
time, an indoor track team with 6 students 
representing Epping. 

Professional Growth 

EHS is lucky to have a dedicated and hard 
working faculty and staff. This summer 
85% of our teaching faculty attended a 
week long institute to learn about the Criti- 
cal Skills Model. The remaining 15% have 
received training on this model throughout 
the first quarter of the school year. As a 
result of the work accomplished this sum- 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



mer, Epping High School has embraced the 
Critical Skills teaching model as a vehicle 
to work together to improve instruction. 
The short definition of this model is: 

....a classroom dynamic that guides 
the thoughtful design of learning 
experiences for students. At a simple 
level, it is a set of tools and strategies 
for being purposeful in the process of 
engaging students in their learning 
making the class run more smoothly, 
addressing state and local learning goals, 
and focusing on quality work. In other 
words, Critical Skills is understanding 
that in order to develop into 
independent thinkers and responsible 
citizens, students need to practice being 
independent and responsible in the 
relatively safe environment of school. 

One of the techniques that teachers 
have implemented are learning opportuni- 
ties we call "challenges" that ask for stu- 
dents to problem solve. These challenges, 
since students need to understand the 
content and also to apply what they have 
learned, will lead to a greater understand- 
ing of the selected subject matter. 

The faculty and staff have also been 
developing various ways of working to- 
gether to raise the bar on the delivery of 
instruction. The teachers have begun to 
develop a rubric describing quality class- 
rooms. This rubric will be used by the 
teachers to help them to continue to grow 
professionally and to define the aspects of 
an exemplary class. The teachers have also 
been conducting peer to peer observations 
to give feedback and viewing how other 
teachers deal with various instructional 
techniques. 

Curriculum Mapping 

While focusing on instruction we have 
not lost sight of our curriculum goals. This 
year the faculty will be examining the New 
Hampshire Department of Education's 
Grade Span Expectations. These grade 
spans more specifically direct the revision 
of the curriculum. Epping High School has 
joined with ten other seacoast high schools 
to develop competencies for all high school 
classes. 



Thank You 

As always we strive to serve our students 
and community. Please visit our new web- 
site for the latest information about what 
is happening in the school www.saul4.org/ 
EHS. As always feel free to call to discuss 
any issue or area of concern. Epping High 
School is a great place to be. Thank you for 
your continued support. 

Dixie Bacallao Tremblay 
Principal 



Director of Special 
Services 

The opening of the 2006 school year brings 
to the Epping Special Education depart- 
ment a time of reflection and self-assess- 
ment. This year we are preparing for an on- 
site evaluation from the New Hampshire 
Department of Education Special Educa- 
tion Program Approval and Improvement 
Process. This is part of a three year cycle 
that supports improved educational results 
for all children, youth, and their families 
by "Cultivating a Culture of Collective Re- 
sponsibility". 

This evaluation process allows the 
school district, through the filters of No 
Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Indi- 
viduals with Disabilities Improvement Act 
(IDEA 2004), to look at students with dis- 
abilities to increase their ability to access 
the general curriculum, to support teach- 
ers as they successfully utilize assessments 
to guide instruction and to support posi- 
tive transitions from grade level to grade 
level. 

Special Education staff members, in 
collaboration with their peers, have been 
working to develop core principles that 
support effectively teaching all children. 
Teachers have been using assessment for 
screening, diagnostic analysis, and for 
monitoring student progress. As a result of 
these assessments, research based instruc- 
tion is adjusted to meet the needs of all 
students. 

As of December 2006, the school 
district provided special education ser- 
vices to 175 identified students. Services 



include occupational therapy, speech & 
language services, behavioral consultation 
with our school psychologist, adventure 
base counseling, remedial instruction in 
specialized math, reading and written lan- 
guage programs from our special educa- 
tion teachers, and post-secondary support 
from our School to Career counselor. We 
provide physical therapy services through 
a certified contracted employee. Itinerant 
teachers, such as teachers for the hearing 
and visually impaired, are contracted as 
needed. 

All special education staff members 
from paraprofessionals to special educa- 
tion teachers are deeply involved in quality, 
comprehensive on-site professional develop- 
ment that is supported by our district ini- 
tiatives with Tufts, NELMS, Antioch, and 
UNH. These opportunities for professional 
development allow the adults to model our 
commitment to learning as they provide in- 
struction and support. 

As we complete the Department of 
Education evaluation process this year it 
will be with a positive attitude that fosters 
ongoing efforts to improve instructional 
outcomes for students with disabilities. We 
will keep in mind that our efforts are not an 
isolated or a one year only event, but rather 
a comprehensive process that supports stu- 
dents, parents, and community from pre- 
school to high school. 

I wish to express a heartfelt thanks to 
our paraprofessionals, teachers, staff, vol- 
unteers, school board members, and par- 
ents for their support and commitment to 
our students. As I watch the new middle 
school grow I am reminded once again of 
the wonderful place I have been given the 
opportunity to work. Thank you for your 
continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Catherine Zylinski 
Director of Special Services 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



2006 Ballot Results 



ABSENTEE 

OFFICIAL BALLOT 

ANNUAL SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTION 

EPPING, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MARCH 14, 2006 



■") 



School District Clerk v/ 



ctk 



INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS 

A. TO VOTE, completely fill in the OVAL to the RIGHT of your choice (s) like this: m 
E. Foiiow directions as to the number of candidates to be marked for each office, 
fo voie tor a person whose name is not printed on the ballot, write the candidate's name on 
the line provided and completely fill in the OVAL. 



! SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER 



'voie tor not 
more than 1 



3 AMEU TiBBETTS 



.__!© 



(Write-in) 




SCHOOL WARRANTS 



^rticie < Shall the Epping School District accept the previsions of RSA 194-C providing for the withdrawal of 
ihd Epping School District from Scnooi Aomintstrative Una No. 14 involving the school disincis of Chester, 
Epping ana Fremont. In accordance with The provisions of the Epping SAU Withdrawal Study Committee's pro- 
posed plan to form a single Epping SAU receiving 100% SAU services at the same cost as remaining in the pres- 
ent SAU and receiving only 50% of the SAU services'-' (3/5 vote required) [Recommended by the Epping 
School 3oard Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee] 



■m 

YES 
NO 



Article 2. Snail the Epping School District raise and appropriate as an operating budget, not including appro- 
priations by special warrant articles and other appropriations voted separately, the amounts set forth on the 
budget posted with the warrant or as amended by vote of the first session, for the purposes set forth therein, 
totaling 11 4, 1 03,140V Should this article be defeated, the default budget shall be $14,094,500. which is the same 
as last year, w<th certain adjustments required by previous action of the Epping School District or by law; or the 
governing body may hold one special meeting, in accordance with RSA 40:13. X and XVI, to take up the issue 
of a ravisea operating budget only. (Majority vote required) [The Epping School Board Recommends 
$14,103,140 The Epping Budget Committee Recommends $14,103,140] 



Gfl4> 

YES 
NO 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



2007-2008 School District Budget 



MS-27 



SCHOOL BUDGET FORM 

BUDGET FORM FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED 
THE PROVISIONS OF RSA 32:14 THROUGH 32:24 

OF: EPPING, NH 

Appropriations and Estimates of Revenue for the Fiscal Year From July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 

IMPORTANT: 



Please read RSA 32:5 applicable to all municipalities. 



1 .Use this form to list ALL APPROPRIATIONS in the appropriate recommended and not recommended area. 
This means the operating budget and all special and individual warrant articles must be posted. 

2. Hold at least one public hearing on this budget. 

3. When completed, a copy of the budget must be posted with the warrant. Another copy must be placed on file 
with the school clerk, and a copy sent to the Department of Revenue Administration at the address below. 



This form was posted with the warrant on (Date): y613 /&y 




&jh_ 



CJ 




1 



T 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 
Please sign in ink. 








THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE SCHOOL WARRANT 



FOR DRA USE ONLY 



NH DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 
MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION 
P.O. BOX 487, CONCORD, NH 03302-0487 
(603)271-3397 



MS-27 
Rev. 08/05 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 




2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



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2006 Annual Report 



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2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



MS-27 



Budget - School District of EPPING FY 2008 
3 4 



Acct.# 


SOURCE OF REVENUE 


WARR. 

ART.# 


Actual Revenues 
Prior Year 


Revised Revenues 
Current Year 


Estimated 
Revenues 

ENSUING FISCAL YEAR 




REVENUE FROM LOCAL SOURCES 




xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


1300-1349 


Tuition 


4 


$1,025,803 


$595,000 


$348,266 


1400-1449 


Transportation Fees 


4 








1500-1599 


Earnings on Investments 


4 


$28,557 


$2,700 


$5,000 


1600-1699 


Food Service Sales 


4 


$198,558 


$248,876 


$280,376 


1700-1799 


Student Activities 


4 


$19,250 


$20,000 


$20,000 


1800-1899 


Community Services Activities 


4 








1900-1999 


Other Local Sources 


4 


$86,592 


$198,000 


$98,000 
















REVENUE FROM STATE SOURCES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3210 


School Building Aid 


4 


$37,274 


$188,481 


$193,894 


3220 


Kindergarten Aid 


4 








3230 


Catastrophic Aid 


4 


$74,566 


$43,000 


$43,000 


3240-3249 


Vocational Aid 


4 


$15,780 


$10,000 


$10,000 


3250 


Adult Education 


4 








3260 


Child Nutrition 


4 


$4,358 


$4,130 


$4,130 


3270 


Driver Education 


4 


$3,450 


$7,500 


$7,500 


3290-3299 


Other State Sources 


4 


$26,111 




















REVENUE FROM FEDERAL SOURCES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


4100-4539 


Federal Program Grants 


4 








4540 


Vocational Education 


4 








4550 


Adult Education 


4 








4560 


Child Nutrition 


4 


$127,562 


$127,500 


$127,500 


4570 


Disabilities Programs 


4 








4580 


Medicaid Distribution 


4 


$25,860 


$25,000 


$25,000 


4590-4999 


Other Federal Sources (except 4810) 


4 








4810 


Federal Forest Reserve 


4 






















OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


5110-5139 


Sale of Bonds or Notes 


4 








5221 


Transfer from Food Service-Spec.Rev.Fund 


4 








5222 


Transfer from Other Special Revenue Funds 


4 








5230 


Transfer from Capital Project Funds 


4 


$155,000 


$83,298 


$0 


5251 


Transfer from Capital Reserve Funds 


4 









MS-27 
Rev. 08/05 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



MS-27 



Budget - School District of EPPING FY 2008 
3 4 













Estimated 






WARR. 


Actual Revenues 


Revised Revenues 


Revenues 


Acct# 


SOURCE OF REVENUE 


ART.# 


Prior Year 


Current Year 


ENSUING FISCAL YEAR 





OTHER FINANCING SOURCES CONT. 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


5252 


Transfer from Expendable Trust Funds 










5253 


Transfer from Non-Expendable Trust Funds 










5300-5699 


Other Financing Sources 


































5140 


This Section for Calculation of RAM's 
(Reimbursement Anticipation Notes) Per RSA 
198:20-D for Catastrophic Aid Borrowing 
RAN, Revenue This FY less 
RAN, Revenue Last FY 










=NETRAN 




Supplemental Appropriation (Contra) 










Voted From Fund Balance 


3 






$400,000 


Fund Balance to Reduce Taxes 


4 


$192,071 


$201,760 


$100,000 


Total Estimated Revenue & Credits 




$2,020,792 


$1,755,245 


$1,662,666 



•BUDGET SUMMARY** 





Currant Year 
Adopted Budget 


School Board's 
Recommended Budget 


Budget Committee's 
Recommended Budget 


SUBTOTAL 1 Appropriations Recommended (from page 3) 


$14,103,140 


$14,854,624 


$14,854,624 


SUBTOTAL 2 Special Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 4) 


$0 


$400,000 


$400,000 


SUBTOTAL 3 "Individual" Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 4) 




$279,589 


$279,589 


TOTAL Appropriations Recommended 


$14,103,140 


$15,534,213 


$15,534,213 


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues & Credits (from above) 


$1,755,245 


$1,662,666 


$1,662,666 


Less: Amount of Statewide Enhanced Education Tax/Grant 


$4,393,946 


$4,161,285 


$4,161,285 


Estimated Amount of Local Taxes to be Raised For Education 


$7,953,949 


$9,710,262 


$9,710,262 



Maximum Allowable Increase to Budget Committee's Recommended Budget per RSA 32:18: $1,385,358 
(See Supplemental Schedule With 10% Calculation) 



MS-27 
Rev. 08/05 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



BUDGET COMMITTEE SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULE 

(For Calculating 10% Maximum Increase) 

(RSA 32:18, 19, & 32:21) 

VERSION #2: Use if you have Collective Bargaining Cost Items 



LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL UNIT: Epping School District 

Col. A 



FISCAL YEAR END 2008 





RECOMMENDED 
AMOUNT 




1. Total RECOMMENDED by Budget 
Committee (see budget MS7, 27,or 37) 


$14,854,624 




LESS EXCLUSIONS: 
2. Principal: Long-Term Bonds & Notes 


$460,000 




3. Interest: Long-Term Bonds & Notes 


$541,041 




4. Capital Outlays Funded From Long- 
Term Bonds & Notes per RSA 33:8 & 
33:7-b 






5. Mandatory Assessments 






I 6. TOTAL EXCLUSIONS (Sum of rows 
2-5) 


< $1,001 ,041 > 




7. Amount recommended less 
recommended exclusion amounts (Line 1 
less Line 6) 


$13,853,583 




8. Line 7 times 10% 


$1,385,358 


Col. C 


9. Maximum allowable appropriation prior 
to vote (Line 1 + 8} 


$16,239,982 


Col. B (Col. B-A) 


10. Collective Bargaining Cost Items, 
RSA 32:19 & 273-A1 , IV, (Complete 
Col. A prior to meeting & Col. B and Col. 
| C at meeting) 


Cost items recommended 

$279,589 


Cost items voted 


Amt. voted above 
recommended 



MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE APPROPRIATIONS VOTED 
At meeting, add Line 9 + Column C. 



Line 8 plus any not recommended collective bargaining cost items or increases to cost 
items voted is the maximum allowable increase to budget committee's recommended 
budget. Please enter this amount on the bottom of the posted budget form, MS7, 27, or 37. 

Please attach a copy of this completed supplemental schedule to the back of the budget form. 



Epping School District 2006 Annual Report 

DEFAULT BUDGET OF THE SCHOOL 

OF: EPPING, NH 



Fiscal Year From July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 



RSA 40:13, IX (b) "Default budget" as used in this subdivision means the amount of the same 
appropriations as contained in the operating budget authorized for the previous year, reduced and 
increased, as the case may be, by debt service, contracts, and other obligations previously incurred 
or mandated by law, and reduced by one-time expenditures contained in the operating budget. For 
the purposes of this paragraph, one-time expenditures shall be appropriations not likely to recur in 
the succeeding budget, as determined by the governing body, unless the provisions of RSA 40:14-b 
are adopted, of the local political subdivision. 



1 . Use this form to list the default budget calculation in the appropriate columns. 

2. Post this form or any amended version with proposed operating budget (MS-26 or MS-27) and the warrant. 

3. Per RSA 40:13, XI, (a), the default budget shall be disclosed at the first budget hearing. 



SCHOOL BOARD 
or 

Budget Committee if RSA 40:14-b is adopted 



) 





( ^-Jri)^f = 



NH DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 

MUNICIPAL FINANCE BUREAU 

P.O. BOX 487, CONCORD, NH 03302-0487 

(603)271-3397 



07/04 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



Default Budget - School District of EPPING FY 2008 
3 4 



Acct.# 


PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 
(RSA32:3,V) 


Prior Year 

Adopted 

Operating Budget 


Reductions & 
Increases 


Minus 

1-Time 

Appropriations 


DEFAULT BUDGET 




INSTRUCTION (1000-1999) 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


1100-1199 


Regular Programs 


4,163,255 


-64,041 




4,099,214 


1200-1299 


Special Programs 


1,992,873 


36,408 




2,029,281 


1300-1399 


Vocational Programs 


174,930 


34,470 




209,400 


1400-1499 


Other Programs 


250,109 







250,109 


1500-1599 


Non-Public Programs 










1600-1899 


Adult & Community Programs 












SUPPORT SERVICES (2000-2999) 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


2000-2199 


Student Support Services 


971,941 


-6,397 




965,544 


2200-2299 


Instructional Staff Services 


596,174 


39,186 




635,360 




General Administration 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


2310 840 


School Board Contingency 










2310-2319 


Other School Board 


80,813 


8,485 




89,298 




Executive Administration 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


2320-310 


SAU Management Services 


305,955 


-3,691 




302,264 


2320-2399 


All Other Administration 


151,993 


4,181 




156,174 


2400-2499 


School Administration Service 


731,740 


79,189 




810,929 


2500-2599 


Business 










2600-2699 


Operation & Maintenance of Plant 


841,769 


113,224 




954,993 


2700-2799 


Student Transportation 


477,811 


83,883 




561,694 


2800-2999 


Support Service Central & Other 


1,954,432 


386,046 




2,340,478 


3000-3999 


NON-INSTRUCTIONAL 
SERVICES 










4000-4999 


FACILITIES ACQUISITIONS 
& CONSTRUCTION 


1 







1 




OTHER OUTLAYS (5000-5999) 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


5110 


Debt Service - Principal 


447,350 


12,650 




460,000 


5120 


Debt Service - Interest 


561,488 


-20,447 




541,041 




FUND TRANSFERS 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


5220-5221 


To Food Service 


400,506 







400,506 


5222-5229 


To Other Special Revenue 










5230-5239 


To Capital Projects 










5251 


To Capital Reserves 










5252 


To Expendable Trust 











Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



Default Budget - School District of EPPING FY 2008 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Acct.# 


PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 
(RSA 32:3,V) 


Prior Year 

Adopted 

Operating Budget 


Reductions & 
Increases 


Minus 
1-Time 

Appropriations 


DEFAULT BUDGET 




FUND TRANSFERS 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


5253 


To Non-Expendable Trusts 










5254 


To Agency Funds 










5300-5399 


Intergovernmental Agency Alloc. 












SUPPLEMENTAL 












DEFICIT 












SUBTOTAL 1 


14,103,140 


703,146 





14,806,286 



Please use the box below to explain increases or reductions in columns 4 & 5. 



Acct# 


Explanation for Increases 


Acct# 


Explanation for Reductions 


1200 


CURRENT STAFF OVER BUDGET 


1100 


CURRENT STAFF BELOW BUDGET 


1300 


INCREASE IN TUITION IN 2007-2008 


2000-2199 


CURRENT STAFF BELOW BUDGET 


2200-2999 


CURRENT YEAR STAFF OVER BUDGET 


2320 


STAFF REORGANIZATION 


2310 


LEGAL FEES 






2400 


CBA SALARY INCREASES & STAFF REORGANIZATION 






2600 


CONTRACTURAL & SAFETY-UTILITIES/INSURANCE 






2700 


TRANSPORTATION CONTRACTURAL 






2900 


BENEFITS CONTRACTURAL 























2006 Annual Report Epping School District 

2007-2008 Warrant Article Information 

WARRANT ARTICLE 1 

TEACHERS' COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT 



1. Decreases the district contribution to teacher health premiums in all three health plans. 

2. Reduces future health insurance cost by forming a health benefit committee to study various 
health care options and make recommendations by June 2008 for future cost savings. 

3. Adjusts the teacher salary schedule to enable the district to be more competitive in the hiring of 
new, less experienced teachers in anticipation of qualified teacher shortages. 

4. Keeps the district competitive in attracting and retaining quality teachers by maintaining state 
and regional average teacher compensation. 

5. Offers a limited number of teachers to retire early meeting the teacher's need as well as saving 
the district money in replacement salary costs. 

6. Compensates teachers for teaching extra courses and performing extra duties as team leaders 
and program coordinators enabling the district to provide course offerings with existing staff 
and to improve student program for less cost. 

7. Redefines professional development time, aligns funding to district needs and the revised state 
public school standards, and focuses on improved student learning supported by data. 

8. Provides flexibility in the school calendar to offer student instruction by the number of days or 
hours per the revised state public school standards and in anticipation of changing future needs. 

9. Adds one more day to the teacher work year providing an additional teacher training day for 
improved teaching and learning. 

10. Further defines and focuses teacher evaluation on improved teaching and learning per best 
educational practice. 

11. Provides a three-year agreement focusing teachers and the district on school improvement. 



SCHOOL YEAR COST TAX IMPACT 

2007-2008 $279,589 $0.45 

2008-2009 $334,052 $0.54 

2009-2010 $339,628 $0.54 



WARRANT ARTICLE 2 

SPECIAL MEETING D7 WARRANT ARTICLE 1 IS DEFEATED 



1 . In the event that Warrant Article 1 is defeated, Warrant Article 2 permits the district to 
renegotiate with the teachers' union and present cost items to the voters. 

2. Continues the district's intent to negotiate in good faith with the teachers' union. 

3. Tax impact is $0.00. 



Epping School District 2006 Annual Report 



WARRANT ARTICLE 3 

USE OF BOND INTEREST TO OFFSET HVAC COSTS INCURRED 



Recognizing that our school buildings are used all year round, the decision was made to design the new 
addition with central air conditioning as an integral part of the heating/ventilation system. 

When the middle school addition was approved by the voters, the district agreed to apply $238,238 of 
interest earnings from the project to offset the bond cost, and this has been done. The district has been able 
to generate additional bond interest revenue of approximately $400,000 which, with approval, we would 
like to apply against the unanticipated expense of the air conditioning. 

1. The cost of adding air conditioning at a later date is significantly more than incorporating it into the 
original design. 

2. Air quality regulations may soon require central air in school facilities. 

3. Many special programs are mandated during the summer months and students need to have an 
appropriate climate to learn. 

4. The middle and high school buildings are used throughout the summer for summer school and teacher 
training. 

5. The town recreational department uses the middle and high school buildings for various programs 

throughout the summer. 



NOTE: 

We originally anticipated that we might be able to fund additional HVAC costs from the contingency fund, 
but unsuitable soil conditions, unanticipated requirements from the state Department of Environmental 
Services, and mandated upgrades in the existing school to the fire alarm system have depleted a significant 
portion of the contingency. 



ADDITIONAL TAX IMPACT $0.00 



2006 Annual Report Epping School District 

WARRANT ARTICLE 4 

GENERAL FUND OPERATING BUDGET 2007-2008 

1. Maintains school program. 

2. Implements changes necessary to comply with state and federal requirements for DINI (District in 
Need of Improvement) and No Child Left Behind. 

3. Meets the revised state public school standards. 

3. Provides for increased utilities, supplies and personnel needed to open the new middle 
school addition and high school gymnasium. 

NOTE: 



The district has worked hard to maintain educational standards with as little tax impact as possible; however, increases in 
health and retirement rates, special education mandates, data management and professional development expenses related 
to DINI (District in Need of Improvement) requirements, setup costs associated with opening the new facility, increases 
in vocational tuition, and ongoing escalation of fuel & electricity costs have collectively placed a significant strain on 
available resources. The district has tried to minimis e cost increases by reorganizing existing resources so as to offset 
new expense. This year we have also experienced a significant decline in revenue due to a decrease in State aid and the 
continued decrease in tuition revenue as Fremont students transition out of Epping. 

ESTIMATED TAX IMPACT 
Expenditure Increases 

Health Insurance & Retirement 

New Facility 

Special Education 

District in Need of Improvement 

Technology 

Other Programs 

Vocational Education 

Legal Fees 

Reductions in Other Areas 

Subtotal Expense 



Revenue Decreases 

State Tax and Education Grant 

Tuition 

Fund Balance 

Impact Fees 

Capital Project Transfer 

All Other Revenue 

Subtotal Revenue 



Amount 


Impact 


$352,814 


$0.56 


$226,214 


$0.36 


$111,740 


$0.18 


$89,622 


$0.14 


$49,270 


$0.08 


$34,981 


$0.06 


$17,470 


$0.03 


$9,000 


$0.01 


r$139.626> 


($0.22) 


$751,485 


$1.20 


Amount 


Impact 


($232,661) 


($0.37) 


($245,565) 


($0.39) 


($101,760) 


($0.16) 


($100,000) 


($0.16) 


($83,298) 


($0.13) 


$38,044 


$0.06 


r$725.240^ 


$1.16 



Total Estimated Tax Impact $1.476,725 $2.36 

Estimated Tax Impact of Default $2.28 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



Deliberative Session Minutes 



February 8, 2007 

Call to Order: Due to the absence of 
School Moderator Bob Goodrich, Mr. Jim 
Rogier was asked to govern the Deliberative 
Session for the Epping School District. 

Moderator Rogier called meeting to 
order at 7:12 p.m. 

Budget Committee member Brenda 
McCartney introduced the budget com- 
mittee members in attendance. They were 
Chairperson Jim McGeough, Liz Conrad, 
Amy Randall, Marc Nickerson, Michael 
King, Michelle Cromarty, Jeff Harris, Paul 
Spidle and School Board representative Jeff 
Leduc. 

School Board Chairperson Sue Kim- 
ball introduced the School Board members 
and administrators in attendance. They 
were Mr. Robert Ciandella (school legal 
counsel), Superintendent Barbara Munsey, 
Business Manager Martha Williamson, 
Scott Booth, Pam Tibbetts, Bob Lonek, 
Jeff Leduc and School District Clerk 
Robin O'Day. She also introduced each of 
the principals: Mark Vallone, elementary 
school; Lyn Ward Healy, middle school; 
Dixie Tremblay, high school and Gary 
Tiron, Director of Curriculum. 

School Board Chairperson Kimball 
thanked the audience for coming and 
those at home who were watching on the 
EPTV channel. She thanked Mr. Rogier 
for filling in as Moderator and the EPTV 
crew for their continued support in tap- 
ing school board meetings throughout the 
school year. Chairperson Kimball spoke 
about the current Middle School building 
project and the ongoing process of getting 
the building completed and ready for the 
2007-2008 school year. She also recog- 
nized the efforts of the Building Commit- 
tee. It was announced that there will be a 
video of the building project available on 
EPTV in the near future and that interest- 
ed parties can visit the SAU 14 website and 
view the building project slide show that is 
available. Chairperson Kimball concluded 
her opening statement by stating that the 
building project is on schedule and on bud- 
get and thanked all staff members for their 



dedication toward educating the students 
of Epping. 

Moderator Rogier read the rules of the 
meeting. He explained the purpose of the 
Deliberative Session and the process of vot- 
ing for amendments. 

Article 1: To see if the Epping School 
District will vote to approve the cost item 
included in the collective bargaining agree- 
ment reached between the Epping School 
Board and the Epping Education Associa- 
tion which calls for the following increases 
in salaries and benefits at the current staff- 
ing levels: 

Year Estimated Increase 

2007-08 $279,589 

2008-09 $334,052 

2009-10 $339,628 

And further to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $279,589 for the upcoming fiscal 
year, such sum representing the additional 
costs attributable to the increase in sala- 
ries and benefits over those of the appro- 
priation at current staffing levels paid in 
the prior fiscal year. The school board and 
the budget committee recommend this 
appropriation. 

Recommended by the Epping School Board 
Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee 

Member Kimball made a Motion to 
accept the article as written. Seconded by 
Member LeDuc. 

Member Lonek spoke on behalf of Ar- 
ticle 1. Please refer to page 3 of the School 
Board Handout, which highlights the de- 
tails of the Teachers' Collective Bargaining 
Agreement. Mr. Lonek reported that the 
agreement will save the district $63,000 
in health insurance costs and will enable 
the district to form a committee to review 
health insurance plans and recommend fu- 
ture cost savings. The agreement is for three 
years and the first year's cost is $2,000 
more than the last year making it in line 



with previous proposal costs. 

Mr. Paul Spidle stated that the total 
cost impact at the end of the 3-year pro- 
posed contract in its entirety would be ap- 
proximately 1.3 million dollars to the tax- 
payers of Epping. After calculations by the 
Business Manager that figure was proven to 
be incorrect and that the total tax impact 
for the proposed contract in its entirety 
would be approximately $1.8 million dol- 
lars. There was some discussion regarding 
how the warrant articles are written and 
Superintendent Munsey stated that there is 
legal wording that must be used and this 
wording is mandated by the Department of 
Education. 

Mr. Kim Sullivan wanted to know 
what the percentage increase break- 
down was for the 3 year proposed con- 
tract. He also wanted to know why there 
were blanked out areas on the district's 
handouts. Mr. LeDuc explained that at 
3:07 p.m. this afternoon the SAU Office 
received a letter from the Epping Residents 
for Principled Government. As a result of 
this letter a word was removed from the 
handouts. Mr. LeDuc proceeded to read 
the letter. Superintendent Munsey stated 
that the first year would be a 2.5% cost 
of living raise and then a 3.0%-3.5% step 
increase for those that qualify for step in- 
creases, second year would be 4.0% cost of 
living raise and 3.0%-3.5% step increase, 
and third year a 4.0% cost of living raise 
plus 3.0%-3.5% step increase. It was stat- 
ed that there are approximately 50 teach- 
ers out of 100 that will not be receiving 
step increases with this proposed 3 year 
contract. It was stated that the goal of the 
Epping School District is to stay competi- 
tive with the state averages for teachers' 
salaries. Currently Epping is ranked 106 
out of 160 schools in regards to teachers' 
salaries with a starting salary of $1,099 
less than state average for the 2005-2006 
school year. 

Discussion on Article 1 was closed. Ar- 
ticle 1 will appear on ballot as written. 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



Article 2: Shall the Epping School Dis- 
trict, if article 1 is defeated, authorize the 
governing body to call one special meeting, 
at its option, to address article 1 cost items 
only? 

Recommended by the Epping School Board 

Motion by Chairperson Kimball to 
accept Article 2 as written. Seconded by 
Member LeDuc. 

Member Lonek spoke on behalf of Ar- 
ticle 2. See explanation of Article 2 on page 
3 of the School Board Handout. 

There was no discussion on Article 2. 
Article 2 will appear on ballot as written. 

Article 3: To see if the school district will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$400,000 for the purpose of offsetting ad- 
ditional HVAC costs incurred in the middle 
school addition project and authorize the 
use of that amount from the June 30 fund 
balance for this purpose. (This amount is 
available due to additional interest earned 
on bond proceeds from the middle school 
addition project transferred to the general 
fund on or before June 30). 

Recommended by the Epping School Board 
Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee 

Chairperson Kimball made a Motion 
to accept Article 3 as written. It was sec- 
onded by Member Booth. 

Member Booth spoke on behalf of 
Article 3. See page 4 of the School Board 
handout for explanation of Article 3. 

Mr. Kim Sullivan asked what the bor- 
rowing interest rate was. Superintendent 
Munsey explained that the bond was bor- 
rowed at a rate of 4.13% and the district is 
receiving accrued interest at 5.14%. There 
was a total of $640,000 made in interest. 
There was $240,000 turned back to the 
general fund and there is an additional 
$400,000 that the School Board is asking 
to use for HVAC in the new middle school 
addition. There is no tax impact from this 
warrant article. Mr. Sullivan made a Mo- 
tion to amend Article 3 from $400,000 to 
$100,000. Seconded by Ron LaChance. 

Mr. King stated that since there is no 
impact on the tax rate you (the Epping 



voters) should not cheapen the equipment 
that would be used because you cheapen 
the building project and the value of the 
HVAC system that is installed. Superin- 
tendent Munsey explained that during 
the course of construction the building 
committee ran into some problems with a 
stump dump, fire alarm issues, and an en- 
dangered turtle habitat that had to be paid 
for from the projects' contingency funds at 
an unanticipated cost of $220,000. 

Liz Conrad explained to the audience 
that "no tax impact" does not mean "no 
cost". There is always a cost associated with 
money articles that are voted on by the vot- 
ers. She feels that Article 3 should not be 
amended because she thinks it is needed 
and would be more cosdy to do at a later 
date. Chairperson McGeough also stated 
that by not adding the HVAC during the 
current building project the district would 
lose the 40% State building aid that is cur- 
rendy available to cover that portion of the 
HVAC cost. Lost aid would amount to 
$160,000. 

Mr. Killen made a Motion to move 
the question. Seconded by Sue McGeough. 
There was a vote taken to amend article 3. 
Amendment failed. 

Superintendent Munsey explained that 
$400,000 would be appropriated, but that 
$400,000 in unanticipated excess revenues 
will be used to offset that appropriation 
creating a zero tax impact. 

Article 3 will appear on ballot as 
written. 

Article 4: Shall the Epping School District 
raise and appropriate as an operating bud- 
get, not including appropriations by special 
warrant articles and other appropriations 
voted separately, the amounts set forth on 
the budget posted with the warrant or as 
amended by vote of the first session, for 
the purposes set forth therein, totaling 
$14,854,624? Should this article be defeat- 
ed the default budget shall be $14,806,286 
which is the same as last year with certain 
adjustments required by previous action of 
the School District or by law; or the gov- 
erning body may hold one special meeting 
in accordance with RSA 40:13, X and XVI, 
to take up the issue of a revised operating 
budget only. 



Recommended by the Epping School Board 
Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee 

Chairperson Kimball made a Motion 
to accept Article 4 as written. Seconded by 
Member LeDuc. 

Member LeDuc spoke on behalf of 
Article 4. See page 5 in School Board 
Handout for details. Mr. LeDuc reported 
that the budget increases are due to health 
insurance and retirement, the new facility, 
special education, and the district in need 
of improvement status. Revenue has also 
been impacted by reductions in state aid 
and Fremont withdrawing more students 
from the high school. 

There was no discussion on Article 4. 
Article 4 will appear on ballot as written. 

Article 5: To transact any other business 
which may legally come before this meet- 
ing. 

Liz Conrad informed the audience 
and the people at home that there will be 
a Speak up Epping event that will be held 
on Saturday, April 14, 2007 starting at 
7 a.m. in the Epping High School Gym- 
nasium. There will be a pancake breakfast, 
babysitting services and a lunch will be pro- 
vided. This event is being held for Epping 
residents to speak up about what they value 
most in Epping and a wish list for Epping's 
future. She encouraged all to save the date 
and make an effort to attend and to help 
guide Epping into the future. 

Chairperson McGeough announced 
that candidate's night will be held on Febru- 
ary 28th in the High School Media Center 
@ 7 p.m. He encouraged everyone to come 
down and ask questions to all candidates. 

Deliberative Session was adjourned at 
8:27 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robin A. O'Day 
School District Clerk 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



SCHOOL WARRANT 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



To the Inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Epping, New Hampshire, 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Epping Elementary School Gymnasium in said 
District on the thirteenth day of March, 2007, at eight o'clock in the forenoon to act upon 
the following subjects: (The polls may not close before seven o'clock in the evening.) 

1. To choose two School Board Members for the ensuing three years. 

2. To choose a School District Treasurer for the remainder of the unexpired 
one year term. 

3. To transact any other business which may legally come before this meeting. 
Given under our hand at said Epping this // day of y^^i<.oaA^j , 2007. 



EPPING SCHOOL BOARD 







A true copy of warrant - attest:: 

EPPING SCHOOL BOARD 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



2007 Sample Ballot 



ABSENTEE 

OFFICIAL BALLOT 

ANNUAL SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTION 

EPPING, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MARCH 13,2007 



SCHOOL DISTRICT CLERK 



INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS 

A. TO VOTE, completely fill in the OVAL to the RIGHT of your choice (s) like this: • 

B. Follow directions as to the number of candidates to be marked for each office. 

C. To vote for a person whose name is not printed on the ballot, write the candidate's name on 
the line provided and completely fill in the OVAL. 



SCHOOL BOARD 
MEMBER 



Vote for not 
more than 2 



SCOTT D. BOOTH 



ERIC CLEMENTS 



SUSAN KIMBALL 



(Write-in) 



(Wnle-in) 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



SCHOOL DISTRICT 
TREASURER 



1 Year 



Vote tor not 
more than 1 



JOSEPH FOLEY 



o 

(Write-inl O 



SCHOOL WARRANTS 



Article 1 . To see if the Epping School District will vote to approve the cost item included in the collective bar- 
gaining agreement reached between the Epping School Board and the Epping Education Association which 
calls tor the following increases in salaries and benefits at the current staffing levels: 



Year 



2007 - 08 



2008 • 09 



2009- 10 



Estimated Increase 



$279,589 



$334,052 



$339,628 



and further to raise and appropriate the sum of $279,589 for the upcoming fiscal year, such sum representing 
the additional costs attributable to the increase in salaries and benefits over those of the appropriation at cur- 
rent staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year. The school board and the budget committee recommend this 
appropriation. 
[Recommended by the Epping School Board; Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee] 



YES O 
NO O 



Article 2. Shall the Epping School District, if article 1 is defeated, authorize the governing body to call one spe- 
cial meeting, at its option, to address article 1 cost items only? 
[Recommended by the Epping School Board] 



YES O 
NO O 



Article 3. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the purpose 
of offsetting additional HVAC costs incurred in the middle school addition project and authorize the use of that 
amount from the June 30 fund balance for this purpose. (This amount is available due to additional interest 
earned on bond proceeds from the middle school addition project transferred to the general fund on or before 
June 30). 
[Recommended by the Epping School Board; Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee] 



YES O 
NO O 



Article 4. Shall the Epping School District raise and appropriate as an operating budget, not including appro- 
priations by special warrant articles and other appropriations voted separately, the amounts set forth on the 
budget posted with the warrant or as amended by vote of the first session, for the purposes set forth therein, 
totaling $14,854,624? Should this article be defeated the default budget shall be $14,806,286 which is the 
same as last year with certain adjustments required by previous action of the School District or by law; or the 
governing body may hold one special meeting in accordance with RSA 40:13, X and XVI, to take up the issue 
of a revised operating budget only. 
[Recommended by the Epping School Board; Recommended by the Epping Budget Committee] 



YES O 

NO O 



Epping School District 2006 Annual Report 



Auditor's Report 




Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 
193 North Main Street ■ Con cord ■ New Hampshire ■ 03301-5063 ■ 603-225-6996 ■ FAX-224-1380 

INDEPENDENT A UDITOR 'S REPORT 

To the Members of the School Board 
Epping School District 
Epping, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities, each major fund and the aggregate 
remaining fund information of the Epping School District as of and for the year ended June 30, 2006, which collectively 
comprise the School District's basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are die 
responsibility of the School District's management Our responsibility is to express opinions on the financial statements based 
on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the 
standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the 
United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the 
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the 
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and 
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that 
our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinions 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position 
of the governmental activities, each major fund and the aggregate remaining fund information of the Epping School District as of 
June 30, 2006, and the respective changes in financial position thereof for the year then ended in conformity with accounting 
principles generally accepted in the United States of America. 

In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued a report dated October 20, 2006 on our consideration of 
the School District's internal control over financial reporting and our tests of compliance with certain provisions of laws, 
regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing 
of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the 
internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance 
with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in assessing the results of our audit. 

The management's discussion and analysis and budgetary comparison information are not a required part of the basic financial 
statements, but are supplementary information required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of 
America We have applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally of inquiries of management regarding the 
methods of measurement and presentation of the required supplementary information. However, we did not audit the 
information and express no opinion on it. 

Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that collectively comprise the Epping 
School District's basic financial statements. The combining and individual fund schedules are presented for the purposes of 
additional analysis and are not a required part of the basic financial statements. The accompanying schedule of expenditures of 
federal awards is presented for purposes of additional analysis as required by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget 
Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations, and is also not a required part of the basic 
financial statements of the Epping School District. The combining and individual fund schedules and the schedule of 
expenditures of federal awards have been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial 
statements and, in our opinion, are fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a 
whole. 






yyuArttftf. aap? y £/% 



October 20, 2006 PLODZIK & SANDERSON 

Professional Association 



2006 Annual Report 



Epping School District 



EXHIBIT C-l 

EPPING SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Balance Sheet 

Governmental Funds 

June 30, 2006 













School 





















Construction 




Other 




Total 








Food 




and 


Governmental 


Governmental 






General 


Service 


Grants 


Renovations 




Funds 




Funds 


ASSETS 




















Cash and cash equivalents 


$ 


387,780 


S 76,974 


$ 


$ 4,011,146 


5 


12,775 


S 


4,488,675 


Investments 










7,000,000 








7,000,000 


Receivables: 




















Interest 










217,541 








217,541 


Intergovernmental 




8,276 


24,218 


78,679 


- 




- 




111,173 


Interfund receivable 




168,423 


- 


- 


9,343 




- 




177,766 


Prepaid items 


S 


109,450 

673,929 


- 


- 


- 




- 


S 


109,450 


Total assets 


$ 101,192 


S 78,679 


S 1 1,238,030 


$ 


12,775 


12,104,605 



LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 

Liabilities: 
Accounts payable 
Accrued salaries and benefits 
Contracts payable 
Intergovernmental payable 
Interfund payable 
Total liabilities 

Fund balances: 
Reserved for encumbrances 
Reserved for special purposes 
Unreserved, undesignated, reported in: 
General fund 
Capital projects funds 
Special revenue funds 
Total fund balances 
Total liabilities and fund balances 



S 290,965 



,400 



292,365 



10,588 
9,343 


98,125 
98,125 

3,067 
3,067 


4,011 

4,378 
68,890 
78,679 


231,609 

1,408 
233,017 

9,785,894 
1,219,119 


- 


14,599 

231,609 

4,378 

177,766 


310,896 


- 


720,717 


157,060 
205,973 


467,500 
(454,725) 


9,942,954 
1,686,619 

205,973 
(454,725) 
3,067 


363,033 


- 


11,005,013 
5 11,238.030 


12,775 
$ 12,775 


11,383,888 


S 673,929 


S 101,192 


$ 78,679 : 


$ 12,104,605 



Epping School District 



2006 Annual Report 



EXHIBIT C-3 

EPPING SCHOOL. DISTRICT 

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances 

Governmental Funds 

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2006 











School 














Construction 


Other 


Total 






Food 




and 


Governmental 


Governmental 




General 


Service 


Grants 


Renovations 


Funds 


Funds 


Revenues: 














School district assessment 


S 6,696,439 


$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 6,696,439 


Other local 


1,288,727 


217,593 


- 


403,460 


18,463 


1,928,243 


State 


4,550,462 


4,358 


9,000 


- 


- 


4,563,820 


Federal 

Total revenues 

Expenditures: 


25,860 
12,561.488 


144,117 


399,018 




4,799 


573,794 




40B.U18 


4UJ.46U 


23,262 


13,762,296 


Current: 














Instruction 


7,475,667 


- 


408,018 


- 


- 


7.883.685 


Support services: 














Student 


829,196 


- 


- 


- 


- 


829,196 


Instructional staff 


587,041 


- 


- 


- 


- 


587.041 


General administration 


79,377 


- 


- 


- 


- 


79,377 


Executive administration 


447,491 


- 


- 


- 


- 


447,491 


School administration 


756,033 


- 


- 


- 


- 


756,033 


Operation and maintenance of plant 


870,253 


- 


- 


- 


- 


870,253 


Student transportation 


386,805 


- 


- 


- 


- 


386,805 


Other 


464,609 


- 


- 


- 


- 


464,609 


Non-instructional services 


- 


389,041 


- 


- 




389,041 


Debt service: 














Principal 


76,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


76,000 


Interest 


330,648 


- 


- 


- 


- 


330,648 


Facilities acquisition and construction 


237,283 
12,540,403 


- 


- 


1,743,447 


69,483 


2,050,213 


Total expenditures 


389,041 


408,018 


1,743,447 


69,483 


15,150,392 


Excess (deficiency) of revenues 








over (under) expenditures 


21.085 


(22,973) 


- 


(1.339,987) 


(46,221) 


(1.388.096) 


Other financing sources (uses): 










Transfers in 


155,000 


25,000 


- 


- 


- 


180,000 


Transfers out 


(25,000) 


- 


- 


(155,000) 


- 


(180,000) 


Bonds issued 


- 


- 


- 


12.072,350 


- 


12,072,350 


Premium on bonds issued 


- 


- 


- 


427,650 
12,345,000 

11,005,013 


- 


427,650 


Total other financing sources and uses 


130,000 
151,085 


25,000 
2,027 


- 


- 


12,500,000 


Net change in fund balances 




(46,221) 


11,111,904 


Fund balances, beginning 


211,948 
$ 363,033 


1,040 


- 


- 


58,996 
$ 12,775 


271,984 


Fund balances, ending 


S 3,067 


$ 


% 11,005,013 


SI 1,383.888 



2006 Annual Report Epping School District 



EPPING SCHOOL DISTRICT 

DETAILED EXPENDITURE & REVENUE DATA FOR SPECIAL 
EDUCATION (HANDICAPPED / DISABLED ONLY) (ALL FUNDS) 

REQUIRED PER RSA 32 : 1 1 -a 

EXPENDITURE 

Instruction 

Related Services 

Administration 

Legal 

Transportation 

TOTAL 

REVENUE 

Tuition (Local) 

Adequate Education (State) 

Catastrophic Aid (State) 

Medicaid (Federal) 

Disability Programs (Federal) 

TOTAL 

EXPENDITURE 
MINUS REVENUE 

* Decrease due to Fremont students transitioning to Sanborn. 

* * There is no special education allocation in the formula for state adequate education in 2004-2005. 

DETAILED EXPENDITURE & REVENUE DATA FOR SPECIAL 
EDUCATION (CULTURALLY DEPRIVED, BILINGUAL, AND 
GIFTED & TALENTED) ( ALL FUNDS) 



2004-2005 


2005-2006 


$2,031,149 


$2,369,813 


$440,047 


$646,712 


$114,791 


$185,782 


$1,079 


$4,888 


$145,680 


$131,577 


$2,732,745 


$3,338,772 


2004-2005 


2005-2006 


$103,318 


$86,243 * 


$0 


$1,360,393 ** 


$108,446 


$74,566 


$26,251 


$25,860 


$211,658 


$222,039 


$449,672 


$1,769,101 


2004-2005 


2005-2006 


$2,283,073 


$1,569,671 



BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


2004-2005 


2005-2006 




Expenditure 


$ 17,025 


$ 


29,116 


Revenue 










Espenditure minus Revenue 


$ 17,025 


$ 


29,116 



No expense / revenue reported for culturally deprived or gifted/talented. 



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